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Greece

Νaxos Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

The largest Cycladic Island, Naxos is known in Greek mythology as the place where ungracious Theseus abandoned Ariadne after she helped him escape from the Minoan Labyrinth. However, her story had a happy ending, as she came across Dionysos, the Greek God of Wine, who fell for her and took her to Mount Olymbus, where she became immortal.

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

More hilly and more fertile than the rest of the Cyclades, Naxos combines sandy beaches with mountainous traditional villages. More laid back than nearby Paros, it mostly draws families and well-placed crowds. Nightlife is not as feverish as in Paros, Ios and Myconos, but you still have a variety of options to enjoy yourself at night. Naxian wine is considered one of the best varieties in Greece.

Getting around

As in most Cycladic Islands, a number of buses connect Hora (the main parish) with other villages around the island. Depending to your destination, bus routes range from frequent to rare.

Since distances in Naxos are longer than in other islands, renting a car or scooter is advised. Car rentals are plenty on the island. Always remember to keep an eye for careless or drunk drivers.

Things to see and do in Naxos

Once you have enjoyed the sun and the sea, it is time to start exploring the hidden treasures of this island. Although Zeus was supposed to have been born on the island of Crete, Naxos is considered to be the place where he grew up, according to Greek mythology. Therefore, the island’s highest mountain was named after him. At the foot of Zeus Mountain, one will find Zeus Cave, a large natural cavern with fascinating clusters of stalactites and stalagmites.

Walk from Hora to Palatia Islet, which is today linked with the main island, to visit the ancient Temple of Apollo. Little of the temple is still standing, including a large marble gate known as Portara. Join the locals and tourists who flock to the site to watch the sunset.

A day trip to Apollonas Village, on the north coast, is a must for archaeology enthusiasts. In a marble pit near the village, you will come across a 10-meter long Kouros (male statue), which dates back to the 6th century BC and is estimated to represent the god Dionysos.

The Archaeologial Museum at Hora features a wide collection of figurines from early Cycladic, Hellenistic and Roman eras, along with other artefacts discovered on the island. The museum is housed in a former college, where the famous Greek novelist Nikos Kazantzakis studied for a brief period.

Bazeos Castle, near the village of Sangri, is a beautifully restored 17th-century monastery, which today serves as the island’s cultural center. Naxos Festival takes place in the castle during July and August, hosting art exhibitions, concerts and other cultural events.

The village of Halki is maybe the most picturesque parish on the island. Surrounded by olive groves, it features scenic alleys, restored old villas and Byzantine churches. Try the locally made pastries and traditional citron liqueur. Vallindras Distillery, at Halki’s main square, offers free tours, where visitors can watch the process of the liqueur production and taste some of the distillery’s finest aperitifs. Two kilometres out of the village stands Panagia Drosiani, a Byzantine church which boasts impressive frescos from the 7th century.

Apiranthos is an excellent mountainous village, with no less than three local museums. Walk down the village’s main street, where the Archaeology Museum, Geology Museum and Museum of Natural History are located. Apart from the museums, feel free to stroll among picturesque backstreets, old stone houses and charming backyards; wave to the friendly locals, who always welcome visitors with a warm smile.

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Reporting mainly on the Asia Pacific region and the global Coronavirus crises in countries such as Thailand, Germany & Switzerland. Born near Cologne and a longterm resident of Bangkok, Udon Thani, Sakon Nakhon and Phuket. A great fan of Bali, Rhodes & Corfu. Love to follow the English Premier League , the German Bundesliga and the Spanish La Liga.

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Greece

Corfu Coronavirus Cases – Corfu Covid-19 Cases Update

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Set in Adriatic Sea, Corfu, or Kerkira as the Greeks call it, was picked by Homer to be Odysseus’s semi-final stop, before he managed to reach home after 20 years of wandering. Part of the Byzantine Empire, it later thrived under the rule of Venetians and French, while the rest of Greece was under Ottoman occupation. During that time Corfu became an important artistic and educational hub, inheriting numerous architectural gems, which still stand on the islands streets and squares.

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

Browse down for full details of the current Coronavirus situation in Greece

Blessed with green hills and white-sand beaches, Corfu features a picturesque historic center and enchanted medieval fortresses. If you find yourself on the island during orthodox Easter, stroll around its kadounia (narrow streets) on Holy Saturday midnight; due to an old custom, Corfiots throw clay pitchers off their balconies, along with chocolate for visitors and children.

Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα, Kerkyra) is the northernmost of the Ionian Islands in Greece. Located off of the far northwest coast of the country, Corfu lies in the Adriatic sea, east of Italy and southwest of Albania. Historically Corfu has been controlled by many foreign powers, notably the Venetians, and British.

Regions

Corfu is 62 km long and at its widest point, nearly 30 km wide. The island is formed by two mountain ranges. The northern runs from the west to east and consists of limestones, reached in the Mount Pantokrator (914 meters) the maximum height of the island, while the southern mountain range is less high and streches from north to south. The North of the island is wider and more mountainous. The coastal areas are well developed with good pebbly beaches. However, the northeast coast has always remained a favorite, aka Kensington on sea. It is also where the island’s oldest village ‘Old Perithia’ is located just beneath Mt. Pantokrator, a Heritage Protected Site in a designated Area of Natural Beauty. The South of the island is less wide (only a few miles across from west to east) and tends to have sandier beaches.

Towns and villages

Image of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideTowns

  • Corfu Town – known in modern Greek as Kerkira or Kerkyra, is the largest and most important town on the island. This is where the airport is located and where most cruise ships and long distance ferries dock. It is a small, pleasant city catering well to tourists. Its old town is listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Villages

  • Arillas – A beach resort that still feels like a village. Arillas has a long and wide sandy beach at the northwest corner of Corfu. Beautiful nature, clear waters and a beach offering much privacy. Many naturists have been coming to Arillas for decades because of this, so if you wander off to the left or right side of the beach, be prepared to encounter naked people! Arillas is also developing fast as one of the biggest spiritual spots of the world. There are three spiritual centers offering different courses on meditation, chanting, dancing, creative arts and also many people practicing all kinds of massage. Ideal to relax body, mind and spirit. The village is also famous for its festivals. The first is held on Ascension day (40 days after Easter, 13 June for 2020), another is held in the first weekend of August and the Wine festival is held on the first weekend of September. Many hundreds of people come to Arillas from all Northern Corfu to enjoy traditional dancing, great souvlakia, local wine, and the famous, fresh Corfu Beer which is produced in the village.
  • Benitses  – a very old, traditional fishing village. Benitses lies 12 km south of Corfu Town, and leads to the emerald valley. The water of the springs which flow from the mountains of Aghii Deka and Stavros, join together in two small rivers, giving the area the name Pinisse (derived from the ancient Greek word ‘Pinio’) = Pinitse = Benitses. The mild climate and the natural beauty of Benitses village has attracted a lot of tourists from the beginning of the century. It is only during the last 30 years that tourism has replaced all other sources of income and now is the sole occupation of the inhabitants during the summer season. The coastal road of Benitses is full of hotels, restaurants, cafes and other shops that offering everything the most demanding visitor can ask. Benitses is surrounded by the mountains in one side and the aquamarine waters of the Ionian Sea in the other, this unique combination of nature with the hospitality of the residents, which are very familiar with different cultures, are what make visitors to love the place. 3km to the north there is the famous Achilleion palace.
  • Kalami  – the village is where the British novelist Lawrence Durrell and his wife Nancy Isobel Myers chose to live from 1935 until the Greek surrender in April 1941
  • Kassiopi  – One of the more relaxed and atmospheric resorts with a pretty bay and beach that is mostly stony. The waters are crystal clear and calm. Somewhat spoilt by the prevalence of tacky tourist bars and cafes catering to the many English tourists that crowd the town.
  • Kavos – a seaside village on the island of Corfu in Greece, in the municipal district and the municipality of Lefkimmi. It is now a lively resort heavily devoted to tourism, and popular with young holidaymakers from Britain and Northern Europe.
  • Kynopiastes  – a traditional village of the Messi Region of Corfu and only 10 km away from Corfu town and airport, which is a must visit. Old mansions of the 17th to 19th centuries, a marble church, a 17th-century monastery and a museum (and the only one on the island) devoted to the olive tree with one of the world famous restaurants on the island tavern «Trypas», which has hosted Kings ike the Kings of Greece and England, Presidents of Countries like Konstantinos Karamanlis (Greece) and François Mitterrand (France), stars of the European and American cinema and music, like Jane Fonda, and Anthony Quinn. The narrow tiled paths invite you to walk on them, looking at the small squares and at the houses which preserve the traditional colors. The main church is devoted to the Virgin Mary and it is in the central square. It is a traditional church with unique architecture and an impressive marble entrance. Inside, there are frescoes of the 18th century Ionian School of Painting. At the edge of the village there is the monastery of Agia Paraskevi, built in the 17th century.
  • Lakones – a typical Corfiot village on the slope of a green hill. You should go for a walk to Bella Vista to admire the view over the bay of Paleokastritsa and relax in one of the picturesque coffee shops. If you like trekking there is a path leading down to Paleokastritsa. The surnames of the inhabitants of the region refer to the soldiers who supported Angelokastro in the late Byzantine period, as well as to refugees from Mani. Among the houses of the 18th and 19th centuries you will find churches and traditional coffee shops. At the central church you will see donations of the first emigrants to America of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Lefkimmi –  a village with a wide long sandy beach that is quiet due to being in the less busy South. There’s a practical taverna with a children’s playground. The waters are extremely calm and very shallow, even out for quite some distance.
  • Nymphes – a big village with a lot of water, green and legends built on a height of 200 meters. According to a legend, in old times, the Nymphs used to bathe in the village’s waterfalls. A walk to the wells and the waterfalls is enough to make you understand why this legend exists. It is almost certain that you will come across a nymph, too and if you are lucky, you will see her bathe in the water especially in spring. After your walk to the myths, it is a good idea to visit the premises of the Agriculture Co-operative which elaborates kum-kuat and produces liquor and sweets. You will be offered some for free and you will have the chance to try the different liquor qualities (and of course, buy some, if you like). Just outside the village, you can visit Askitario, a small but historic monastery. According to tradition, here lived in the 5th century the monk Artemios Paissios from Epirus, who is said to have worked many wonders.
  • Old Perithia – This is the last remaining Heritage Protected Village on the island. Located in the north east, just below Mt. Pantokrator, the village nestles in a Designated Area of Natural Beauty and records date back to c. 1350. The village is made up of 130 houses and surrounded by 8 churches, it has 4 tavernas and 1 boutique bed & breakfast making ot one of the most unique and unspoiled places to stay and a regular feature of the Durrell Week that takes place around May each year as it’s perfect for walkers and those interested in flora, fauna, insects and wildlife. A hideaway from Pirate attacks, the village has views to, but cannot be seen, from the sea, eventually tourism in the late 1960s and 1970s drove villagers towards the coast but it always remained inhabited. Today, locals and visitors alike travel to the village to see the ruins and restorations – the food is ‘mountain prices’ and often locally sourced. Such is the popularity of the village that Corfiots visit at weekends throughout the winter, to sit around the fires and enjoy the authentic Corfiot dishes. Some of the best beaches on the island are 20 minutes (8 km) drive away so you can enjoy slip away during the day and return to the peace and quiet of ‘your own village’ as the sun sets over the mountain tops.
  • Roda – a village resort on Corfu’s northern coast. Traditionally a fishing village, the area has retained its character while developing in to a popular destination for holidays. Unique in the sense that the old village still exists at the heart of the resort, locals mix with the different nationalities who visit time and time again. Roda is a contained resort, without the typical sprawl. There is plenty of accommodation, bars, restaurants which offer a wide range of menus, typical Greek and Corfiot dishes, Italian, Chinese and others. Roda is a relaxed resort but has a great nightlife, with nice bands, singers and comedy shows as well as the ever popular kareoke. If you want a laid back holiday, then Roda is the place, with quiet corners and a beautiful sandy beach, Roda offers something for everyone.

Understand

The satisfactory infrastructure and the multiple possibilities for various activities are conducive for group holidays on Corfu and the nearby islands. Motivation trips, congress tourism, school trips, Ferrari or antique cars clubs and Harley Davidson groups meet here every year.

Corfu’s nature, sea and history are draws for the visitor. In a place with a tradition in tourism of at least 130 years, with Greek education and the influence of “nobility” from England, France and Venice, in a place which is used to welcoming the international jet-set for several decades now, the possibilities for sports and amusement are certainly impressive.

That said, this also means that Corfu is not the place to go if you look for an authentic Greek experience. Because of the massive influence of tourism, there is nothing of Greece left here. Even the smallest beaches are spoilt by huge resorts, overpriced “traditional tavernas” that serve burgers and English breakfast, have dessert on the menu, and have touts to try to pull you in. Only a few mountain villages are left where you can hide away from tourists and be mainly amongst the Greeks.

Corfu can be a good destination for family holidays. Corfu may not have a Disneyland, children’s museums, zoos or other things closely connected with children, but the whole island is welcoming and safe for children. In Corfu there are no tropical diseases and very little danger from criminality, violence, dangerous seas, etc. Children play safely in the streets, in the parks, at the playgrounds and on the beach.

Climate

The climate of the archipelago of Corfu is warm Mediterranean. The summer here is warm and relatively dry with a blue sky, often cooled by seasonal breezes, offering the ideal conditions for surfing, while rarely is it interrupted by rains. The mountainous areas are cooler. The winter here is mild. Rainfall occurs mainly from November till March. On average, there are 3000 hours of sun per year with an average daily sunshine duration of 8.5 hours.

Hours of sunshine
Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct
Corfu 7 10 12 12 11 9 6

Spring here is impressive and offers visitors the privilege to enjoy the wealth of vegetation and colors, combined with high-taste tourism.

Easter celebration here becomes the experience of a lifetime.

Summer is the most popular season for Corfu, with beautiful beaches and crystal water for unconcerned hours on the beach.

Autumn is the season of vintage, the period during which the whole island smells of grapes; it may be the best time to get to know the routine of the island.

Christmas and New Year’s Day in Corfu is music, hymns, carols, in a quiet, decorated place with a mild climate and a noble finesse.

Get in

By plane

Corfu International Airport is served by several airlines.

By boat

Direct ferry links exist to/ from Venice, Ancona, Bari and Brindisi in Italy, Himara and Sarandë in Albania and Igoumenitsa and Patra on the mainland (Greece). As of March 2008, a bunk in a four-person cabin from Venice to Corfu was €107.

From/to Sarandë in Albania, a one-way ticket costs €19 in the off-season, and €24 mid-June to mid-Sept.

By road transport

  • By the buses of Corfu KTEL (or Green buses), which connect Corfu on a daily basis to Athens, Patra, Thessaloniki and other places in Greece.

In your own yacht

If you come in your own yacht the Marina, Gouvia offers you a comfortable stay, very close to Corfu town, while in the town you can moor off at the NAOK harbour, as well as at the Old Port.

You can also moor off at Benitses Marina, which is situated not far from Corfu town.

Get around

By bus

There are two types of bus in Corfu – Blue buses serve Corfu town and the environs, Green buses serve the rest of the island.

The Blue bus terminal in Corfu Town is in San Rocco Square. The bus information kiosk displays timetables and provides maps showing exactly where the buses terminate (some terminate a few blocks south of the square). Bus stops have electronic displays, and self-service ticket machines. Tickets are single-journey only and must be validated on the bus. They can be bought from the machines, or from the driver (for €0.50 more).

Useful lines include the number 7 which goes to and from Dasia every 20 minutes (30 minutes on Sundays), the 10 which goes to and from Achilion every two hours, the 6 to and from Benitses (not quite hourly) and the 11 to and from Pelekas every 2–3 hours.

The airport bus is No 19 – check the timetable as frequency varies during the day with some big gaps. It is only a ten-minute ride, and costs €1.10. Number 6 Benitses bus also goes past the end of the airport access road from where it is a 500m walk to the terminal.

More information about the timetables and routes of Blue buses can be obtained through their website,which is available in multiple languages.

The Green Bus Station is near the New Port, from where buses depart for all villages of Corfu Island. Regular departures to Paleokastritsa, Sidari, Kavos, Roda, Acharavi, Kassiopi.

By taxi

There are plently of taxi lines in Corfu Town.

  • between the Spaniada and the cricket ground.
  • at the heart of the shopping center of the town in Methodiou street
  • at the Old Port
  • at the New Port
  • many others in Gouvia, Dassia, Benitses, Ipsos, the Airport etc.

And there is the radio taxi which can be reached by phone at +30 26610 33811

By car

You can hire a car at the airport or through one of many local companies. In general, it is cheaper to pre-book a hire car via the Internet before arriving. Many of the roads are very narrow so it can be better to choose a small car. While there is a good road running North-South along the East coast from Sidari to Lefkimmi and from Corfu town across the island to Paleokastritsa, many roads have poor surfacing. Often the insurance provided for hire cars does not cover damage to the underside of the car so watch out for large holes in the road. Hire car companies often provide a free map but you may find it worth buying one in advance as the maps are not especially good, especially for the North-West interior.

By boat

A great way to explore the island and access beaches that can’t be easily accessed otherwise is to rent a boat. Most towns have at least one boat rental company and boats up to 30HP do not require a licence to hire.

Travel by bicycle in Corfu

In the city traffic is pretty wild and noisy.

An automatic bike sharing scheme, called EasyBike Brainbox was available to rent bicycles. As of April 2014 the system looked pretty dysfunctional.

By quad bike

There is nothing better than renting a quad bike and driving round the villages, it’s a lot of fun and a lot quicker than walking!

See

Old Corfu town, a world heritage site

Beaches

There is a good variety of beaches on Corfu. On the West side of the island, the beaches are sandier while the East tends to have calmer waters. The north-east coast is also home to most of Corfu’s upmarket holiday villas. Nudist beaches   are also there in quite a number.

  • SidariA fair sized resort dominated by British tourists. At one end of the beach is the “Canal de l’Amour”: sand stone cliffs with narrow inlets, a natural archway and small paths to explore.
  • Dasia and IpsosA narrow stony beach with relatively calm waters. The resort runs along the road so there’s a good variety of shops and tavernas.
  • GlifadaA long wide sandy beach with fairly rough waters.
  • Pelekas beachAlso a nice sandy beach.
  • San Stefanos beachA long beautiful beach on the north west of the island, very good for sunbathing as there is loads of sunbeds.
  • Barbati beachCrystal clear!
  • Chalikounas beachA very long, virgin stretch of land, caught between Chalikiopoulos’ Lake and the Adriatic sea. The natural landscape here is unique, it is a great place to get away from the world and just enjoy both sea and sun.
  • Issos beachNext to Chalikounas, again on the southwest of Corfu, this beach has a desert motive, because of the high sand hills right next to the seashore. Bring your bike and enjoy the terrain, or just enjoy the panoramic view from high above.
  • Prasoudi beachHigh cliffs hang over your head, clean waters and a mix of sand and pebbles. A remote beach that will not leave you unsatisfied.
  • Mesongi beach.

What to do in Corfu

  • AqualandAgios Ioannis.  10:00am-6:00pmIt’s quite a small water park with only a few main “rides”. It is best to travel to and from the park under your own steam as a whole day there with an organised trip might be too long.
  • Walk the Corfu TrailCorfu is an ideal location for a keen walker. The North is fairly rugged with Mt. Pantokrator, the highest mountain, and beneath it Corfu’s oldest village, Ano (Upper)Perithia. At the other extreme is Korission Lake in the South; an inland lake, separated by a thin sand bar from the sea. The Corfu Trail is a 222 km long distance footpath covering the full length of the islands. The route is well signed and a book accompanies the trail, there is also an introduction, history and walking guide for Old Perithia, Corfu’s oldest village which you pass through on the Corfu Trail.
  • MeditationThere are several meditation centres on Corfu, and many people practicing massage and giving all kinds of sessions, from deep tissue massage to craniosacral and psychic massage.
  • MassageThere are many people practicing massage and giving all types of sessions, from deep tissue massage, relaxation, Reiki therapy. One center is Arillas in the north west of the island but there are also places in and close to Corfu town offering courses and sessions as well as mobile massage therapists  who come to your villa, apartment or even boat/yacht.
  • YachtingThere is a lot of yachting going on in Corfu and the Ionian, it’s an ideal spot due to calm weather conditions, Magic Islands, and fun people. Corfu and Ionian in general is an ideal place for sailing and yachting with steady fair winds all summer long. Motoryacht Pyewacket is the newest addition in Gouvia Marina, its a 20m motor charter yacht made by sunseeker with two professional UK/Dutch Crew members on there third season in the Ionian. Another operator is the Discovery Yachting offering yachts for sailing in the Ionian.

Eat

Eat at Agni Bay either in the evenings or during the day, arrive on foot or by boat, there are 3 places to eat on the beach all excellent, some of the best food ever. Water Taxis run some evenings from some of the surrounding villages. Very Romantic, but prices are high here. A very special place to be. As featured in Gerald Durrells ‘ My Family and Other Animals’

  • Klimataria or Grapevinebenitses (opposite blue bus stop in benitses).  7PM-11PMIf you aren’t a seafood fan then this restaurant might not appeal to you as there are limited alternatives, although there is a good selection for vegetarians. Its a family run business and the setting, a very old building, must be the most photographed building in Benitses. Eat early to get a table as the locals rarely eat before 22.00. 10-40€.pp.
  • To FagopotionAgios StefanosWorth visiting but praise in the Guardian newspaper on 13 09 08 (ostentatiously displayed at the entrance )may have gone to chef Christos Vlachos’ head. Don’t let him bully you. Some of the cooking is good, some is ordinary, and some has the feel of leftovers from the night before.

Shopping in Corfu

As elsewhere in Greece, olive wood, ceramic and leather goods are common. In addition to many tourist shops in places such as Corfu town, you will find small shops along some of the more major roads, often combined with the factory / workshop. In some remoter areas, you may find locals selling locally produced wine, honey and olive oil from small street-side stalls.

Drink

Gingerbeer. Corfu was a British protectorate and gingerbeer is one of the British style drinks that the locals adopted with enthusiasm. The Greek version is simply excellent. Ask for it at Liston or better restaurants and coffee houses. Locally it is called “Tsitsibeera”

Corfu Beer . In Arillas, in the north of Corfu there is the Corfu Microbrewery. They produce four different kinds of beer, all of them unpasteurised (so they have to be drunk within a couple of months of their production) and all of them delicious! They are so good that they were selected by J.D. Wetherspoon to produce Koroibos Beer, exclusively for the London Olympics. You can visit the brewery and have a taste of their beers. Better give them a call in advance at +30 26630 52072

Where to stay in Corfu

Corfu has countless options for accommodation – from 5 star hotels in Corfu town to spare rooms you will only find by asking around as well as many private villa and vacation rentals that are typically booked in advance or online. With so many people staying in Croatia and other hot spots, accommodation in Corfu is plentiful, but note that most of the accommodation is in the coastal areas – budget hotels are not so easy to find in Corfu Town.

Northern Corfu

  • Belmare Corfu hotel (Corfu luxury hotel) (Kassiopi village). A friendly family run hotel close to Avlaki beach of Corfu island.
  • Zambeta Apartments (Zambeta Apartments Arillas), Arillas, Corfu 49081 (Located in Arillas, 300 meters from the beach) ,   Zambeta Apartments is a small, family-run pension in Arillas. 300 meters from the beach, near the center of Arillas but still quiet, with a beautiful garden. Clean, light and spacious apartments for couples or singles. Two meditation centres within 1 km, a third one at 3 km. from 30 euros.
  • Hotel Corfu SecretAgios Markos ,  fax+30 2661097931 Check-in: 12:00, check-out: 12:00Lowest price: 45€.

Southern Corfu

  • Corfu Santa Barbara (Corfu Santa Barbara), Perivoli (South Corfu) ,  fax+30 26620 24941 .
  • Palms and Spas, Corfu Boutique ApartmentsMessonghi Beach (18km from Corfu Town).  Check-in: 14:00, check-out: 11:00Elegant apartments within olive groves and palm trees, overlooking the Ionian Sea. The accommodation has Suite rooms (with private outdoors jacuzzi/hot-tub, living-room) and smaller quaint Studios; all have sea views and Messonghi beach is just 100 meters/5 mins away. Free Wi-Fi in the rooms and parking on site. from 39 €/night.
  • River Studios & ApartmentsMessongi (Bus servise or taxi) ,   River studios & Apartments for two persons, or group of friends. Rooms equipped with TV, air conditioning, kitchenette, fridge, bathroom. Swimming pool for guests available. 40€.
  • Corfu Villa LefkiChalikouna beachNewly built villa on a unique virgin beach, next to St. Matthew village in the southwest of the island
  • Family StudiosMarathias BeachBudget studios and apartments which was recently renovated, it is run by very friendly family and staff, situated right on the sea front of Marathias beach.
  • Govino Bay HotelGouvia 491 00 ,   In front of Gouvia Bay. Most of the resort is covered by green gardens, olive and palm trees. The complex is build amphitheatrically, with buildings of four to five apartments each one, all scattered around.
  • Hermes Apartments DassiaDassia, Corfu (Opposite the Chandris Hotel).
  • Kaiser Bridge HotelBenitses ,  fax+30 26610 72098Check-in: 14:00, check-out: 12:00Hotel Kaiser Bridge is situated right on the beach, 9 km (6 mi) to the south of Corfu Town, between Perama and the picturesque fishing village of Benitses. Just 10 m from the beach, the hotel has breathtaking views of the shorelines of mainland Greece, Pontikonissi and of course of the famous Kaiser’s Bridge, once used by Queen Sissi to access Achillion Palace, which is situated just 1.5 km (0.9 mi) above the hotel in the village of Gastouri. Jorgos and the rest of the family where great hosts. Lowest price: 18€ depending on the season.
  • Lena Mare Hotel ApartmentsAcharavi ,  fax+30 26630 63717 Check-in: 12:00, check-out: 12:00Lowest price: 40€.
  • Marlina Corfu VillasKommenoat Kommeno bay, 8 kilometers from the airport.
  • Pantokrator Hotel (Northeast of Corfu town, next to Barbati). Panoramic views over the southern part of the island.
  • Saint Nicholas HotelGouvia, Corfu.  Check-in: 14:00, check-out: 12:00.
  • The Pink PalaceAgios Gordios Beach ,   Check-in: 24 hours, check-out: 9AMA backpacker spot, the hostel offers free transportation from the ferry by their pink bus, and new arrivals are given a shot of pink liquor. Activities offered at the Pink Palace include a Kayak and ATV rental, as well as a number of guided activities such as other island excursions. Most other activities on offer (of which there are plenty) revolve around drinking – the booze cruise for example (jump off the big rock naked and get free beer) and the hostel’s own club – packed out during the summer months. Breakfast and dinner are included in the price of the room. Dorms from €18; single rooms from €30/45 low/high season.
  • Sunrock (on the West Coast, down the cliff from Pelekas). Sunrock is a low-key, relaxed place, just up from Pelekas beach. Many people find themselves here in order to escape from the incessant partying down the coast, yet Sunrock has a bar and is often full of young people with a less commercially oriented party in mind. A shuttle is normally offered to carry passengers from the port, and during warmer months daily scooter rentals are available.
  • The Merchant’s House Boutique Bed & Breakfast (The Merchant’s House), Old Perithia (Located in Corfu’s oldest village in the north-east of the island).  Check-in: 14.30, check-out: 11.00There are just six suites in beautifully restored houses dating back to 1828, providing a unique accommodation in a Heritage Protected Site (dating back to the 14th century) and area of natural beauty beneath Mount Pantokrator (the island’s tallest mountain). from 135.
  • Castelli CottageAcharavi, Fourni ,   Castelli cottage is a traditional 150-year-old stone house, that was restored and renovated. The guesthouse is located in a green natural environment among old olive trees and cypresses, with a spectacular view to the northern coast of the island and to the off-coast island of Othonoi.

Go next

Corfu makes a good start for a tour of the Ionian Islands. It’s also a good jumping-off place to get to Italy or Albania.

Day trips to Paxi are widely available.

Day trips to Sarandë in Albania are also very popular. This is usually combined with an excursion to the UNESCO World Heritage site of Sarandë which is to be highly recommended! A tour of the Albanian Riviera is a must!

Around Corfu

At the outskirts of Corfu Town, lays Mon Repos, a large estate which is one of the island’s most popular attractions. Built in 1831 to be Frederick Adam’s summer residence, it hosted a series of royals, including Austria’s well-known Princess Sissy. Featuring a fusion of colonial and neo-classical architecture, it is also known as Achilleion Place, due to two huge statutes of Achilles, set in its splendid gardens.

Old Perithia is the island’s oldest village, featuring some of the finest samples of Corfu’s Venetian architecture. An old pirate hideout, today it is a Heritage Protected Site. For more excellent examples of local architecture, pay a visit to the village of Kynopiastes, where you can admire 17th-century villas and walk down scenic colourful alleys.

Natural beauty meets ancient mythology at Nymphes Village. Surrounded by lush greenery and charming waterfalls, the village is supposed to occupy the area where Nymphs bathed themselves in ancient times. Nymphes also houses an excellent agriculture co-operative, where visitors can taste and bye traditional kumquat liqueur and sweets.

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Timeline of Covid-19 Infections in Greece

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Greece

Rhodes Coronavirus Cases Covid-19 Cases Reported

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Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος, Ródos) is one of the largest and most fertile of the Greek Islands, and is one of the most visited because of its combination of beaches, archaeological sites, and extensive medieval town.

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

The climate is particularly good, with the weather typically sunny and mild. The island is usually counted as one of the Dodecanese, but due to its importance for travelers is considered separately here.

The rock-rose is so prolific here that it has been named the ‘Island of Roses,’ though modern scholars doubt the ancient theory that the island’s name comes from the Greek word for rose. While the northern coast is renowned for its lively tourist resorts the south offers tranquil beaches and a slower, more simple pace of life.

Cities, towns and villages

  • Rhodes – The largest city on the island and seat of the local government
  • Afandou  – One of the big villages on the island. The golf course of Rhodes is situated in this area along with a long beach
  • Archangelos  – The second largest town on the island
  • Asklipio – inland village, site of an old church and a castle
  • Falirak – Rhodes’ action resort. Go there to party, everything else is better somewhere else. The hotels north from Faliraki are much quieter. Hotels near the water park do not interest clubbers, and are really family friendly. Nice beaches, a lot less winds than on the west coast and really good public transport.
  • Fanes – Rhodes’ wind surfing and kite surfing resort. A small fisher’s harbour, one five stars hotel, a lot of surfing. The hotel is really family friendly. Nice beach, summer winds, small tavernas and good public transport.
  • Gennadi – Around 64 km from Rhodes Old Town and nearby to Prasonisi, attracts several keen surfers. Among the last unspoiled stretches of coastline left on Rhodes.
  • Archangelos – Small former fishing village next to Lindos. A chain of restaurants surrounds an enclosed beach.
  • Ialysos – Blue waters, a seemingly endless organized beach, big hotel complexes as well as smaller friendly ones, shops of all kinds, and many night-clubs. The ideal conditions of the region, important international windsurfing competitions often take place here.
  • Ialysos – West coast resorts, close to Paradisi and Tholos, nearby to the airport and Rhodes city.
  • Faliraki – snorkeling and resort hotels.
  • Laerma  – inland village near some monuments, contains a few restaurants, inland from Lindos via Lardos. This village has been continuously inhabited since the Pre-Hellenic period. The Monastery Taxiarchis Michail is 4 km southwest of Laerma and is the largest monastery on Rhodes
  • Lindos – the market square of that town has restaurants and shops, nearby to Lindos.
  • Lindos – Picturesque village, site of important ancient acropolis.
  • Lindos – A smaller tourist resort close to Lindos. It started as a small collection of farms and private residences, but has grown into a town in its own right.
  • Theologos – A traditional village

Other destinations

  • Castle of Monolithos – If you are staying on the east coast, drive to Gennadi. North of the village, take the road across the island via Vati to Apollakia. The drive can be windy for moped riders, but the beautiful vistas make up for the work. Apollakia is not very special but has a couple of nice tavernas if you feel like having a refreshment. South of the village is a gas station, which you should use in case you are on a moped. Go on to Monolithos. Behind the village there is the actual attraction, which you will see from the road: the Castle of Monolithos on a 240-m-high rock. Do not forget to go to the actual site, which does not offer much architecture-wise, but provides you with splendid views across the west coast. To the north-west, you can see the Castle of Kalki.

Understand

Rhodes is a major tourist attraction for the seekers of sunny beaches. While many of its beaches are gravel, not sand; the island can boast 300 or more sun days in a year. Consequently, you will stumble into tourists and hotels and beaches full of deck chairs for rent, into shops and restaurants that cater to these tourists. It can be overwhelming at times. If this bothers you, Rhodes is probably not for you. Still, there are some areas where mass tourism has not yet penetrated too much. And there are advantages too, accommodation on Rhodes itself can be purchased for relatively low prices, and most of the locals speak at least English and German and often some other languages, like Swedish, French, Turkish, Italian or even Finnish. Look for bays, beaches frequented by Greeks and areas at or beyond Lindos.

History of Rhodes

Modern bronze deer statues in Mandraki harbor, where the Colossus of Rhodes may have stood

Rhodes has one of the longest and most splendid histories of any place in the world. Inhabited since Neolithic times, the island had important Bronze Age settlements, and at the dawn of the historical era was already famous for its three powerful cities of Lindos, Ialysos, and Kameiros, as mentioned in Homer. In 408 bce these three cities joined to found the island’s capital city, also called Rhodes. Rhodes city and island played a vigorous role in subsequent ancient Greek and Roman history, its most memorable episode doubtless being the prolonged siege of the city by Demetrios Poliokertes in 305 BCE.

In Hellenistic times Rhodes became extremely prosperous through trade and was one of the most influential cultural centers of the Greek world. Later as a province of the Roman empire Rhodes’ influence declined, though it was still an important regional capital and was one of the earliest centers of Christianity.

Rhodes later became part of the Byzantine Empire and from the 7th century on fell under the general eclipse of the Dark Ages. Later in the Middle Ages, Rhodes’ importance again increased, as it came under the influence first of the Venetians, then of the Genoese, and finally of the Knights of Saint John, an organization of Crusaders who took over parts of Palestine but were later expelled by the Saracens and the Knights Templar and took refuge in Rhodes, wresting control of the island from the Genoese in 1306, ruling for two centuries, and building Rhodes once again into a major maritime power, until the island was conquered by Süleyman the Magnificent in 1523, becoming part of the Ottoman Empire.

Tourist information

The local tourist information office for the Dodecanese Islands is in Rhodes city at Makariou & Papagou Corner (opposite the New Market). ☎ +30 2241 410 44335, +30 2241 410 44336, (Fax +30 2241 026955).

Talk

Greek is the native language of the people of Rhodes. However, due to the high level of tourism English, and to a lesser extent German, is likely to be spoken by most people the traveler comes into contact with. The local dialect can be described as a ‘sing-song’, with strong Turkish and Italian overtones. Many words used by Rodites (Rhodians) will not be readily understood by mainland Greeks.

Get in

By boat

Rhodes is accessible via ferry from Symi, Tilos, and Bodrum, Fethiye, Datça and Marmaris in Turkey.

Cruise ships dock at the Commercial Port, east of Rhodes’s Old Town.

All ferry and high-speed ferry companies: schedules, connections, availability and prices, between Rhodes, other Greek islands, Turkey (Fethiye, Marmaris or Bodrum) & Piraeus port (Athens) is here. Only one ferry company which is Yeşil Marmaris has daily schedule from Rhodes to Marmaris.

By plane

The island is served by Rhodes International Airport, “Diagoras” (Greek: Κρατικός Αερολιμένας Ρόδου, “Διαγόρας”) or Diagoras International Airport . The airport is situated on the west coast about 14 km from Rhodes Town.

There are regular flights to and from AthensThessaloniki, and Crete. During the months of July and August Astra Airlines flies from Thessaloniki. There are daily flights from Athens airport by Olympic Air and Aegean Airlines. Also from Crete (Heraklion) there are daily flights by Sky Express. During the months of July and August Astra Airlines flies from Thessaloniki.

Flights to Rhodes

Cheap Flights to Rhodes

Origin Departure date Return date Find Ticket

London

30.06.2021

21.07.2021

Tickets from 77

Athens

29.11.2020

03.12.2020

Tickets from 96

Cologne

09.10.2021

19.10.2021

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Berlin

21.08.2021

28.08.2021

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Heraklion

24.01.2021

27.01.2021

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Vienna

19.12.2020

08.01.2021

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Frankfurt

17.07.2021

31.07.2021

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Istanbul

20.03.2021

28.03.2021

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Saint Petersburg

04.09.2021

09.09.2021

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Kiev

06.05.2021

13.05.2021

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Moscow

21.04.2021

28.04.2021

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Rome

04.12.2020

11.12.2020

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Mulhouse

13.05.2021

22.05.2021

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Dublin

06.07.2021

13.07.2021

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Amsterdam

23.07.2021

01.08.2021

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Stockholm

16.07.2021

22.07.2021

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Kaunas

14.08.2021

28.08.2021

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Warsaw

24.08.2021

03.09.2021

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Cagliari

01.07.2021

12.07.2021

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Venice

14.08.2021

21.08.2021

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Manchester

14.06.2021

15.06.2021

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Tallinn

27.05.2021

02.06.2021

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Krakow

19.07.2021

24.07.2021

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Tel Aviv-Yafo

12.05.2021

19.05.2021

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Glasgow

09.06.2021

16.06.2021

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Poznan

07.06.2021

13.06.2021

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Liverpool

13.09.2021

27.09.2021

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Paris

07.08.2021

13.08.2021

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Dusseldorf

08.10.2021

17.10.2021

Tickets from 233

Stuttgart

16.12.2020

05.01.2021

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From May till October charter airlines fly directly to Rhodos from many European airports.

Get around

By bus

All public bus lines radiate from Rhodes town and reach almost every relevant place throughout the island.

The main bus terminal in Rhodes city is the Neá Agorá (New Market). Buses run by both companies stop there, but ticket booths, as well as timetables and prices, are distinct. Rhodes town lines are run by Roda, but have a separate stop, along Mandraki sea promenade, across the street from the new market. One interesting line is n° 5, which goes up to the Achropolis, price €1.

Tickets can also be bought in the bus from a cashier or directly from the driver. Keep your ticket until the end of your voyage. The price of a bus ticket will depend on the destination. For example, a trip from Rhodes city to Faliraki will cost €2.

Bus stops on the road are marked by a sign, but do not hesitate to signal a bus driver that you wish to board. The buses are often very full and so remember to be actively moving backwards in the buses. Sometimes the driver jumps out and peeks in from the middle door to urge tourists to move backwards. Only part of the bus stops have the timetables displayed, and the buses are often late. Also, note that most villages and resorts have more than one line passing through and stopping in different places. For example Faliraki has got three, one along the main street, one at the town center, and one right along the sea promenade. make sure your bus goes to your preferred stop, or you’ll need to walk a bit.

By taxi

Taxis on Rhodes are dark blue with white roofs. There is a list of expected taxi charges you can obtain from the tourist information office. For example, a trip from Rhodes city to Faliraki should cost around €18; the trip from the Airport to Rhodes city about €23. The minimum fare for each trip is €4, the taximeter starts at €1.22. Never let the driver turn off the meter. Each suitcase will be also be charged, €0.50-0.60 each.

You can radio a taxi via telephone number ☎ +30 2241 069800. This adds a standard surcharge of €1.90. Waiting fare is €11.14 per hr. Between midnight and 05:00 you will have to pay twice the normal rates. You can book ahead to avoid delays at high traffic times such as weekends.

Within Rhodes city limits, fixed rates are applied. If you get a taxi from one of the taxi stations or stop one in the street, the fare is €5. At the main taxi station, close to the New Market (Mandraki), there are hosts that try to cut down waiting time by making sure that the taxis doesn’t leave half empty – especially if you are going a bit further. If you share a taxi within the Rhodes city limits the fare is €4.

Caution Note: Taxi drivers will sometimes turn off their meters and charge an arbitrary amount at the destination. Make sure they don’t do this. Always inquire about the approximate price before you get in.

By car

It is not worth the hassle to bring your own car to the island, although it is in theory possible. You can rent a car at the airport or via any hotel and at many local dealers. Asphalt highways will allow you to reach the entire island, although roads in the interior – especially the south – may turn out to be little more than dirt paths.

By motorcycle

Motorbikes and mopeds are popular alternatives to cars. Especially mopeds are frequently used by local youths and can go to many places that cars cannot go – for example the twisted narrow streets of Rhodes city. An additional advantage is that they are cheap to rent – €10-15 a day is the usual price.

If you start a day-trip with a moped, make sure you do so on a full tank, as gas stations are sometimes hard to find. An extra stop at a gas station can save a lot of nerves. When renting a moped, check if the profile of the tyres is ok and if the brakes work properly. If it is the last vehicle in store, be suspicious – it could be the one that needs a repair badly. Though helmets are not required on the streets, (although you might well be stopped and fined €50 if you are not wearing a helmet on the main roads) it might be a good idea to ask your rent-a-bike for one, especially if you intend to drive on streets with more traffic.

See

Image of Destination Guide
Odos Ippoton, the Avenue of the Knights in Rhodes Old Town

No trip to Rhodes is complete without at least briefly seeing the walled fortress of medieval Rhodes. A UNESCO World Heritage site and one of the best preserved medieval walled towns in Europe, the crusading knights were based here for a while before the city was captured by the Ottomans. Impressive on the outside, the Palace of the Grand Masters is not worth the entry fee, so head to the Archaeological Museum and then explore the back streets on foot.

If you’re into castles, Rhodes has a lot to offer with its medieval history. LindosKastellos and Monolithos all have castles. There are medieval remains at Filerimos Hill including a monastery and a chapel, and good views over the north of the island.

  • Asklipio (inland from Kiotari.) In the little church there are fascinating displays, honoring the continuity of the cult of healing from ancient times to a modern midwife and nurse. In Greek mythology, Asklepios was the son of the god Apollo who created the art of medicine.
  • Cape Prasonisi. The southernmost tip of Rhodes. There is a peninsular connected to the main island by a sand bar. Unless you have a 4×4, think twice before driving your car across the sand bar. It becomes progressively less solid and it is easy to get stuck there in the sand.
  • Epta Piges. (Seven springs) and that is literally all there is to see there except for a short forest walking trail. In the hot summer months, the cool shade provides a pleasant respite from the sun.
  • Kamiros. Ancient ruins.
  • Tsambika Peak.
  • The Valley of the Butterflies. Since the butterflies – which are actually coloured moths – in this area need quietude for their procreation and since the area is visited by many visitors, the population of the Petaloudes “butterflies” is constantly on the decline; even to a degree that it does not make any sense anymore to go there, as you will hardly see any of the moths. It is still a beautiful area regardless.

Do

  • Sunbathing
  • Swimming
  • Snorkeling
  • Diving
  • Surfing and ‘kitesurfing on the west coast and especially on the south end of the island
  • Many hotels will offer activity programs
  • Most tour operators will offer excursions
  • Climb Mt Attavyros. A challenging 2-3 hr climb to the island’s highest point (1215 m). On leaving Embonas on the road towards Siana, drive up one of the agricultural roads on the left and find a place to park. On foot, you continue up through the wine growing area in the obvious direction. There is no explicit marked path but red paint on rocks towards the top marks the best route. It is a steep climb with many large loose rocks. The descent can be especially tricky. It is also possible to drive up the mountain: the approach road comes from the South.
  • Prasonisi Surfing and quiet un-spoiled beaches distant from the main tourism areas. This coastal region beach is beginning to develop with new hotels and villas belonging to people from Rhodes. The sandy shore from Gennadi to Prasonisi is among the last unspoiled stretches of coastline left on Rhodes.
  • Kamiros and Mt. Profitis Ilias

Beaches

There is a good variety of beaches on Rhodes. The east side of the island has almost continuous sandy beaches with calm waters. Beaches on the west are mostly more stony. The wind mostly comes in from the west and also the sea tends to be somewhat rougher to the west so that side of the island is better suited to surfing or kite boarding. Some beaches in Rhodes are also unofficial nudist beaches.

  • Rhodes Town.
  • Lindos. The stunningly beautiful town beach on the bay. Very trendy, so wear your thong bikini here if you want to fit in.
    Image of Destination GuideLindos Beach, as seen from Lindos village
  • Kalithea. Just north of Faliraki, this spa was built by Italians. It is very pleasant spot but can be crowded. Work is ongoing to build what looks like it will be a modern spa adjacent to the original buildings. A number of separate beaches, each seemingly with their own taverna lie just south of the spa.
  • Faliraki. A long sandy beach with plenty of tavernas to choose from. There is also no shortage of people to rent jet skis from or to organise other activities. At the southern end, there is a quiter, more rocky beach but the sea there is inconveniently shallow for swimmers. The only legal nudist beach on the island which has excellent facilities including sunbed hire, toilets and food and drink outlets is also found to the south of Faliraki.
  • Ladiko Beach (Anthony Quinn Bay). This is a very scenic spot. On one side of the bay is a relatively small beach. The other side is rocky but a man made platform provides further space for sunbathing and access to the sea.
  • Afandou Beach 
    Image of Destination Guide
  • Kolymbia Beach.
  • Tsambika Beach. On the far right of the beach near the rocks nude sunbathing is tolerated.
  • Gennadi Beach. This area and nearby Prasonisi attracts surfers. The village resort is peaceful and quiet. Virgin sands, hotels, and beach bars are a feature. Gennadi only began to be developed relatively recently. The main coastal road along the beach is developing with new hotels and villas belonging to people from Rhodes. Unexplored beaches stretch along the sandy shore from Gennadi to Prasonisi. This area is among the last unspoiled stretches of coastline left on the island.
  • Agia Marina Beach.

Buy

  • Sponges
  • Ceramic watch for the many “Keramik factory” outlets along the roads).
  • Olive oil
  • Bottle of wine– local wines are famous (e.g. CAIR) and tasty
  • Religious icons
  • Jewelry stores are common, particularly in Rhodes Town
  • Umbrellas – manufactured by the two large industries of the island (there is, though, a popular “joke” souvenir – on an island with 300+ sun days a year, these are rarely needed)
  • Colorful sea shells are a popular souvenir item, but very many of them are actually imported, and have no authentic connection to the island whatsoever.
  • Many brand name products for sale in the tourist shops may be fakes and/or unlicensed (t-shirts, towels, hand bags, and so on)

Eat

See the Eat section under each town or region of Rhodes for specific listings.

Drink

The tap water is drinkable and restaurants will serve glasses of ice water upon request. Local drinks include Mythos (beer) and Ouzo. Local wine is cheap and excellent.

Bars and restaurant listings can be found in the articles covering the different towns and regions of Rhodes

Where to stay in Rhodes

See individual towns for more accommodation options. For budget travellers, there is no longer a campground on the island but there is a youth hostel in Rhodes Old Town.

Hotels Rhodes Island: Popularity

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

Sunday Hotel

★★★

-25%

6448

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Stay safe in Rhodes

Rhodes is generally, quite safe, however vigilance is required in Faliraki, infamous for the lewd behavior of young, drunk, mainly British partiers attracted to the cheap alcohol and large numbers of small nightclubs. A string of crimes committed by these young tourists against locals, as well as against other tourists, gained national attention in the summer of 2003; they ranged from vandalism to serious acts of violence. Following this the local Police increased their presence to successfully crack down on such behavior – zero tolerance of bad behaviour is now in place. Expect a night in the cells and some heavy handed handling from the commando trained officers. For families with young children the best times to visit would be daytime even up to 22:00 local time when the clubbers tend to come out en masse.

Go next

  • Daily excursions via boat to all the Dodecanese Islands (Symi, Tilos, Halki, Kos, Leros, Kalymnos, Kastellorizo and other islands are offered from Rhodes city
  • A ferry to Marmaris in Turkey is also available

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Greece

Athens Coronavirus COVID-19 Update in Greece

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Named after Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom, Athens is the oldest, and maybe liveliest, capital in Europe. The urban city area features a bit more than 4 million residents, according to the latest census in 2011; however, every true Athenian will insist that the capital boasts half of Greece’s total population (which is about 11 million people).

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

Athens is often considered as an one-day stop-over, before starting island hopping; however, while summers in Athens can be a nightmare due to the combination of high temperatures, air pollution and severe lack of greenery, it is still worth a few days on its own. Balancing between European elegance and Balkan temperament, the Greek capital reveals its true self through lazy walks among ancient ruins, people watching during a typical Athenian half-day-long coffee and endless bar hopping until dawn.

The first pre-historic settlements were constructed in 3000 BC around the hill of Acropolis. According to legend the King of Athens, Theseus, unified the ten tribes of early Athens into one kingdom in around 1230 BC. This process of synoikismos – bringing together in one home – created the largest and wealthiest state on the Greek mainland, but it also created a larger class of people excluded from political life by the nobility.

By the 7th century BCE, social unrest had become widespread, and the Areopagus appointed Draco to draft a strict new law code (hence “draconian”). When this failed, they appointed Solon, with a mandate to create a new constitution (594). This was the great beginning of a new social revolution, which was the result of the democracy under Clisthenes (508).

In the 5th century BCE, Athens reached the peak of its fame. It was the most powerful Greek city-state, and the center of Greek cultural life, hosting perhaps the greatest cultural advances in all of human history. Fields of study like science, philosophy, history, and medicine were developed for the first time by Athenian scholars in this period, known as Athens’ “golden age”.

Later on, Athens became part of the Macedonian empire under Alexander, and still later part of the Roman empire. While it was no longer politically significant, its intellectual reputation gave it a special status until, in the year 529, Emperor Justinian ordered Athens’ academies to be closed, and the empire’s intellectual center moved to Constantinople.

Athens was thriving and prosperous during the Crusades, actually benefiting from the Italian trade during this period, however this fruitful period was short-lived, as Greece suffered badly under the Ottoman Empire, only to recover in the 19th century as the capital of independent Greece. In modern times, the Athens urban area has grown to a population of 3 million. Athens has turned into a large and bustling city, but as a result it also suffers from congestion, pollution, and poverty.

Modern Olympic Games

Athens hosted the 2004 Summer Olympic Games. While most of the sporting venues were outside of the city – in various locations throughout Attica- the entire urban area of Athens underwent major lasting changes that have improved the quality of life for visitors and residents alike. Aside from the excellent transportation infrastructure that was completed in time for the 2004 Olympics (from new freeways to light rail systems), the city’s historic center underwent serious renovation. Most notable among the city’s facelift projects are the Unification of Archaeological Sites (which connects the city’s classical-era ruins and monuments to each other through a network of friendly pedestrianized streets) and the restoration of the picturesque neoclassical Thissio and Pláka districts.

The ancient Olympic Games took place in Olympia from 776 BCE to 394 AD. It is a lengthy day trip from Athens to visit Olympia, but quite interesting.

Architecture

Athens was just a small provincial village when it was chosen in the 1830s to serve as the national capital of the modern Greek State. Although it had a prestigious past, the city’s political, economic and cultural importance had declined over the centuries, leaving behind only its classical ruins as a reminder of better times. With the decision to move the national capital from Nafplio to Athens, architects and city planners were hired to build a new city next to the classical ruins, with grand neoclassical homes and public buildings, large city squares, green spaces, and wide avenues, making a conscious, decisive turn from the city’s Ottoman past. The city regained its importance in Greek civilization, and by 1900 had evolved into a very attractive cosmopolitan city, with abundant neoclassical architecture harking to the nation’s past.

The 20th century however, marked the rapid development of Athens. The city suffered minor damage during WWII, and suffered extensive urban planning in the decades that followed, as the nation rapidly industrialized and urbanized. In the 1960s and 1970s, many 19th century neoclassical buildings, often small and private, were demolished to make way for office buildings, often designed by great Greek architects. The city also expanded outward through rash development, particularly towards the west, as its population grew by absorbing job-seekers from the provinces. With the onset of the automobile, public officials reduced the city’s public transportation services without foreseeing the traffic gridlock and smog that would menace the city by the 1980s.

By the late 1980s and early 1990s, the city’s reality led to a rude awakening among local and national officials and, coupled with the country’s new found remarkable prosperity, large scale projects began to slowly regenerate the city and undo some of the damage of recent decades. Over the course of the next 15 years, money was poured into new transportation infrastructure projects, the restoration of surviving neoclassical buildings, the gentrification of the city’s historical center and the renovation of many former industrial areas and the city’s coastline. The restoration of charming neoclassical buildings in the city’s historical center has been accompanied by the construction of attractive post-modern buildings in newer districts; both of which have begun to improve the aesthetic essence of the city. Athens today is ever evolving, forging a brand new identity for the 21st century.

Weather in Athens

Spring and late autumn are the best times to visit Athens. Summer can be extremely hot and dry during heatwaves, but this rarely happens. Winter is definitely low season, with the occasional rainy or snowy day, but also an ideal time to save money while enjoying the city without countless other tourists.

Whilst peak traffic hour can be a bit smoggy on the main roads, on most sunny days the skies are azure blue. The main reason attributed for the pollution of Athens is because the city is enclosed by mountains in a basin which does not allow the smog to leave. The government’s ban on diesel vehicles within Athens and the early 1990s initiatives to improve car emissions have greatly contributed to better atmospheric conditions in the basin.

Orientation

The sprawling city is bounded on three sides by Mt. Ymettos, Mt. Parnitha and Mt. Pendeli; whilst inside Athens are twelve hills [the seven historical are: Acropolis, Areopagus, Hill of Philopappus, Observatory Hill (Muses Hill), Pnyx, Lycabettus, Tourkovounia (Anchesmus)], the Acropolis and Lykavittos being the most prominent. These hills provide a refuge from the noise and commotion of the crowded city streets, offering amazing views down to Saronic Gulf, Athens’ boundary with the Aegean Sea on its southern side. The streets of Athens (signposted in Greek and English) now melt imperceptibly into Piraeus, the city’s ancient, and still bustling, port.

Places of interest to travellers can be found within a relatively small area surrounding the city centre at Syntagma Square (Plateia Syntagmatos). This epicentre is surrounded by the districts of the Plaka to the south, Monastiraki to the west, Kolonaki to the east and Omonia to the north. Further afield is the port of Athens, the Piraeus.

The Acropolis is the ancient high city of Athens, a prominent plateaued rock perched high above the modern city with commanding views and an amazing array of ancient architecture, mostly from the Classical period of Ancient Greece, the most famous of which is the Parthenon. A visit to Athens is not complete without visiting the Acropolis; hundreds of tourists each day accordingly make the pilgrimage.

Gentrified during the 1990s and now very popular with tourists, Plaka is a charming historic district at the foot of the Acropolis, with its restored 19th-century neoclassical homes, pedestrianized streets, shops and restaurants, and picturesque ruins from the city’s Roman era. Thissio, to the west side of the Acropolis, is very similar and now houses many restaurants and cafes. Between the two is Monastiraki, a very bohemian district increasingly popular with tourists, with stores selling a variety of items including antiques, cookware, souvenirs, arts and crafts, movie posters, punk culture, funky clothing, and pretty much anything you can think of. Another part of Plaka is Anafiotika and is on the northernmost place. There you will find the first university of Athens before it was relocated in central Athens. Its an oasis of calm and quietness, and there are many green spaces which are part of the green space of Acropolis.

Plaka’s boundaries are not precisely defined. Clear borders are the Ancient Agora and Plateia Monastiraki on the west, the Acropolis and Dhionysiou Areopayitou street on the south, the Temple of Olympian Zeus and Leoforos Amalias on the south-east, and the west part of Mitropoleos street, up to the cathedral on the north (but Mitropoleos street and Leoforos Amalias, though boundaries, shouldn’t be considered part of Plaka, since they have a modern and fairly non-descript atmosphere). The north-eastern and eastern boundaries are a bit less well defined, but if you’re south of Apollonos street and west of Nikis street you’ll probably feel like you’re still in Plaka.

Syntagma Square is named after the Greek constitution (syntagma) that was proclaimed from the balcony of the royal palace that overlooks the square on 3 September 1843. The former palace has housed the Greek parliament since 1935.

Syntagma Square is a good point from which to begin your orientation in the city, and has been beautified within the last few years ago, and the manic Athenian traffic has been re-routed. it contains cafes, restaurants, fast food outlets, a new metro stop, airline offices.. The square serves as an occasional rallying place for demonstrations and public celebrations.

Omonia Square (Plateia Omonias) is the centre of Athens, and is composed of the actual square together with the surrounding streets, open areas and assemblage of grand buildings that include banks and offices. The neighbouring area of Exarcheia (Εξάρχεια) to the north, dominated by the Athens Polytechnic and its famous band of anarchists, is a bohemian district with lots of bars and clubs visited by students, intellectuals and people who are into alternative culture. Kolonaki is near Lykavittos Hill. The district’s borders are not very sharply defined; it covers the south and southeast slopes of Lykavettos Hill north of Vassilisis Sofias Avenue. Kolonaki is the posh area of central Athens. Traditionally the home of the in-town rich, it’s the location of a number of foreign embassies and several prominent archaeological schools, including The American School and The British School. It also has the city’s greatest concentration of trendy fashion boutiques, and many, mostly upscale, cafes, bars and restaurants.

Get in

Travel by plane to Athens

Athens airport is a major hub in the Aegean, Balkan and East Mediterranean regions. American, Air Canada, Delta, Emirates, and United maintain non-stop flights from North America (some are only seasonal), while a large number of European carriers fly direct into Athens.

Opened in 2001 as part of the infrastructure improvements in preparation for the Olympics, and is allegedly now one of the more attractive and efficient major European airports, though some old Athenian hands say they miss the messy atmosphere of the old Hellenikon. The airport has the usual array of food stands, duty-free shops, lounges, and other airport services. Free Wi-Fi is limited to 45 min. Luggage storage, run by Pacific Travel, can be found in the end of left-hand wing, arrivals level. Storage time varies from 6 to 36 hr, no automatic lockers. There is also a locker facility at Syntagma Square, central Athens (Leaveyourluggage.gr). | Opened in 2001 as part of the infrastructure improvements in preparation for the Olympics, and is allegedly now one of the more attractive and efficient major European airports, though some old Athenian hands say they miss the messy atmosphere of the old Hellenikon. The airport has the usual array of food stands, duty-free shops, lounges, and other airport services. Free Wi-Fi is limited to 45 min. Luggage storage, run by Pacific Travel, can be found in the end of left-hand wing, arrivals level. Storage time varies from 6 to 36 hr, no automatic lockers.

There is a tourist information office in Arrivals, they can provide information about Greek ferries.

There is also a small museum on the top floor with an interesting history on Athens, and a space for temporary exhibits.

Getting there:

  • By Metro to the town center, €10 one way. Group tickets (2 or 3 persons) are also available and they provide some discount (see below). The airport Metro line is an extension of Line 3 (blue line) that takes you to the central Syntagma and Monastiráki stations. Metro riders must change trains at Doukisis Plakentias station.
At the airport, both metro trains and suburban trains pass from the same platform. If you are travelling to the city centre, you should take the metro trains.
Don’t forget to validate your ticket before going down to the platform and boarding a train (there are validation machines at the top of the escalators in the ticket hall). Failure to validate your ticket at the start of the journey can mean a fine of up to €200. The ticket inspectors are rigorous and won’t hesitate to call for police assistance if you start to object.
Not all Metro trains from Athens go to the airport; typically the airport trains run every half hour, while trains in the intervals don’t go the whole route. Airport trains are indicated on the schedule and by an airplane logo on the front of the train, they are also announced by the signs on the metro platform. It’s useful to go to the Metro station the day before, explain to the agent (most speak English) when you need to be at the airport, and ask what time you should catch the airport train from that station. You can also get this information at the airport metro station, which has a desk staffed most hours by someone who speaks English. It’s possible but not necessary to buy your ticket in advance; buying in advance though means you won’t risk missing your train if you find at the last minute you don’t have change for the ticket machines and have to stand in a line to buy it from the agent.
  • By Suburban Railway to Larissis Railway Station for €6 via change at Ano Liossia Station. Suburban trains are not as fast as the metro trains. A change at Ano Liossia to Line 2 (red) can take you to The Omónia and Syntagma stations; trains to Northern Greece and the Peloponnese depart from nearby Larissis station. Or change at Doukissis Plakentias to Line 3 (blue) of the metro to get to Monastiraki and Syntagma stations.
  • By express bus: X93 to Kifissos Coach Station, X95 to Syntagma Square (Lines 2 and 3), X96 to Piraeus Port (Line 1) and X97 to Elliniko metro station (Line 2) for €6.00. It takes 45 min to 1½ hr depending on traffic. Buses, unlike Metro, operate 24 hours a day. When leaving to the airport early from Syntagma (before the metro opens), tickets can be bought at a kiosk next to the bus stop.
  • By local bus: an unnamed bus departs frequently in front of the Sofitel Hotel to Koropi metro station (€1.80, 15 min). From there you can take the metro to Athens (€1.40). According to the metro website the ride is €10 but as of late 2017 the station official confirmed that it is only €1.40. You can also take local bus 308 from Koropi metro for the same price.
  • By taxi: if you take a taxi be careful. Taxi rides to the centre cost €38 during the day and €50 during the night. Ask if the price includes toll costs.

Getting around

  • By metro: Athen’s metro includes three lines, the green, the blue and the red; the underground network is not yet efficiently developed, but does cover most of the city’s points of interest. Tickets cost 1.40 euros, are valid for 90 minutes and can also be used in buses and trolley buses. The blue line links to Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, but a special 8-euro ticket is required. The metro runs between 5am and 12am from Sunday to Thursday and from 5am to 2am on Fridays and Saturdays.
  • By bus/trolley: Athens feature a comprehensive bus and trolley-bus network. Time schedules usually depend on the route, however most buses run between 5.30am and 12am. A few 24-hour routes are available, including X95 between Syntagma Square and the airport.
  • By tram: The tram was introduced to Athenians in 2004 and was fashioned in order to link the city center with the Olympic facilities in southeastern suburbs, which were not served by metro; it is still the most comfortable way to get to the southeastern suburbs, given that you are not in a hurry.
  • By taxi: Taxis are still quite inexpensive compared to other European capitals. A fixed price is set for rides from the airport to the city center: a 35-euro tariff on day shift (from 5am to 12am) and a 50-euro tariff on night shift.

Travel by bus to Athens

Regional coaches (KTEL) connect Athens to other cities in Greece. The fleet of buses has been upgraded, which makes the journey friendly and safe. For some destinations one can also use the buses of the railroad company (OSE, see next paragraph) that might be international, but can also be used for in-country transport. At times there are collaborations with companies from adjacent countries such as Turkey, Bulgaria, Serbia, North Macedonia and Albania, so it’s advisable to ask on both the bus and the train companies about the available options.

From Albania

Several travel agencies offer bus service between Tirana and Athens, also stopping at several other cities in Albania. Cost is usually €30 between Albania and Athens (same cost regardless of the city in Albania).

  • Alb Trans, +30 210 520 21 85, albtrans06@yahoo.com, €25, http://www.albtrans.net stops in the following cities: Tirana, Durres, Kavaje, Rrogozhine, Lushnje, Berat, Fier, Ballsh, Krasta, Memaliaj, Tepelene, Athens.
  • Albatrans, albatrans.com.al, info@albatrans.com.al, +355 42 259 204, €30
  • top-lines.al, Albania: +355 42233050 albtoplines@hotmail.com, Greece: +30 2105203350-1 toplines@otenet.gr
  • Papadakis Bros S.A., +30 210 52 02 551-3 (Athens), +355 42 22 41 03 (Tirana)
  • Osumi Travel, 210 52 49 268 (Athens), 42 2255 491-2272 644 (Tirana), €30, or €25 between Gjirokaster and Athens, osumitravel@live.com
  • Alvavel, +355 0422 34629 (Tirana), +355 0542 42476 (Elbasan), +355 0822 42847 (Korca), +355 0522 34446 (Durres), +30 210 5222436 (Athens), €30

Travel by train to Athens

The national rail service, Trainose, connects Athens to other cities in Greece, however the national railroad system is limited compared to other European countries, in effect having only two lines. One goes south to the Pelopponese. The other goes to the north, connecting Athens with the second major city in Greece, Thessaloniki. From there the line continues further to the north and all the way to the east, passing through many other cities of northern Greece and eventually reaching Istanbul.

There are two types of train you can use; normal, slow, type of train equipped with beds, and the so-called new ‘Intercity’ type which is more expensive because of a ‘quality supplement fee’ that grows with distance. For example, travelling from Athens to Thessaloniki by the ‘Intercity’ type will save one hour at most, but the ticket will be almost twice the price. ‘Intercity’ tends to be more reliable, yet more ‘bumpy’ than the normal train. As of late 2014 there are international trains to Belgrade, Serbia and Sofia, Bulgaria via Thessaloniki.

Travel by boat to Athens

The port of Piraeus acts as the marine gateway to Athens, and is served by many ferries. Cruise ships also regularly visit, especially during warm months. Generally, pedestrian ferry users will be closer than cruise passengers to the Metro station providing access to central Athens; walking distances can vary considerably.

Cruise passengers on larger ships usually reach the main cruise terminal by port shuttle bus; otherwise, it can be a non-trivial walk. Smaller ships (e.g., 1200 or fewer passengers) may dock near the terminal…an easy walk. From the terminal, pedestrians face a safe, level walk of over a mile to the Piraeus Metro station; taxis are readily available to go there, but are not inexpensive.

Public transport in Athens has improved by leaps and bounds since the year 2000. The simple €1.40 (“integrated”) ticket lets you travel on any means of transport—metro, suburban trains, trams, trolleybuses, buses—with unlimited transfers anywhere within Athens (except the metro airport line east of Doukissis Plakentias and the airport buses) for 60 minutes, and you can also get a €4 ticket valid for 24 hours, or a 3-day “tourist” ticket for €20 that includes one round-trip to the airport.

By metro

The Athens Metro is efficient and attractive, and generally the only friendly way to get around Athens. Many metro stations (i.e. Syntagma) exhibit artifacts found during construction. Eating and drinking is forbidden in the metro system. During rush hour, it can become very crowded. There are three lines:

  • Line : Piraeus – Kifissia, connects the port of Piraeus and the northern suburbs of Athens (Kifisia station) via the city centre. Be sure that you keep an eye on your personal stuff when using this line, and be prepared for people getting in the train and asking for money.
  • Line : Anthoupoli – Elliniko connects western and southern Athens via Athens centre.
  • Line : Aghia Marina – Doukissis Plakentias – Airport connects the western suburbs with the eastern suburbs (Halandri and Doukissis Plakentias stations) and the International Airport.

Validate your ticket at the validation machines upon entering the station. Failure to do so will entail a hefty fine if you are caught by ticket inspectors. The standard metro fare is €1.40 (as of June 2016) for trips between all stations except the Airport line, east of Doukissis Plakentias. This allows travel with all means of public transport and unlimited transfers for 70 minutes.

A 24-hour ticket for all public transport in Athens, apart from the Airport line, costs €4.50. This needs to be validated only once, at the start of the first journey. The standard fare to or from the Airport is €10 (as of August 2016), €18 for a return trip within 48 hours, €14 for a one-way trip for a 2-person group and €20 for a one-way trip for a 3-person group.

There are often several entrances to the stations and often they go straight to the platform, so remember which entrance is for which. It is open from 05:00 to midnight.

By suburban railway

The Suburban Railway (Proastiakos by Trainose) is a new addition to Athens’s public transportations network. The line starts at Piraeus, passes through the main line train station (Larissis) in central Athens, and forks at Ano Liosia west to Corinth and Kiato and east towards the Airport.

By tram

The new Athens Tram connects the city centre with the southern suburbs and has connections with the metro lines. There are three tram lines:

  • Line : Peace and Friendship Stadium – Asklipeio Voulas Hospital connects Faliro with the southern suburbs and runs along the coastal zone.
  • Line : Syntagma – Peace and Friendship Stadium connects the city centre with Faliro.
  • Line : Syntagma – Asklipeio Voulas Hospital connects the city centre with the coastal zone and the southern suburbs.

Ticket prices are the same with Athens Metro (€1.40 for 60 minutes)

Travel by bus to Athens

Athens is served by a network of diesel buses, natural gas buses and electric trolley buses run by the Athens Urban Transport Organisation. The integrated ticket costs €1.40 and allows for multiple trips within 70 minutes, including transfers to the Metro or Tram and it’s available in most kiosks. Trips to the Airport cost €5. If you tend to stay for more than a week then a weekly pass for €14 is the most cost-effective. It gives you unlimited rides on almost all public transit (bus, tram, train, subway) for 7 days. You only need to validate once, before first use. Buses will not stop unless you signal the driver by raising your arm. There are no arrival time signs in any of the stations.

By taxi

Canary yellow taxis are a common sight in Athens and are a reasonably priced way of getting around (if you can avoid the traffic jams). The starting fee is €1.19, after which the meter ticks up at €0.34/km (“rate 1”) or €0.64/km (“rate 2”), with a minimum fare of €3.20. Rate 1 applies through Athens city limits, including the airport, while rate 2 applies outside the city and from midnight to 05:00. Legal extra charges apply for calling a taxi by radio (€1.60), trips to or from the airport (€3.20) and heavy bags (€0.32). Tipping is not necessary, although it’s common to round up to the nearest full euro.

Taxi fare fraud is not as widespread as it used to be, but it still happens, so insist on the meter and make sure the rate is correct. At busy tourist locations, drivers try to con with a set rate that is ridiculously high (e.g. €20 for a short trip). In these cases, it is best to find another and again insist on the charge shown on the meter. If you feel you have been overcharged, ask for a receipt (they are obliged to give one) and take the plate number, then phone the tourist police to report the driver on 171.

Taxi drivers rarely obey the rules of the road. Expect that if you are leaving Athens on an early flight the driver will drive aggressively to get you there as quickly as possible.

Taxis are considered to be fairly cheap in Athens. Therefore, you can expect to share the ride during rush hours if you can find one, and at night after the Metro has shut down. If you hail a taxi which is already occupied (occupied taxis have a brightly lit TAXI sign on top of the car) the driver will ask where you want to go to before letting you in to join the other customers. Strikes by cabbies and public transit are common, so be prepared and watch the local news.

Travel to Athens by car

You can hire a car at the airport where most of the major international companies have a presence. There are also several large local companies which will deliver the car outside of the airport.

Travel by bicycle in Athens

Athens is not a friendly city for bicyclists, as it does not have many bicycle lanes, and the car drivers tend to drive quite aggressively. Nevertheless (or maybe because of this) riding a bicycle in Athens has become lately some sort of a political (counter-)action, especially by young people with an alternative lifestyle. In general, tourists not familiar with the terrible Athenian traffic are not advised to use a bicycle as a principal means of transport. But within the network of pedestrian streets in the historical city centre, rides are safe and can be quite enjoyable. A bike hire scheme is at its fledgling stages; its bike station is in Technopolis.

The “My City with a Bike” initiative, taken by the General Secretariat for the Youth and several NGOs, offers free conducted tours with free bikes every Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 to 15:00 all year round except for the rainy days. Booking 10 days in advance is required, either by email (admin@anthropos.gr) or phone (+30 8011 19 19 00).

On foot

With the exception of a few touristy streets, Athens is an incredibly unfriendly place to walk (compared to other Western cities). Athens’ horrendous traffic can make crossing the street in many areas a hair-raising proposition, and walking down many streets is an unfriendly experience of noise and pollution. Cars and motorbikes parked blocking the pavements (illegal but ubiquitous) can also make a stroll difficult. The humidity of summer is exhausting, and there are few parks to provide an escape from it. Fortunately, much of the traffic-plagued area of the city can be avoided by judicious use of the new Metro, which goes most places a visitor would want to see or walk around in.

However, several central streets have been pedestrianized. A mostly car-free archeological walk starts at Vasilisis Amalias Street, passes in front of the New Acropolis Museum, Acropolis, Herodion Theatre, Thiseio (Apostolou Pavlou Str), Ermou Street and ends at the popular area of Kerameikos (Gkazi) where there are many bars and clubs. Pleasant walking can also be had in Plaka, especially its upper reaches, and in much of Kolonaki. The National Garden can provide a welcome respite from the heat and noise of the city centre. Even in Plaka and Kolonaki, your walk is likely to be interrupted by loud motorcycles zooming down the narrow lanes, shattering the peace and making you worry about your safety. Wear comfortable shoes with good traction, and make sure that you leave home any high heels or similar shoes. Some sensitive archeological sites have banned heels because the pointed heels damage the soft, slippery marble that you’re walking on.

Syntagma-Panepistimio-Kolonaki

The surroundings of Syntagma Square, along with neighboring area of Panepistimio and fancy Kolonaki, form the hottest shopping district in downtown Athens. Ermou pedestrian is the most sauntered Greek shopping street, while Kolonaki is home to chic local boutiques and well-known international designer houses; elegant Athenians drink their espresso in nearby cafés and posh bars. Well-known attractions around the area include the Greek Parliament on Syntagma Square and nearby National Gardens, Benaki Museum on Queen Sofia’s Avenue and Zappion Megaron on Queen Amalia’s Avenue. The National Library, Academy of Athens and the former building of the University of Athens are located just across Panepistimio metro station. Plenty of local and international restaurants and dinners are scattered around the narrow streets besides Syntagma Square.

Sightseeing in Athensedit

At first glance, Athens seems entirely to be composed of nasty, four- to six-story concrete buildings, lacking character and badly in need of a paint, but if you look beyond that, you will find little gems tucked in among the grey. The areas at the foot of the Acropolis, Anafiotika, Plaka, Monastiraki and Thissio are home to many wonderful Neoclassical buildings, trendy and traditional cafes and shops, narrow winding streets, and incredible views of the Acropolis. Little Greek Orthodox churches are tucked in among the concrete, often in the most unexpected places. These are usually beautifully decorated with icons and brass fixtures inside, but make sure you’re appropriately dressed (no short sleeves or bare legs is a good rule of thumb, as a mark of respect).

Akropolis-Plaka-Monastiraki

The Acropolis is, naturally, the most popular spot of the city, along with neighboring Plaka and Monastiraki. Crowds of tourists on sightseeing scout mingle with locals strolling up the hill on their leisure time. This area is packed in ancient sites, including the Parthenon, Erechtheion, Propylea and Ancient Agora. Dionysiou Aeropagitou pedestrian is ideal for rambling on a sunny day and will lead you right to the New Acropolis Museum, where the marbles from the excavations at the Acropolis are exhibited. Picturesque Plaka is located right on the foot of the Acropolis, featuring narrow backstreets and charming houses from the early 20th century. Monastiraki is known for its flea market, souvenir shops and traditional taverns; street artists and performers give shows at the weekends.

The Acropolis is open daily, 08:00-19:00 during summer, 08:00-17:00 during winter. Telephone: +30 210 3214172. The normal entrance price is €20. The price is discounted or free for many categories of individuals, such as under-18s and European university students. A €30 ticket can be purchased which also provides admission to various other Athens historic sites (Acropolis and Slopes, Kerameikos and its museum, Ancient Agora and its museum, Roman Agora, Hadrian’s Library, Olympieion, The Lyceum) within five days. If possible, arrive early to avoid heavy crowds, and summer heat when relevant. The queue to buy tickets can be very long – expect to wait more than an hour. If you can, buy tickets online, the ticket is then sent by email with a QR code which will be scanned at the entrance gate. There are also a limited number of free days for the public listed each year – check Acropolis’ website.

Entrance is from the west end of the Acropolis. From the Akropoli metro stop and New Acropolis Museum, walk west along Dionysiou Areopagitou Street and take the first right on to Theorias; from the Thissio metro stop west of Monastiraki, walk west to Apostolou Pavlou Street, turn left on it, and walk south to turn left on Theorias. From Plaka, you can walk south up steep Mnisikleous Street as far as you can go and turn right on Theorias. Following European regulations, disabled access to the Acropolis can be gained by means of special paths and a purpose-built lift on the north face of the hill, only for the use of those in wheelchairs.

A canteen with a wide range of food and drink is reached before you get to the ticket kiosk – but beware: refreshments are available only at exorbitant prices. You will definitely need a bottle of water with you in the hot summer, so either bring it with you or buy it from the kiosk on Dionysiou Areopagitou Street, just outside the entrance. There are water fountains within the site, but the water isn’t always cold.

Guides can nearly always be found offering to show you around – at a price – at the point where tickets are checked. As an alternative, ask for the free leaflet published by the Archaeological Resources Fund, which includes a ground plan of the site and valuable information on the various monuments.

Additional historic sites and artifacts at the foot of the Acropolis are also included in the admission ticket.

Psiri-Thision-Keramikos

This area is the capital’s hippest entertainment hub. Local youth overflows the trendy cafes, restaurants, bars and clubs around Psiri, Thision and Gazi (Keramikos), where partying stops with the first sunlight. By daylight a different facet of the area is revealed; don’t skip a visit to the ancient cemetery of Keramikos Archeological Site, along with the Archeological Museum where the artifacts from the excavations are exhibited.

Excharcheia-Patision Str.-Metaksourgio

Excharcheia and Metaksourgio are Athens’ alternative districts. Surrounded by university faculties, Excharcheia features an underground profile and has been the anarchists’ meeting point for more than 30 years. One of the capital’s liveliest districts, it houses countless tiny inexpensive cafes and bars; young boys and girls are also likely to hang out near the little square drinking canned beer. Metaksourgio on the other hand, has been through a major facelift the past few years; from a drug-addict rank, it is now evolving into one of the city’s hottest art-spots, with independent theaters, small galleries and sophisticated bars popping up every other week.

Go next

Islands

  • Piraeus – the harbour of Athens, and Rafina (on the east coast of Attica) are the departure points for a large number of ferry services to the Greek Islands and other destinations in the eastern Mediterranean, including ports in Italy, Egypt, Turkey, Israel and Cyprus. Fast hydrofoil, catamaran or helicopter services also take you to the Greek Islands. Italy is easily approached by boat from Patras (take a train or a bus to Patras).
  • The port of Lavrion in southern Attica is being increasingly developed as a ferry port, especially for (some) Cyclades routes. Rafina and, especially, Piraeus remain the main hubs for the Cyclades and the Dodecanese.
  • The closest islands, suitable for a day trip from Piraeus, are in the Argosaronic (or Saronic) gulf: Hydra, Aegina, Poros, Spetses and Salamina. Kea (also pronounced Tzia) is a very nearby destination, too, less than two hours from the port of Lavrio. If what you are thinking is an island further away from Piraeus, like ParosNaxos, Ios, Santorini or any of the Dodecanese or Northern Aegean isles, you should probably consider with extra days off Athens because of their distance from the mainland. Flying is also an option to the more distant islands.

Nearby

  • Day trips to the Corinth Canal, the ancient theatre at Epidaurus and to the ancient sites of Olympia, Delphi and Mycenae are easy with a rental car. Other towns along the Peloponnese such as Nafplion are charming and worthwhile.
  • Vari-Voula-Vouliagmeni

North

  • Thessaloniki – tickets can be booked online in advance and the journey takes 5 hr. From here, you can travel onwards to North Macedonia and Bulgaria.

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Greece

Heraklion Crete Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

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Crete’s largest city and capital, Heraklion is an urban maze with little greenery and sometimes hectic traffic; however, hidden treasures are nestled among the concrete chaos of unregulated structured modern buildings.

Known from ancient times as Knossos’ port, the city had been under Arab and Venetian occupation in the Middle Ages, only to change conquerors in the 17th century, when Ottomans invaded its forts.

In recent history, Heraklion went under a major facelift before 2004, as it was one of Greece’s Olympic Cities. The historic center was pedestrianized and the waterfront was heavily reformed; today locals stroll or bike by the sea in crisp summer evenings.

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

Getting around

Most of the city’s places of interest are located within the historic center, where distances are more than walkable. Frequent public transport serves the most remote attractions.

Historic Center and Waterfront

Venetians entrenched Chandacas (former name of Heraklion) with massive city walls. The municipal area within the walls is today called the Historic Center of the city.

Within the Historic Center one will find the Archaeological Museum of Heraklion, which is the second greater Greek archaeological museum, after the one in Athens. Covering a time period from the Neolithic Era until the Roman Empire, it features important relics from the Minoan civilization, along with fascinating frescos from Knossos. Don’t miss Phaestos Disk, a circular disk with pictographic inscriptions that have not yet been decoded.

By the waterfront, sits the captivating Historical Museum of Crete. Founded by Andreas Kalokerinos, of the city’s most generous benefactors, it houses fascinating collections which deal with Crete’s more recent history and folk art. Two of El Greco’s original paintings are exhibited here. Other displays include artefacts and maps from Byzantine to Ottoman period. A photo-exhibition of the city’s suffering during The Battle of Crete is presented on the museum’s second floor, while the third floor hosts a collection of folklore art.

Not far away from the Historical Museum, you will find Koules Venetian Fortress. Built in the 16th century, it was primarily used to repel Turkish invaders, before it was turned into a prison for Cretan rebels. Nowadays the grounds of the Fortress are not normally open to the public; however, it is occasionally used for temporary exhibitions.

Loggia, which currently houses Heraklion’s city hall, is a fine example of Venetian architecture; built in the 17th century, its original purpose was to serve as an exclusive club for Venetian nobles. Right next to Loggia, stands the Church of Sent Titos. Initially built more than 1000 years ago, it had been destroyed and rebuilt twice, with the current structure dating back to 1856. During this time it served as a Catholic church and a mosque respectively, until 1925, when it was turned into an Orthodox church.

On the city’s main square, one will come across Morosini Fountain. Raised in early 17th century, it is also known as Lion Fountain, because of the four stone lions that decorate its upper part. Another lovely fountain stands at the end of 1866 Market Street; Babmo Fountain, or “Falte Jami” as locals call it, is adjoined to an old Turkish pump-house, which nowadays houses a traditional coffee house.

Outside the city

The Minoan Palace of Knossos is an absolute must-see for travelers in Heraklion. Considered to be Europe’s most ancient city, Knossos thrived during the Bronze Age; the palace has gone under extensive restoration and guided tours are available in the front gate. To get to the capital of the Minoan civilization, take city bus No. 2.

Marine-life enthusiasts are welcome to visit Cretaquarium. Located 15 kilometers east of the city of Heraklion, the aquarium mainly focuses on marine life of the Mediterranean Sea, boasting 2,500 marine creatures of 250 different species.

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Greece

Santorini Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

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Combining rich ancient history with significant natural beauty, Santorini is maybe the most visited of the Greek islands. Also known as Thira, it suffered a gigantic volcano eruption in prehistoric times, which is estimated to have contributed to the termination of the Minoan civilization. The eruption created a huge caldera, providing the island with dramatic cliff scenery.

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

Clear blue waters and volcanic-sand beaches, complemented with whitewashed Cycladean buildings and picturesque cobblestoned backstreets, make Santorini a popular destination for travellers of any age. Santorini’s remarkable beauty has also been noticed by local and international celebrities, who have purchased privet properties on different parts of the island.

The island features excellent tourist facilities, including hip boutique hotels and luxurious spas. Celebrated chefs cater some of the finest restaurants in the country, while trendy bars and chic clubs add to the lively nightlife.

Santorini (officially Thira) is a volcanic island in the Cyclades group of the Greek islands in the southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km southeast of mainland Greece. It is located between Ios and Anafi islands. Thira is essentially what remained after an enormous volcanic explosion that destroyed the earliest settlements on a formerly single island, and created the current geological caldera.

It is famous for dramatic views, stunning sunsets from Oia town, the strange white aubergine (eggplant), the town of Thira, an active volcano, and its beautiful beaches (e.g., Perissa—possibly the best beach in Thira, the black pebble beach of Kamari, white beach, and red beach).

Understand

An alternative name for Santorini is Thira. Santorini is also a name for the family of islands surrounding Thira, once forming a single island prior to a major volcanic event in approximately 1500 B.C.E.

The small island cradles a rich variety of landscapes and villages. Visit traditional architecture in the small village of Mesa Gonia containing a mixture of ruins from the 1956 earthquake and restored villas as well as a winery at the foot of the settlement. Pyrgos is another notable village set inland with its grand old houses, remains of a Venetian castle and several Byzantine churches.

The island has no natural source of fresh water. Prior to the early 1990s, it was necessary for water to be delivered to the island via tanker from Crete. However, most hotels and homes now have access to water provided by a local desalination plant. While this water is potable, it is still rather salty, so most everyone drinks bottled water while visiting Santorini.

Fira is the fiery capital, a marriage of Venetian and Cycladic architecture, whose white cobblestone streets bustle with shops, tavernas, hotels and cafes, while clinging to the rim of the caldera nine hundred feet above its port. If arriving by sea you can take a cable car up from the port or alternatively take a trip on one of the hundreds of mules up the 588 zigzagging steps. You could also attempt to walk up the steps but be warned, they are winding, narrow in parts with only low walls, they are covered in donkey excrement and the donkeys themselves will make no attempt to avoid you.

Walking along a path for about twenty minutes will bring you to Imerovigli where you can take in the magnificent views of the island’s unique scenery from the tiny town, as it is the highest point of the Caldera cliffs.

Just above Fira is the quintessentially Santorininian town of Ia, also sometimes spelled Oia, with its whitewashed walls sunk into the volcanic rock and its blue domes rising above the sterling beauty of the stunning, russet Ammoudi Bay. At dusk, the town attracts crowds of people venturing to see the sunset. Santorini’s sunsets, as viewed from Oia, are reputed to be among the world’s most beautiful.

Due to the spectacular and unique natural beauty of Santorini, many Greek singers have chosen the island as the setting of their videos. Greek and Brazilian TV series have been shot of Santorini, as well as some Hollywood movies (e.g. Tomb Raider II). Generally Santorini is a pole of attraction for Greek and international celebrities. World-famous Greek composer Yanni wrote a song inspired by the beauty of the island, the song, also named “Santorini” is definitely worth checking out, specially the version performed live at the Acropolis with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra.

Climate

The season starts April 1, or around Greek Easter. The period from December through March is very much the off-season and marked by colder temperatures, rain and winds. Although the temperature is rarely cold, the poor weather makes for a less than optimal experience on this beautiful island. Most of the businesses, including hotels and guest houses, may be closed. Ideal times to visit, for milder weather, prices and crowds, are April–June and September–October.

Get in

Getting in from Athens by air is faster and not prone to sea sickness, compared to ferries. However, in season air tickets sell out well before most of the ferries.

Cheap Flights to Santorini

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Bologna

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Bordeaux

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With regular flights from Athens by Olympic Air and Aegean Airlines. Flight duration from Athens to Santorini is about 30-45 minutes. During summer, Sky Express connects Santorini with other popular islands such as Crete (Heraklion), Rhodes and Mykonos. During the months of July and August Astra Airlines flies from Thessaloniki.

From the airport there are buses to Fira, where you can change to buses for other towns. Taxis are also usually waiting at the airport, but competition for them can be keen. Many Santorini hotels offer airport transfers, usually for a fee that’s more than a taxi would charge you, but some may find it worth it for the convenience. As the island is very small it’s possible to walk from the airport if you are fit enough (cca 5.5km/90min to the centre of Fira)

By sea

Take the ferry from Piraeus- port of Athens – past Paros and Naxos to the new port on Santorini. More details in the Cyclades article. There is also daily connection between Heraklion (Crete) and Santorini during high season.

If you prefer sea, your best bet is high-speed catamarans. The trip from Pireaus to Santorini takes 4.5hrs with a high speed ferry.

Ferries dock at the seaport of Athinios, where buses and taxis meet each arrival to transport passengers to Oia, Fira, and elsewhere. All vehicles climb a very steep, winding road (it makes seven 180 degree turns) to get anywhere from Athinios.

If you arrive by cruise ship, the experience will surely leave you with lasting memories. Cruise ships that reach the island do not anchor near Athinios port, but one or two miles north, also within the caldron, but below Thira (aka Fira). Locals with fishing boats occasionally transfer cruisers to the old port (which seems not to have changed over the last 50 years), and larger, decorated shuttle boats take large-ship cruisers to/from the nearby docks below Thira. From the “Thira docks”, you can use the cable car to reach the town, taking perhaps 5 minutes for the ride. Or if you like small adventures you can ride a donkey, which climbs up a small path on the cliff (weight limits imposed).

  • With one or more large cruise ships off-shore, long lines may queue at the bottom of the cable car. Casual Thira walkers/shoppers may meet many others at the top returning after a few hours, and other queues form somewhat before passengers are expected back aboard their ship(s). Plan accordingly.
  • The donkey ride will last longer, may have no queues, and is definitely a unique experience for those meeting the weight limits.
    • If weight proves a problem and you’re fit, ask if you might walk up along the donkey path (no charge, but no mean feat).

Transport by sea is always dependent on climate. For safety, especially in winter or raining monsoon, cruise ships may delay or cancel shuttles to/from shore, and ferries their departure times to or from the island.

Getting around

Frequent bus routes serve most places in Santorini. However, most buses stop operating around midnight. For more independence consider hiring a car, or scooter, from one of the island’s many car rental offices. Transportation to Fira includes a cable car, or the more traditional donkey rides.

The island has a public bus service, KTEL Santorini, with buses costing €1.80–2.50, depending on the route. During peak season, buses run up to every 15 minutes on the three highest-volume routes, which are the ones from Fira to Oia, Kamari, and Perissa. Other buses may run anywhere from twice an hour to only a few times per day.. The buses occasionally miss trips, and some drivers are less than friendly. Boats also run between major coastal towns on the island.

Cars can be rented from about € 45 a day. An international driving permit is recommended. Without one, many car rental places will rent cars, but travel guides have mentioned tourists having insurance problems in case of accident. Scooters and 4-wheelers (quads or all-terrain-vehicles) are available to rent starting at about €15 or €30 per day, respectively. A drivers license is required to rent these 4-wheelers. Be aware that most of the people in Santorini are tourists. As a result, road conditions are extremely unsafe, with many people driving by the laws and conventions of nearly every country in the world.

A popular method of getting around is to rent ATVs, though the “all-terrain” part is a misnomer, as most ATV riders are tourists riding on the paved road. ATVs share the road with other drivers and are usually all over the island. The island is small enough to travel around on an ATV, and is a cost-effective way to self-explore the further reaches of Santorini. ATV rental shops are all around the island, so it’s best to ask your hotel owner/concierge on the closest/most trusted vendor. You will need your local driver’s license to ride one of these, and a helmet is recommended.

Some hotels advise booking a taxi in advance, as there are not enough available taxis on the island during high season. As is the rule in the Cyclades, taxi fares are typically shared between multiple passengers, so don’t be surprised if your cabbie picks up more passengers during your trip.

It takes about 50 minutes to drive the island from end to end (from Vlichada to Ia).

By bicycle

The island is small enough that it can be thoroughly explored by bicycle, or with a few bus trips, by foot. Bicycle rentals are fairly hard to find—most places advertising bike rentals refer to motorbikes, rather than bicycles. The maps are designed for hikers, however, so the recommended routes are impassable by bicycle.

Santorini is not very bicycle-friendly—there are no dedicated bicycle routes, so you must share roads with vehicular traffic. In addition, the island is very hilly. The traffic was more friendly to bicycles than to pedestrians or other vehicular traffic, however.

By foot

Recommended routes by foot include the amazing walk from Fira to Oia (note that this walk is less nice in reverse, it can take less than three hours but can be difficult, for up and downhill climbs, the rocky surface at times, and the proximity to unprotected cliffs that drop sharply into the caldera) along the caldera, as well as the paths over Perissa Rock connecting Perissa, Kamari, and Pyrgos. The walk between Perissa and Kamari is fairly short (via Ancient Thira), while the walk to Pyrgos is somewhat longer, passing through the highest point on the island.

Popular areas of Santorini

Villages

There are several villages on Santorini Island.

  • Fira – the main stunning cliff-perched town, featuring all that Oia has, but much more overcrowded.
  • Kamari – black pebble beach.
  • Oia or Ia – for unforgettable sunsets, probably the most charming place on the island.
  • Pyrgos – highest point on the island; picturesque monastery and streets, can compete with Oia.
  • Perissa – Nice, well-organized beaches and good Greek fish taverns.
  • Megalochori -Traditional village with a lot of old white cycladic churches.
  • Akrotiri -Visit the archeological site of Akrotiri.
  • Monolithos – Nice beach and a few good taverns. Very good for children, as the water is shallow.
  • Vlichada – a small village and a beach.
  • Vothonas – a small rock village, the church of St. Ann is here. Architecturally it is the strangest village on the island, as all the buildings were cut from the ravine that it is in.

Also there’s Thirasia, a village on the nearby island with the same name—visited by fewer tourists. There are daily excurisions to the Kameni (volcano) Island which also reach Thirasia island.

Build by the caldera’s edge, Fira is Santorini’s main village. Charming whitewashed houses and countless hotels enjoy privileged views of the Aegean Sea. Fira’s scenic backstreets are filled with hip boutiques, souvenir shops, busy restaurants, cocktail bars and cosy cafes.

North from Fira, sits the village of Oia, where flocks of tourists crowd its narrow cliff-side alleys to enjoy its famous sunset. Targeting to more upscale travellers, Oia features some of the best hotels and finest restaurants on the island.

An excursion to the nearby volcanic isles is a popular activity in Santorini.  Thirasia, the largest among the isles, was cut off the main island in 236 BC due to another volcano eruption. Manolas, the isle’s main parish, is a typical laid-back Cycladic village. Old Kameni and New Kameni are still volcanically active and therefore not populated. However, visitors come to Old Kameni to enjoy its hot springs. New Kameni is the most recently created piece of land in the Mediterranean Sea, while both Old and New Kameni are included in Natura 2000 Protected Areas.

Ancient sites of Santorini

Ancient Acrotiri is a prehistoric city which dates back to 16th century BC. Archaeologists count it as a Minoan colony and have come to believe that it had been evacuated before the big volcano eruption. Most the site’s fascinating findings are now exhibited in the Museum of Prehistoric Thira in Fira. The museum’s collections include outstanding frescos, ceramics and an impressive golden figurine featuring a wild goat. One ticket covers the entrance to both the archeological site and the museum.

Santorini’s other ancient site, Ancient Thira, consists of a combination of Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine remains. Quite large, it includes a theatre, agora, some temples and a few ancient residences with interesting floor mosaics.

The best beaches of Santorini

Accessible by car or boat, Santorini’s Red Beach is surrounded by red and dark volcanic cliffs. Featuring red sand, it is popular with both locals and tourists; therefore it can be quite crowded in August. For a less hectic choice, try the nearby White Beach, a smaller and quieter cove paved with white pebble.

Surrounded by lunar rocky landscape, Vlichada Beach offers soft black sand and dozens of minor caves to explore. Nudism is acceptable one the side of the beach, once you pass Theros Wave Bar. Perivolos Beach, on the south-eastern side of the island, stretches for about 7 kilometers, boasting crystal clear waters and numerous beach bars and restaurants.

Santorini is one of the great natural wonders of the world, and its main attraction is the landscape and seascape of the island itself. The configuration of the present, roughly semicircular island is the result of an enormous volcanic explosion which occurred probably around 1630 bce, literally blowing the top off the island and changing what had been a typical half-submerged mountain of an Aegean island into a flooded crescent caldera, in the middle of which a few small smoking islands still bear witness to volcanic activity. Some have speculated that this event was the inspiration for the myth of Atlantis. The towns of Fira, Ia (also known as Oia) and Thirasis cling to the steep cliffs facing into the caldera bay. Tours to the central “smoking” islands are readily available and one can see and feel steam vents and recent (1950s) lava flows.

Another popular reason for coming to Santorini are the legendary sunsets, some of the most spectacular in the world. Ia is one of the few places on the island which is both close to a sea and offers a good view to a sunset over the sea: in other towns, the sun disappears behind the volcano.

Additionally the town of Fira is stunning.

Be sure to explore the areas outside of the towns. There is beautiful countryside where tradition still survives. Cave houses (both abandoned and occupied), gardens, vineyards, small family business, and tiny churches are there to be discovered.

Santorini ranks among top destinations for wedding celebrations for at least 4 years—primarily for sunset and peace, like those in Oia. Couples often arrive with few friends, stay in Ia (places like Fanari Villas). Groups often arrive in the beginning of the week—judging by demand for cabrios and number of corteges seen on Mondays compared to weekends.

While the island is full of medium- and top-cost hotels and villas, there are still lots of abandoned caves and modest private houses where no one seems to live for a long time—even in western Oia where every inch seems to be occupied by some villa.

  • Thirassia: small island near Santorini; place with more authentic villages, buildings and even churches. Take a look at hymnasia: in the yard, pupil painted children on the walls.
  • Boat excursions: volcano island (Nea Kameni) – hot springs (Palia Kameni) – Thirassia
From Ia: departure from Ammoudi bay at 10:50AM (starting and end point); a bit later from Armeni bay. 1hr 30min at volcano island; 45min for hot springs; 2hrs for Thirassia (incl. time for lunch). Meals are not included, normally the guide advises you to visit Captain Jack’s tavern, which is self service if you arrive with a big group or operates with waiters if you don’t. This restaurant serves amazing fresh seafood at the cheapest prices. Testament to how good it is, is the fact you will notice that none of the adjacent restaurants are ever busy. Only this one.

Eat

Santorini specials include: the white aubergine (eggplant); fava caper ; a variety of tomato keftedes, with whole slices of tomatoes fried in batter; dolmades, stuffed vine leaves. Another must-try is fresh fish grilled in tavernas, esp. those close to a sea.

If you decide to eat or drink in a taverna overlooking the caldera or having a good view to a sunset, expect higher prices than a similar establishment in one of the many side-streets as you are charged extra for the view –- but what a view!

For those who enjoy the Mediterranean diet—fresh fish, vegetables, and meat dishes can be found at several moderately priced restaurants (average 40 Euros for two) in Imerovigli, Oia, and Fira. To save money, stay away from places that are overtly commercial and go to the family run fish taverns located nearby the smaller beaches and communities.

Gyros places are everywhere.

Don’t miss the traditional fried tomato balls of tomato keftedes and be sure to ask for local tomatoes in your salad. They may be the best tasting you have ever had. Santorini is particularly well known for its cherry tomatoes which are very sweet.

Drink

Wineries

Tour local wineries and enjoy the local wines, well thought of, if not world famous. A combination of climatic factors and the tastes of those who have occupied and lived on the island have formed an eclectic cuisine.

Where to stay in Santorini

Santorini island could be divided into two parts, the western side and the eastern. Santorini mainly owes its popularity to the western side. This is where the caldera is, and the villages, like Fira and Oia, that are built on the cliff. On this side most hotels have terrific views of the caldera, volcano, the sea and sunsets. There is of course a drawback that you have to keep in mind before making your reservation: majority of the hotels built on the caldera have many stairs, which is usually annoying for tourists not willing to climb up and down all the time. Some of the hotels do not accept children under 13, because they do not offer any children’s facilities, due to their dangerous location on the cliff. There are hotels that are specially oriented to couples and honeymooners. Most of Santorini luxury resorts can be found on the western side of the island. Note that not all hotels which are on the western side of the island offer views, as some of them are in town.

The eastern side of Santorini resembles the rest of the Greek islands in the Cyclades. There are many beach hotels, especially in Kamari, that also attract a lot of tourists, mainly youngsters and families. These hotels usually offer larger rooms and pools than those on the other side of the island.

Keep in mind that the room rates are often set according to the view of the room, which makes the hotels on eastern side much cheaper than those on the western side.

Moreover keep in mind that booking your accommodation in advance would be very helpful, as most hotels have few rooms (usually not more than 20) and quickly fill.

Most of the island’s hotels are closed during winter. They open during or after Greek Orthodox Easter (April or May) and usually close by the end of October. As in other Greek Islands, July, August and September are considered high season.

Stay safe in Santorini

Be aware of rental scams, especially with agencies working only with motorbikes and ATVs. Using these types of vehicles is very common on Santorini and there are a lot of rental agencies. Some of them are ready to cheat. They will offer faulty motorbikes or ATVs for a lower price, but in case of accident they will demand that the customer pay for the whole cost of damage. They are offering only basic insurance but will present it like full insurance. Also, there is a big possibility of serious injuries.

It is possible to recognize these rental agencies by observing them aggressively attracting tourists and offering lower prices than others. Employees in front of these type of agencies will be loud and ready to promise everything until the contract is signed. It is necessary to check the vehicle before making any decision. Their vehicles are in most of the cases dusty, dirty and look old.

Santoríni is relatively crime free: you are quite unlikely to be pickpocketed. On the other hand you may feel you have been ripped off by some restaurant or bar bills. In particular:

  • Bring sunscreen. A bottle of SPF30 sunscreen will run about 20 Euro, with higher SPF sunscreen costing appropriately more.
  • While this is obvious, remember not to shop at stores or order at restaurants without posted prices.

Physically the cliffs and low walls guarding large drops pose a danger to children while the elderly may encounter problems with the many steps. Cave exploring can be fun too but it is not recommended to deviate from the paths because of the unstable rocks made of tufa.

Telecommunications in Santorini

There are some local radio stations in Santorini, mainly in Greek language. When in Santorini, turn your radio at: Volcano Radio at 106.4 MHz and Top Melody Fm Radio at 104.9 MHz.

Internet Cafe’s in Santorini

You can find internet cafes in Kamari, Perissa, Thira (wireless access also available) and in Oia.

Go next

Ferries are available to Anafi, Chalki, Folegandros, Heraklion (Crete), Ios, Karpathos, Kasos, Katapola, Kos, Koufonissi, Milos, Mykonos, NaxosParosPiraeus, Rafina, Rhodes, Serifos, Sifnos, Sikinos, Sitia, Syros, Thirasia, and Tinos.

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Greece

Thessaloniki Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

Thessaloniki1000x600

Greece’s second city, Thessaloniki features most of the capital’s advantages, such as a wide market and vast choices in cultural events. It lacks of Athens’ hassles, including the hectic lifestyle, with Thessalonians being known for dealing with any dilemma over a long “frappe” (Greek iced coffee). A major college city, it offers lively nightlife, along with a variety of inexpensive dining and entertainment options. Salonica, bears a great history, shards of which pop out every other corner during a long stroll.

Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
1,902
Deaths
87
Deaths (24h)
2.0%
Deaths (%)
23,074
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
23.7%
Recovered (%)
72,312
Active
74.3%
Active (%)

Thessaloniki (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη, Turkish: Selanik, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian: СолунSolun) is the capital of the region of Central Macedonia, Greece, and is, at about one million inhabitants, the second largest city in the country. More importantly, it is a city with a continuous 3,000-year history, preserving relics of its Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman past and of its formerly dominant Jewish population. Its Byzantine churches, in particular, are included in UNESCO’s World Heritage list.

Thessaloniki lies on the northern fringe of the Thermaic Gulf on its eastern coast and is bound by Mount Chortiatis on its southeast. The metropolitan area, with population of about 1 million, can be divided roughly in 3 parts: The northwestern, the central and the southeastern.

The central part, corresponding to the region that used to be inside the Byzantine walls and can in turn be divided in the “Ano Poli” (Upper City) region which lies on the hillside that is actually the southwest end of Chortiatis, and the part of the city located between the Upper City and the sea.

The later is the “center” of Thessaloniki, as most commercial, entertainment and educational facilities can be found here, while this part of the city remains a dense populated residential area. It is the area surrounded by the seafront to the southwest, Olibiados street to the northeast, Dimokratias square to the northwest and the University campus and the facilities of Thessaloniki International Fair to the southeast. Most places with tourist interest are either in the center or very close to it.

Most roads in the center are either parallel or perpendicular to the coastline. A simple rule that helps the visitor is that if the a street goes downhill, then following it will lead you to the sea. The biggest parallel streets to the sea starting from the sea are Leoforos Nikis, Tsimiski Ioanni, Egnatia, Agiou Dimitriou and Kassandrou. The main vertical to the sea streets, starting from northwest, are Dragoumi Ionos, Venizelou Eleftheriou, Aristotelous, Agias Sofias and Ethinikis Aminis.

Tourist Information

There are tourist info and ticket booths at the central bus stations. You can get a free bus line chart there. The tourist information office is at Tsimiski 136, a few minutes from the White Tower. It is open Monday to Friday 8AM-8PM, Sa 09:30-16:00 at winter and 08:00-20:00 at summer, Sun closed. If you find it closed, walk up to Aristotelous and buy a map from Iannos bookshop.

Get in

By train

Caution Note: The international train D335 between Belgrade and Thessaloniki have been intermittently cancelled, sometimes – but not always – replaced by bus, due to major track works on the Serbian side. This is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. On a more positive note, this will result in faster travel times when track works are finished.

The Greek Railway Company is called OSE (ΟΣΕ). The trains are operated under the name TrainOSE. There are daily regional trains to Veroia-Edessa and Katerini-Larissa, three trains to Florina, six InterCity (IC) trains and one night-train to Athens via Platy-Katerini-Larissa-Palaiofarsalos-Domokos-Leianokladi-Leivadia-Thiva-Oinoi-SKA-Athens (approx 5h20min), two trains to Kilkis-Serres-Drama-Xanthi-Komotini-Alexandroupoli and one train to Karditsa-Trikala-Kalampaka.

There is a once-daily train service to/from Belgrade and Sofia.

There are normally employees at all major stations to facilitate transportation of disabled persons.

Discounts

Ask for these discounts even if the TRAINOSE employee does not mention them:

  • Children (ages 4-12) get a 50% discount.
  • Youth under 26 and elderly over 65 get a 25% discount (not on ICE).
  • Disabled people and their escort get a 50% discount.
  • Groups get a 30%-50% discount.
  • Two-way trips also get a discount.

By bus

Thessaloniki is connected via the intercity KTEL bus network with every corner of Greece.

Prominent long-distance bus connections

  • Athens/Volos – KTEL Buses from/to Athens and Volos make the trip from/to Thessaloniki in about 6 hr 30 min and 2 hr 30 min, respectively, the former including a 20 min stop at a roadside restaurant, usually near Lamia, with toilet facilities. Buses are air-conditioned, and some offer WiFi internet access.
  • Belgrade – There are a number of weekly departures to Belgrade (Serbia) from Thessaloniki and Athens, in the arrangement of the Greek and Serbian Agency. Ticket price in one direction from Thessaloniki to Belgrade is about €45
  • Tirana – There are a number of buses to Thessaloniki and Athens every day, departing from most major Albanian cities. You can catch a bus from Tirana or Shkodra and travel all the way south, making stops in most major Albanian and Greek cities. Since buses stop to pick up and drop passengers in most major cities, you can catch the bus at those cities en route.
  • Skopje – A number of local travel agencies in Skopje also arrange transport to Thessaloniki daily by car or minibus. These generally leave around 05:00, and cost around €25 for a day return (returning at 17:00) or a single (i.e. €50 if you want to come back on a different day from when you leave) The travel agent at the back of the shopping mall by the Central Square arranges this departing from beside the Holiday Inn. Others depart from the bus station, or other locations around the city. Simeonidis tours, N⁰ 14, 26th October St. There is one bus daily departing for Thessaloniki from the central bus station in Skopje and it takes about 5 hr to Thessaloniki. It departs at 06:00. Reservations are recommended.
  • Sofia – There are at least four daily buses from Sofia, Bulgaria which pass through Thessaloniki, plus several non-daily. Prices are generally around 50BGN (€25). See here for more info.

The domestic flight network is quite extensive, with most flights provided by either Aegean Airlines, its regional subsidiary Olympic Air, or Astra Airlines, an operator of subsidized public-service-obligation flights to less frequently served destinations. Domestic connections are also partially seasonal, and encompass a range of Greek Islands.

Apart from those, the majority of flights are charter and seasonal flights by holiday specialists. There is also substantial low-fare traffic by pretty much all major low-fare carriers in Europe, with Ryanair having a base at the airport and the largest number of connections out of those. When it comes to traditional international airlines, the airport is mainly served by those belonging to the Star Alliance, which also includes Aegean and Olympic, such as Austrian, Turkish and Swiss.

The airport is not as well served as the Athens airport, to which it is connected by multiple daily flights taking around 50 minutes, provided by multiple airlines. Aegean’s frequent shuttle flights are of particular interest, as they can be booked on a common ticket with an Aegean or other Star Alliance flight to other destinations in Europe and beyond.

If you are departing from SKG on an international flight taking you out of the Schengen zone, bear in mind that there are only four passport control booths (with one dedicated solely to EU citizens), so the queues to access the extra-Schengen gates (12 through 19) even when they are all operating can exceed 40 minutes at peak times, and it’s 40 minutes of shoving and aggravation. one you are through passport control, facilities are limited, so if you plan to eat, fill a drinking water bottle, or use toilets without queuing, do this before passport control.

A taxi ride may be a quicker, but much more expensive way to get to the city than the bus

Connection to the city centre

The airport is 15 km south of the city centre. The public transit connection is provided by bus line X1, a 24×7 service between the airport, the New Railway Station and the Macedonia InterCity Bus Terminal. Frequency is between 15 min and 30 min during the day. At night, the bus number changes to N1 and runs every 30 minutes. A ticket costs €2 for one trip (see Get around: By bus). Tickets can be bought at a vending booth at the airport bus stop or at ticket machines on the buses. However, for these exact change is needed. The ride from the airport to the city centre takes around 40 minutes. Buses can get very packed so do not expect a very comfortable ride.

Attention: Bus number 79 from the airport does not get you to the city centre but to A.S. IKEA bus terminal in the city’s east side.

A taxi ride from the city centre costs about €15-20. It’s hard to find one during peak hours (07:00-08:00, 14:00-16:00 and 19:00-21:00), so plan early.

Luggage storage

A luggage storage room is available on the arrival floor. As of 2016, fees start from €3 (storing a small bag for 6 hours).

A hiking trail

If you’d like some exercise before, after or between your flights, you can spend this time on a fairly pleasant river- and sea-side trail. It starts about 600 m from the terminal, where the airport’s main access road crosses a small river (40°31’40.8″N 22°59’04.3″E). From there, a trail follows the river’s right (NE) bank toward the north-west for about 1 km, until the river enters the sea; watch for water birds. From the river’s mouth, the trail follows the sea coast to the NE and N for about 1 km, until it reaches the mouth of another little river. While not an official beach, swimming in the sea is possible. From that point, one can continue east for about 500 m along a small residential street named Floridas, until reaching the main highway (Leoforos Georgikis Scholis) just south of the Lidl store (40°32’44.6″N 22°59’05.2″E). From there, two shopping centers, Hondos and IKEA (both with air conditioning, soft chairs, food, and free WiFi) are within walking distance. From the IKEA bus terminal (40°32’53.3″N 22°59’02.6″E) you can take one of the bus lines to the city center (e.g. bus number 2) paying the standard one journey ticket price which is cheaper than taking the bus 78/78N directly from the airport (see Get around: By bus). The trail takes about an hour one-way and of course can be done in the other direction if you are arriving from the city center at the IKEA bus terminal and have some time to kill before your flight.

By car

  • Athens about 5 hr (Highway A1, E75)
  • Belgrade in Serbia about 7 hr (A1, E75)
  • Istanbul in Turkey about 8 hr (A2, E90)
  • Tirana in Northeastern Albania about 6 hr (Α29 and Α2)
  • Sofia in Northwest Bulgaria about 4 hr (Α25, Ε79)
  • Constanta in Romania about 8 hr.

One of the burdens for visitors and inhabitants alike is finding parking, so be prepared to either spend a lot of time looking for a place or pay for space in the parking lot (starting from €4 for 3 hr). Don’t assume you’re safe from paying a fine just because locals flagrantly flout parking laws. Traffic congestion is a problem, largely due to double-parked cars, but generally fellow drivers and passers-by are helpful in showing you the way if you’re lost.

Getting around

The Thessalonian metro system is under construction and estimated to open in 2016. However, a comprehensive bus network serves the city quite efficiently. Additionally, several points of interest are within walking distance from one another.

By bus

The city’s bus company is called OASTH and runs a total of 80 different bus lines, which are the only public transportation within the city. Maps of the bus routes are available on OASTH’s website [1]. Bus services usually operate from 05:00 until just after midnight.

Bus number 50 (“cultural line”) follows a figure-of-8 route past all the major tourist sights. There is an English speaking guide aboard, who provides you with maps and information. The whole route takes 50 min, and it departs every hour on the hour from the White Tower. The connection to the airport is provided by bus 78, which runs as 78N in the night (the only night bus line in the city).

This being Greece, the bus drivers go on strike occasionally (as it happened in August 2016). Notices about strikes may appear (in Greek only, naturally) at the bus stops information panels.

Tickets

Tickets can be bought at OASTH’s ticket outlets and on the buses. Certain types of tickets (see below) are also available at various other sales points. There are five types of tickets available:

  • One journey ticket: €1.00 from OASTH’s ticket outlets or other selling points, €1.10 on the bus; valid for one journey on all lines except 50, 78 and 78N.
  • Two journey ticket: €1.20 from OASTH’s ticket outlets or other selling points, €1.30 on the bus; valid for two journeys on all lines except 50, 78 and 78N, the second journey starting within 70 minutes of the first.
  • Three journey ticket: €1.50 from OASTH’s ticket outlets or on the bus; valid for three journeys on all lines except 50, 78 and 78N, the third journey starting within 90 minutes of the first.
  • Four journey ticket: €2.00 from OASTH’s ticket outlets or on the bus; valid for four journeys on all lines except 50, 78 and 78N, the fourth journey starting within 120 minutes of the first.
  • Airport line (78/78N) / Cultural line (50) ticket: €2.00 from OASTH’s ticket outlets or on the bus; valid only on lines 50, 78 and 78N.

Students, persons aged over 65, and persons with over 67% disability get a 50% discount if they have the documents required by OASTH to prove it. Accompanied children under the age of six ride for free.

1, 3, 6 and 12-month cards for unlimited journeys on all lines (including the Airport line 78/78N and the Cultural line 50) are also available. Note that they are valid from the first day of the month the where issued until the last day of the month / third month / sixth month / year. A photo-ID and a recent photograph are required to issue such cards. An one-month card costs €30.

By bicycle

Bicycle lanes often do not exist, even on main roads. Sometimes, there are bicycle lanes on the pavement. You should always be very careful.

ThessBike is a bike sharing system with stations mainly near the center of the town. More stations located in other areas are being planned. You can either become a subscriber or pay per hour. In general, expect to pay €1 per hour.

Historic Center

The White Tower is Thessaloniki’s most well-recognized landmark. Standing near the waterfront, it is no longer white; its name dates back to the early 20th century when it was whitewashed to wash out its bloody past. A massive massacre had taken place in the tower in 1826, during the domination of Ottoman Sultan Mahmud. Nowadays a small museum and a café are housed inside its grounds.

The Roman remains of Galerius Rotunda, Galerius Palace and the Arch of Galerius sit by the two sides of Egnatia Avenue. Little is left from the Roman Emperor’s palace, but the Rotunda, which was initially constructed to be his mausoleum, is quite well-preserved. The large circle structure was never used as a tomb after all; however, it served as the city’s first Christian church, as well as a mosque during Ottoman era. Today the square beside the Rotunda becomes lively in the evenings, as it is a meeting spot for Thessalonian youth.

The nearby Arch of Galerius was erected at the beginning of 3rd century to celebrate the emperor’s triumph over the Persians. Not far from Galerius’ structures, you will come across the ruins of the Roman Forum, where you can admire some of the interesting floor mosaics.

Thessaloniki’s Archaeological Museum is a must-see for any visitor. If you are on a strict schedule, go straight for the “Gold of Macedon” exhibit. Fascinating jewellery and other artefacts retrieved from royal tombs, from the period between 6th and 2nd century BC, are on display here. The rest of the museum houses collections which cover prehistoric times to Hellenistic period.

The northernmost Byzantine walls of the city and parts of the western walls are still standing, as is the city’s symbol – the White Tower. The rest of the walls are in the picturesque Upper Town which offers a spectacular view over the bay, especially in the late afternoon.

The city is also known as “the mother of Israel”, due to the once flourishing Jewish community here, which existed from the Roman period and grew substantially after the Ottoman Empire took in Jewish refugees expelled Spain, Portugal, and Spanish territories in Italy; these Jews are known as “Sephardim”. Sephardi Jews formed a significant percentage of the city’s population and infrastructure until World War II, when, in spring 1943, almost all were deported by the Nazis to the extermination camp at Auschwitz, never to return. However, there are still two Synagogues, and you can see the Jewish Museum.

Also interesting are the Turkish public baths Bey Hamam, the Bezesteni (Ottoman closed market for jewellery and precious materials) the Alatza Imaret (Ottoman poorhouse) and Hamza Bey Camii (both restored and used for exhibitions).

Ano Poli (Upper Town) and Acropolis

Acropolis, also known as Eptapyrgio, or Yedi Koule, refers to the upper part of the city which includes a Venetian castle with seven towers. Currently serving as a cultural center, the castle used to house the city’s prison from the 18th century until 1988. The municipal area between the Acropolis and Aggiou Dimitriou Street, Ano Poli, features scenic narrow backstreets, charming houses of the early 20th century and lovely backyards.

Three ancient churches, which are included in Unesco’s World Heritage List, are located here. Church of Nikolaos Orfanos dates back to the 4th century, boasting some fascinating frescos. The relics of Saint Dimitrios are hidden in an underground crypt of a church of the 5th century, which took after his name. Church of Osios David was used for the secret baptism of Galerius’ daughter. Dating back to the 5th century, the church still features well-preserved mosaics and some posterior frescos.

Within the area of the Turkish Consulate one will find the house of Kemal Ataturk. Born in Thessaloniki, the Turkish progressive leader lived his early childhood in the city before he left for Istanbul. The house he was born in has now been transformed into Kemal Ataturk’s Museum, bearing the original furnishing of his family.

Telecommunications in Thessaloniki

There are many Internet cafes and bars, restaurants or coffee shops that offer free wireless internet (wi-fi).

There are also free Wi-Fi hotspots in several public places: Thessaloniki International Fair, in the park outside the White Tower, and on Aristotelous Square.

At Thessaloniki airport, go up to the restaurant on the 2nd floor for free, fast (16 Mbps) wifi (SSID “Goodbye Free Wifi”). The IKEA store (4 km north of the airport) has free WiFi as well.

Stay safe in Thessaloniki

Watch your pockets and travel documents as there are pickpockets, especially in buses during rush hour.

Some people may feel very uncomfortable walking in the areas near the railway station at night, as there are several brothels there.

Police number: 100

Stay healthy in Thessaloniki

Tap water is safe to drink. In some places in the city centre you might get a slight “taste” from the water. That means that the pipes in the building are getting old, so you might want to buy bottled water.

Greece is a sunny place, and if your skin is light-coloured, intense sunlight can be a serious danger. Use sunscreen, a hat and sunglasses.

Emergency phone number: 112

Go next

The suburb of Panorama is well heeled and has good restaurants, and spectacular views over Thessaloniki – especially at sunset.

The classic trips out of Thessaloniki are:

  • Serres: The second largest city in Greece’s Macedonia region and close to the Bulgarian towns of Melnik and Bansko and Pirin National Park
  • Kavala and Philippi: About 160km east of Thessaloniki is Kavala, one of the most beautiful cities of Greece and is especially recommended to visit. The ancient site of Philippi is particularly known by Apostle Paul and the first Christian baptism in Europe
  • The Island Thasos is a green island with high mountains and wonderful beaches. You can visit the island on a day trip but its definitively worth to spent more days. There are ferry boats from Kavala harbor and Keramoti.
  • There are 500 km of wonderful beaches on the two first fingers of Halkidikí peninsula, one of the main tourism destinations of Greece. The first “finger” from the West is called Kassandra and its the place where many Salonicans (and tourists) spend their holidays. The second “finger” called Sithonia is the most beautiful place of Halkidiki both in landscape and beaches. In the summer, the Armenistis campground (Sithonia peninsula) stages concerts and other events. Also check out the jazz and classical concerts in Sani (Kassandra peninsula). Try to schedule your visit in summer so that you’re not driving back to the city on Sunday evening. The third finger is the monastic community of Mount Athos. Mount Athos is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This peninsula houses over 1,700 monks in 20 Eastern Orthodox monasteries. The visit is strictly controlled and only male visitors are allowed. Tourist require a visa. But there are also sightseeing boats that offer tours around the peninsula (without landing). These do not require permits and are the only option for women who want to see Mount Athos. The boat tours start in Ouranopolis from about 10 o’clock.
  • Mount Olympus coast, towards Platamonas, a very scenic region which has fallen out of favour with the trendy set but has lost no business – it is now mainly catering to tourists from Eastern Europe.
  • Pella, the Macedonian capital during the time of Alexander the Great.
  • Vergina, the spectacular site of the Macedonian royal tombs.
  • Dion, a beautiful archeological site near Mount Olympus.
  • Prespa and Doirani lakes near the borders with Albania and North Macedonia, respectively, the Prespas especially offering an austere and evocative Balkan landscape and plenty of birdwatching.

Fly to Thessaloniki

Cheap Flights to Thessaloniki

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Hotels in Thessaloniki

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Covid-19 Alerts Greece

Covid-19 Greece
97,288
Confirmed
2,151
Confirmed (24h)
87
Deaths (24h)
0
Recovered (24h)

According to the Government in Greece, Greece has confirmed 2,151 new Covid-19 infections within Greece in the last 24 hours and furthermore 87 deaths have been reported throughout Greece. With the new deaths of 87, Greece now has a total of 97,288 Coronavirus/Covid-19 infections and the official death rate reported by the government of Greece is 2.0%. 1,902 died in Greece.

Covid-19 Greece

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Corfu5 months ago

Explore the Towns and Villages of Corfu Island

Corfu Town – known in modern Greek as Kerkira or Kerkyra, is the largest and most important town on the island. This is where...

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