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Greece

Corfu Coronavirus Cases – Corfu Covid-19 Cases Update

Wolfgang Holzem

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Set in Adriatic Sea, Corfu, or Kerkira as the Greeks call it, was picked by Homer to be Odysseus’s semi-final stop, before he managed to reach home after 20 years of wandering. Part of the Byzantine Empire, it later thrived under the rule of Venetians and French, while the rest of Greece was under Ottoman occupation. During that time Corfu became an important artistic and educational hub, inheriting numerous architectural gems, which still stand on the islands streets and squares.

Greece
186,469
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
6,410
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.4%
Deaths (%)
165,095
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
88.5%
Recovered (%)
14,964
Active
8.0%
Active (%)

Browse down for full details of the current Coronavirus situation in Greece

Blessed with green hills and white-sand beaches, Corfu features a picturesque historic center and enchanted medieval fortresses. If you find yourself on the island during orthodox Easter, stroll around its kadounia (narrow streets) on Holy Saturday midnight; due to an old custom, Corfiots throw clay pitchers off their balconies, along with chocolate for visitors and children.

Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα, Kerkyra) is the northernmost of the Ionian Islands in Greece. Located off of the far northwest coast of the country, Corfu lies in the Adriatic sea, east of Italy and southwest of Albania. Historically Corfu has been controlled by many foreign powers, notably the Venetians, and British.

Regions

Corfu is 62 km long and at its widest point, nearly 30 km wide. The island is formed by two mountain ranges. The northern runs from the west to east and consists of limestones, reached in the Mount Pantokrator (914 meters) the maximum height of the island, while the southern mountain range is less high and streches from north to south. The North of the island is wider and more mountainous. The coastal areas are well developed with good pebbly beaches. However, the northeast coast has always remained a favorite, aka Kensington on sea. It is also where the island’s oldest village ‘Old Perithia’ is located just beneath Mt. Pantokrator, a Heritage Protected Site in a designated Area of Natural Beauty. The South of the island is less wide (only a few miles across from west to east) and tends to have sandier beaches.

Towns and villages

Image of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideImage of Destination GuideTowns

  • Corfu Town – known in modern Greek as Kerkira or Kerkyra, is the largest and most important town on the island. This is where the airport is located and where most cruise ships and long distance ferries dock. It is a small, pleasant city catering well to tourists. Its old town is listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Villages

  • Arillas – A beach resort that still feels like a village. Arillas has a long and wide sandy beach at the northwest corner of Corfu. Beautiful nature, clear waters and a beach offering much privacy. Many naturists have been coming to Arillas for decades because of this, so if you wander off to the left or right side of the beach, be prepared to encounter naked people! Arillas is also developing fast as one of the biggest spiritual spots of the world. There are three spiritual centers offering different courses on meditation, chanting, dancing, creative arts and also many people practicing all kinds of massage. Ideal to relax body, mind and spirit. The village is also famous for its festivals. The first is held on Ascension day (40 days after Easter, 13 June for 2020), another is held in the first weekend of August and the Wine festival is held on the first weekend of September. Many hundreds of people come to Arillas from all Northern Corfu to enjoy traditional dancing, great souvlakia, local wine, and the famous, fresh Corfu Beer which is produced in the village.
  • Benitses  – a very old, traditional fishing village. Benitses lies 12 km south of Corfu Town, and leads to the emerald valley. The water of the springs which flow from the mountains of Aghii Deka and Stavros, join together in two small rivers, giving the area the name Pinisse (derived from the ancient Greek word ‘Pinio’) = Pinitse = Benitses. The mild climate and the natural beauty of Benitses village has attracted a lot of tourists from the beginning of the century. It is only during the last 30 years that tourism has replaced all other sources of income and now is the sole occupation of the inhabitants during the summer season. The coastal road of Benitses is full of hotels, restaurants, cafes and other shops that offering everything the most demanding visitor can ask. Benitses is surrounded by the mountains in one side and the aquamarine waters of the Ionian Sea in the other, this unique combination of nature with the hospitality of the residents, which are very familiar with different cultures, are what make visitors to love the place. 3km to the north there is the famous Achilleion palace.
  • Kalami  – the village is where the British novelist Lawrence Durrell and his wife Nancy Isobel Myers chose to live from 1935 until the Greek surrender in April 1941
  • Kassiopi  – One of the more relaxed and atmospheric resorts with a pretty bay and beach that is mostly stony. The waters are crystal clear and calm. Somewhat spoilt by the prevalence of tacky tourist bars and cafes catering to the many English tourists that crowd the town.
  • Kavos – a seaside village on the island of Corfu in Greece, in the municipal district and the municipality of Lefkimmi. It is now a lively resort heavily devoted to tourism, and popular with young holidaymakers from Britain and Northern Europe.
  • Kynopiastes  – a traditional village of the Messi Region of Corfu and only 10 km away from Corfu town and airport, which is a must visit. Old mansions of the 17th to 19th centuries, a marble church, a 17th-century monastery and a museum (and the only one on the island) devoted to the olive tree with one of the world famous restaurants on the island tavern «Trypas», which has hosted Kings ike the Kings of Greece and England, Presidents of Countries like Konstantinos Karamanlis (Greece) and François Mitterrand (France), stars of the European and American cinema and music, like Jane Fonda, and Anthony Quinn. The narrow tiled paths invite you to walk on them, looking at the small squares and at the houses which preserve the traditional colors. The main church is devoted to the Virgin Mary and it is in the central square. It is a traditional church with unique architecture and an impressive marble entrance. Inside, there are frescoes of the 18th century Ionian School of Painting. At the edge of the village there is the monastery of Agia Paraskevi, built in the 17th century.
  • Lakones – a typical Corfiot village on the slope of a green hill. You should go for a walk to Bella Vista to admire the view over the bay of Paleokastritsa and relax in one of the picturesque coffee shops. If you like trekking there is a path leading down to Paleokastritsa. The surnames of the inhabitants of the region refer to the soldiers who supported Angelokastro in the late Byzantine period, as well as to refugees from Mani. Among the houses of the 18th and 19th centuries you will find churches and traditional coffee shops. At the central church you will see donations of the first emigrants to America of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Lefkimmi –  a village with a wide long sandy beach that is quiet due to being in the less busy South. There’s a practical taverna with a children’s playground. The waters are extremely calm and very shallow, even out for quite some distance.
  • Nymphes – a big village with a lot of water, green and legends built on a height of 200 meters. According to a legend, in old times, the Nymphs used to bathe in the village’s waterfalls. A walk to the wells and the waterfalls is enough to make you understand why this legend exists. It is almost certain that you will come across a nymph, too and if you are lucky, you will see her bathe in the water especially in spring. After your walk to the myths, it is a good idea to visit the premises of the Agriculture Co-operative which elaborates kum-kuat and produces liquor and sweets. You will be offered some for free and you will have the chance to try the different liquor qualities (and of course, buy some, if you like). Just outside the village, you can visit Askitario, a small but historic monastery. According to tradition, here lived in the 5th century the monk Artemios Paissios from Epirus, who is said to have worked many wonders.
  • Old Perithia – This is the last remaining Heritage Protected Village on the island. Located in the north east, just below Mt. Pantokrator, the village nestles in a Designated Area of Natural Beauty and records date back to c. 1350. The village is made up of 130 houses and surrounded by 8 churches, it has 4 tavernas and 1 boutique bed & breakfast making ot one of the most unique and unspoiled places to stay and a regular feature of the Durrell Week that takes place around May each year as it’s perfect for walkers and those interested in flora, fauna, insects and wildlife. A hideaway from Pirate attacks, the village has views to, but cannot be seen, from the sea, eventually tourism in the late 1960s and 1970s drove villagers towards the coast but it always remained inhabited. Today, locals and visitors alike travel to the village to see the ruins and restorations – the food is ‘mountain prices’ and often locally sourced. Such is the popularity of the village that Corfiots visit at weekends throughout the winter, to sit around the fires and enjoy the authentic Corfiot dishes. Some of the best beaches on the island are 20 minutes (8 km) drive away so you can enjoy slip away during the day and return to the peace and quiet of ‘your own village’ as the sun sets over the mountain tops.
  • Roda – a village resort on Corfu’s northern coast. Traditionally a fishing village, the area has retained its character while developing in to a popular destination for holidays. Unique in the sense that the old village still exists at the heart of the resort, locals mix with the different nationalities who visit time and time again. Roda is a contained resort, without the typical sprawl. There is plenty of accommodation, bars, restaurants which offer a wide range of menus, typical Greek and Corfiot dishes, Italian, Chinese and others. Roda is a relaxed resort but has a great nightlife, with nice bands, singers and comedy shows as well as the ever popular kareoke. If you want a laid back holiday, then Roda is the place, with quiet corners and a beautiful sandy beach, Roda offers something for everyone.

Understand

The satisfactory infrastructure and the multiple possibilities for various activities are conducive for group holidays on Corfu and the nearby islands. Motivation trips, congress tourism, school trips, Ferrari or antique cars clubs and Harley Davidson groups meet here every year.

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Former founder of Asiarooms.com and now reporting mainly on the Asia Pacific region and the global Coronavirus crises in countries such as Thailand, Germany & Switzerland. Born near Cologne but lived in Berlin during my early teenage years. A longterm resident of Bangkok, Udon Thani, Sakon Nakhon and Phuket. A great fan of Bali, Rhodes & Corfu.

Greece

Athens Coronavirus COVID-19 Update in Greece

Wolfgang Holzem

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Named after Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom, Athens is the oldest, and maybe liveliest, capital in Europe. The urban city area features a bit more than 4 million residents, according to the latest census in 2011; however, every true Athenian will insist that the capital boasts half of Greece’s total population (which is about 11 million people).

Greece
186,469
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
6,410
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.4%
Deaths (%)
165,095
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
88.5%
Recovered (%)
14,964
Active
8.0%
Active (%)

Athens is often considered as an one-day stop-over, before starting island hopping; however, while summers in Athens can be a nightmare due to the combination of high temperatures, air pollution and severe lack of greenery, it is still worth a few days on its own. Balancing between European elegance and Balkan temperament, the Greek capital reveals its true self through lazy walks among ancient ruins, people watching during a typical Athenian half-day-long coffee and endless bar hopping until dawn.

The first pre-historic settlements were constructed in 3000 BC around the hill of Acropolis. According to legend the King of Athens, Theseus, unified the ten tribes of early Athens into one kingdom in around 1230 BC. This process of synoikismos – bringing together in one home – created the largest and wealthiest state on the Greek mainland, but it also created a larger class of people excluded from political life by the nobility.

By the 7th century BCE, social unrest had become widespread, and the Areopagus appointed Draco to draft a strict new law code (hence “draconian”). When this failed, they appointed Solon, with a mandate to create a new constitution (594). This was the great beginning of a new social revolution, which was the result of the democracy under Clisthenes (508).

In the 5th century BCE, Athens reached the peak of its fame. It was the most powerful Greek city-state, and the center of Greek cultural life, hosting perhaps the greatest cultural advances in all of human history. Fields of study like science, philosophy, history, and medicine were developed for the first time by Athenian scholars in this period, known as Athens’ “golden age”.

Later on, Athens became part of the Macedonian empire under Alexander, and still later part of the Roman empire. While it was no longer politically significant, its intellectual reputation gave it a special status until, in the year 529, Emperor Justinian ordered Athens’ academies to be closed, and the empire’s intellectual center moved to Constantinople.

Athens was thriving and prosperous during the Crusades, actually benefiting from the Italian trade during this period, however this fruitful period was short-lived, as Greece suffered badly under the Ottoman Empire, only to recover in the 19th century as the capital of independent Greece. In modern times, the Athens urban area has grown to a population of 3 million. Athens has turned into a large and bustling city, but as a result it also suffers from congestion, pollution, and poverty.

Modern Olympic Games

Athens hosted the 2004 Summer Olympic Games. While most of the sporting venues were outside of the city – in various locations throughout Attica- the entire urban area of Athens underwent major lasting changes that have improved the quality of life for visitors and residents alike. Aside from the excellent transportation infrastructure that was completed in time for the 2004 Olympics (from new freeways to light rail systems), the city’s historic center underwent serious renovation. Most notable among the city’s facelift projects are the Unification of Archaeological Sites (which connects the city’s classical-era ruins and monuments to each other through a network of friendly pedestrianized streets) and the restoration of the picturesque neoclassical Thissio and Pláka districts.

The ancient Olympic Games took place in Olympia from 776 BCE to 394 AD. It is a lengthy day trip from Athens to visit Olympia, but quite interesting.

Architecture

Athens was just a small provincial village when it was chosen in the 1830s to serve as the national capital of the modern Greek State. Although it had a prestigious past, the city’s political, economic and cultural importance had declined over the centuries, leaving behind only its classical ruins as a reminder of better times. With the decision to move the national capital from Nafplio to Athens, architects and city planners were hired to build a new city next to the classical ruins, with grand neoclassical homes and public buildings, large city squares, green spaces, and wide avenues, making a conscious, decisive turn from the city’s Ottoman past. The city regained its importance in Greek civilization, and by 1900 had evolved into a very attractive cosmopolitan city, with abundant neoclassical architecture harking to the nation’s past.

The 20th century however, marked the rapid development of Athens. The city suffered minor damage during WWII, and suffered extensive urban planning in the decades that followed, as the nation rapidly industrialized and urbanized. In the 1960s and 1970s, many 19th century neoclassical buildings, often small and private, were demolished to make way for office buildings, often designed by great Greek architects. The city also expanded outward through rash development, particularly towards the west, as its population grew by absorbing job-seekers from the provinces. With the onset of the automobile, public officials reduced the city’s public transportation services without foreseeing the traffic gridlock and smog that would menace the city by the 1980s.

By the late 1980s and early 1990s, the city’s reality led to a rude awakening among local and national officials and, coupled with the country’s new found remarkable prosperity, large scale projects began to slowly regenerate the city and undo some of the damage of recent decades. Over the course of the next 15 years, money was poured into new transportation infrastructure projects, the restoration of surviving neoclassical buildings, the gentrification of the city’s historical center and the renovation of many former industrial areas and the city’s coastline. The restoration of charming neoclassical buildings in the city’s historical center has been accompanied by the construction of attractive post-modern buildings in newer districts; both of which have begun to improve the aesthetic essence of the city. Athens today is ever evolving, forging a brand new identity for the 21st century.

Weather in Athens

Spring and late autumn are the best times to visit Athens. Summer can be extremely hot and dry during heatwaves, but this rarely happens. Winter is definitely low season, with the occasional rainy or snowy day, but also an ideal time to save money while enjoying the city without countless other tourists.

Whilst peak traffic hour can be a bit smoggy on the main roads, on most sunny days the skies are azure blue. The main reason attributed for the pollution of Athens is because the city is enclosed by mountains in a basin which does not allow the smog to leave. The government’s ban on diesel vehicles within Athens and the early 1990s initiatives to improve car emissions have greatly contributed to better atmospheric conditions in the basin.

Orientation

The sprawling city is bounded on three sides by Mt. Ymettos, Mt. Parnitha and Mt. Pendeli; whilst inside Athens are twelve hills [the seven historical are: Acropolis, Areopagus, Hill of Philopappus, Observatory Hill (Muses Hill), Pnyx, Lycabettus, Tourkovounia (Anchesmus)], the Acropolis and Lykavittos being the most prominent. These hills provide a refuge from the noise and commotion of the crowded city streets, offering amazing views down to Saronic Gulf, Athens’ boundary with the Aegean Sea on its southern side. The streets of Athens (signposted in Greek and English) now melt imperceptibly into Piraeus, the city’s ancient, and still bustling, port.

Places of interest to travellers can be found within a relatively small area surrounding the city centre at Syntagma Square (Plateia Syntagmatos). This epicentre is surrounded by the districts of the Plaka to the south, Monastiraki to the west, Kolonaki to the east and Omonia to the north. Further afield is the port of Athens, the Piraeus.

The Acropolis is the ancient high city of Athens, a prominent plateaued rock perched high above the modern city with commanding views and an amazing array of ancient architecture, mostly from the Classical period of Ancient Greece, the most famous of which is the Parthenon. A visit to Athens is not complete without visiting the Acropolis; hundreds of tourists each day accordingly make the pilgrimage.

Gentrified during the 1990s and now very popular with tourists, Plaka is a charming historic district at the foot of the Acropolis, with its restored 19th-century neoclassical homes, pedestrianized streets, shops and restaurants, and picturesque ruins from the city’s Roman era. Thissio, to the west side of the Acropolis, is very similar and now houses many restaurants and cafes. Between the two is Monastiraki, a very bohemian district increasingly popular with tourists, with stores selling a variety of items including antiques, cookware, souvenirs, arts and crafts, movie posters, punk culture, funky clothing, and pretty much anything you can think of. Another part of Plaka is Anafiotika and is on the northernmost place. There you will find the first university of Athens before it was relocated in central Athens. Its an oasis of calm and quietness, and there are many green spaces which are part of the green space of Acropolis.

Plaka’s boundaries are not precisely defined. Clear borders are the Ancient Agora and Plateia Monastiraki on the west, the Acropolis and Dhionysiou Areopayitou street on the south, the Temple of Olympian Zeus and Leoforos Amalias on the south-east, and the west part of Mitropoleos street, up to the cathedral on the north (but Mitropoleos street and Leoforos Amalias, though boundaries, shouldn’t be considered part of Plaka, since they have a modern and fairly non-descript atmosphere). The north-eastern and eastern boundaries are a bit less well defined, but if you’re south of Apollonos street and west of Nikis street you’ll probably feel like you’re still in Plaka.

Syntagma Square is named after the Greek constitution (syntagma) that was proclaimed from the balcony of the royal palace that overlooks the square on 3 September 1843. The former palace has housed the Greek parliament since 1935.

Syntagma Square is a good point from which to begin your orientation in the city, and has been beautified within the last few years ago, and the manic Athenian traffic has been re-routed. it contains cafes, restaurants, fast food outlets, a new metro stop, airline offices.. The square serves as an occasional rallying place for demonstrations and public celebrations.

Omonia Square (Plateia Omonias) is the centre of Athens, and is composed of the actual square together with the surrounding streets, open areas and assemblage of grand buildings that include banks and offices. The neighbouring area of Exarcheia (Εξάρχεια) to the north, dominated by the Athens Polytechnic and its famous band of anarchists, is a bohemian district with lots of bars and clubs visited by students, intellectuals and people who are into alternative culture. Kolonaki is near Lykavittos Hill. The district’s borders are not very sharply defined; it covers the south and southeast slopes of Lykavettos Hill north of Vassilisis Sofias Avenue. Kolonaki is the posh area of central Athens. Traditionally the home of the in-town rich, it’s the location of a number of foreign embassies and several prominent archaeological schools, including The American School and The British School. It also has the city’s greatest concentration of trendy fashion boutiques, and many, mostly upscale, cafes, bars and restaurants.

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Corfu

Explore the Towns and Villages of Corfu Island

Wolfgang Holzem

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  • Corfu Town – known in modern Greek as Kerkira or Kerkyra, is the largest and most important town on the island. This is where the airport is located and where most cruise ships and long distance ferries dock. It is a small, pleasant city catering well to tourists. Its old town is listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Villages

  • Arillas – A beach resort that still feels like a village. Arillas has a long and wide sandy beach at the northwest corner of Corfu. Beautiful nature, clear waters and a beach offering much privacy. Many naturists have been coming to Arillas for decades because of this, so if you wander off to the left or right side of the beach, be prepared to encounter naked people! Arillas is also developing fast as one of the biggest spiritual spots of the world. There are three spiritual centers offering different courses on meditation, chanting, dancing, creative arts and also many people practicing all kinds of massage. Ideal to relax body, mind and spirit. The village is also famous for its festivals. The first is held on Ascension day (40 days after Easter, 13 June for 2020), another is held in the first weekend of August and the Wine festival is held on the first weekend of September. Many hundreds of people come to Arillas from all Northern Corfu to enjoy traditional dancing, great souvlakia, local wine, and the famous, fresh Corfu Beer which is produced in the village.
  • Benitses  – a very old, traditional fishing village. Benitses lies 12 km south of Corfu Town, and leads to the emerald valley. The water of the springs which flow from the mountains of Aghii Deka and Stavros, join together in two small rivers, giving the area the name Pinisse (derived from the ancient Greek word ‘Pinio’) = Pinitse = Benitses. The mild climate and the natural beauty of Benitses village has attracted a lot of tourists from the beginning of the century. It is only during the last 30 years that tourism has replaced all other sources of income and now is the sole occupation of the inhabitants during the summer season. The coastal road of Benitses is full of hotels, restaurants, cafes and other shops that offering everything the most demanding visitor can ask. Benitses is surrounded by the mountains in one side and the aquamarine waters of the Ionian Sea in the other, this unique combination of nature with the hospitality of the residents, which are very familiar with different cultures, are what make visitors to love the place. 3km to the north there is the famous Achilleion palace.
  • Kalami  – the village is where the British novelist Lawrence Durrell and his wife Nancy Isobel Myers chose to live from 1935 until the Greek surrender in April 1941
  • Kassiopi  – One of the more relaxed and atmospheric resorts with a pretty bay and beach that is mostly stony. The waters are crystal clear and calm. Somewhat spoilt by the prevalence of tacky tourist bars and cafes catering to the many English tourists that crowd the town.
  • Kavos – a seaside village on the island of Corfu in Greece, in the municipal district and the municipality of Lefkimmi. It is now a lively resort heavily devoted to tourism, and popular with young holidaymakers from Britain and Northern Europe.
  • Kynopiastes  – a traditional village of the Messi Region of Corfu and only 10 km away from Corfu town and airport, which is a must visit. Old mansions of the 17th to 19th centuries, a marble church, a 17th-century monastery and a museum (and the only one on the island) devoted to the olive tree with one of the world famous restaurants on the island tavern «Trypas», which has hosted Kings ike the Kings of Greece and England, Presidents of Countries like Konstantinos Karamanlis (Greece) and François Mitterrand (France), stars of the European and American cinema and music, like Jane Fonda, and Anthony Quinn. The narrow tiled paths invite you to walk on them, looking at the small squares and at the houses which preserve the traditional colors. The main church is devoted to the Virgin Mary and it is in the central square. It is a traditional church with unique architecture and an impressive marble entrance. Inside, there are frescoes of the 18th century Ionian School of Painting. At the edge of the village there is the monastery of Agia Paraskevi, built in the 17th century.
  • Lakones – a typical Corfiot village on the slope of a green hill. You should go for a walk to Bella Vista to admire the view over the bay of Paleokastritsa and relax in one of the picturesque coffee shops. If you like trekking there is a path leading down to Paleokastritsa. The surnames of the inhabitants of the region refer to the soldiers who supported Angelokastro in the late Byzantine period, as well as to refugees from Mani. Among the houses of the 18th and 19th centuries you will find churches and traditional coffee shops. At the central church you will see donations of the first emigrants to America of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Lefkimmi –  a village with a wide long sandy beach that is quiet due to being in the less busy South. There’s a practical taverna with a children’s playground. The waters are extremely calm and very shallow, even out for quite some distance.
  • Nymphes – a big village with a lot of water, green and legends built on a height of 200 meters. According to a legend, in old times, the Nymphs used to bathe in the village’s waterfalls. A walk to the wells and the waterfalls is enough to make you understand why this legend exists. It is almost certain that you will come across a nymph, too and if you are lucky, you will see her bathe in the water especially in spring. After your walk to the myths, it is a good idea to visit the premises of the Agriculture Co-operative which elaborates kum-kuat and produces liquor and sweets. You will be offered some for free and you will have the chance to try the different liquor qualities (and of course, buy some, if you like). Just outside the village, you can visit Askitario, a small but historic monastery. According to tradition, here lived in the 5th century the monk Artemios Paissios from Epirus, who is said to have worked many wonders.
  • Old Perithia – This is the last remaining Heritage Protected Village on the island. Located in the north east, just below Mt. Pantokrator, the village nestles in a Designated Area of Natural Beauty and records date back to c. 1350. The village is made up of 130 houses and surrounded by 8 churches, it has 4 tavernas and 1 boutique bed & breakfast making ot one of the most unique and unspoiled places to stay and a regular feature of the Durrell Week that takes place around May each year as it’s perfect for walkers and those interested in flora, fauna, insects and wildlife. A hideaway from Pirate attacks, the village has views to, but cannot be seen, from the sea, eventually tourism in the late 1960s and 1970s drove villagers towards the coast but it always remained inhabited. Today, locals and visitors alike travel to the village to see the ruins and restorations – the food is ‘mountain prices’ and often locally sourced. Such is the popularity of the village that Corfiots visit at weekends throughout the winter, to sit around the fires and enjoy the authentic Corfiot dishes. Some of the best beaches on the island are 20 minutes (8 km) drive away so you can enjoy slip away during the day and return to the peace and quiet of ‘your own village’ as the sun sets over the mountain tops.
  • Roda – a village resort on Corfu’s northern coast. Traditionally a fishing village, the area has retained its character while developing in to a popular destination for holidays. Unique in the sense that the old village still exists at the heart of the resort, locals mix with the different nationalities who visit time and time again. Roda is a contained resort, without the typical sprawl. There is plenty of accommodation, bars, restaurants which offer a wide range of menus, typical Greek and Corfiot dishes, Italian, Chinese and others. Roda is a relaxed resort but has a great nightlife, with nice bands, singers and comedy shows as well as the ever popular kareoke. If you want a laid back holiday, then Roda is the place, with quiet corners and a beautiful sandy beach, Roda offers something for everyone.

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Greece

Heraklion : Travel Guide, with Info on Nightlife, What to See & Covid-19 Report

Wolfgang Holzem

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Crete’s largest city and capital, Heraklion is an urban maze with little greenery and sometimes hectic traffic; however, hidden treasures are nestled among the concrete chaos of unregulated structured modern buildings.

Known from ancient times as Knossos’ port, the city had been under Arab and Venetian occupation in the Middle Ages, only to change conquerors in the 17th century, when Ottomans invaded its forts.

In recent history, Heraklion went under a major facelift before 2004, as it was one of Greece’s Olympic Cities. The historic center was pedestrianized and the waterfront was heavily reformed; today locals stroll or bike by the sea in crisp summer evenings.

Greece
186,469
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
6,410
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.4%
Deaths (%)
165,095
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
88.5%
Recovered (%)
14,964
Active
8.0%
Active (%)

Getting around

Most of the city’s places of interest are located within the historic center, where distances are more than walkable. Frequent public transport serves the most remote attractions.

Historic Center and Waterfront

Venetians entrenched Chandacas (former name of Heraklion) with massive city walls. The municipal area within the walls is today called the Historic Center of the city.

Within the Historic Center one will find the Archaeological Museum of Heraklion, which is the second greater Greek archaeological museum, after the one in Athens. Covering a time period from the Neolithic Era until the Roman Empire, it features important relics from the Minoan civilization, along with fascinating frescos from Knossos. Don’t miss Phaestos Disk, a circular disk with pictographic inscriptions that have not yet been decoded.

By the waterfront, sits the captivating Historical Museum of Crete. Founded by Andreas Kalokerinos, of the city’s most generous benefactors, it houses fascinating collections which deal with Crete’s more recent history and folk art. Two of El Greco’s original paintings are exhibited here. Other displays include artefacts and maps from Byzantine to Ottoman period. A photo-exhibition of the city’s suffering during The Battle of Crete is presented on the museum’s second floor, while the third floor hosts a collection of folklore art.

Not far away from the Historical Museum, you will find Koules Venetian Fortress. Built in the 16th century, it was primarily used to repel Turkish invaders, before it was turned into a prison for Cretan rebels. Nowadays the grounds of the Fortress are not normally open to the public; however, it is occasionally used for temporary exhibitions.

Loggia, which currently houses Heraklion’s city hall, is a fine example of Venetian architecture; built in the 17th century, its original purpose was to serve as an exclusive club for Venetian nobles. Right next to Loggia, stands the Church of Sent Titos. Initially built more than 1000 years ago, it had been destroyed and rebuilt twice, with the current structure dating back to 1856. During this time it served as a Catholic church and a mosque respectively, until 1925, when it was turned into an Orthodox church.

On the city’s main square, one will come across Morosini Fountain. Raised in early 17th century, it is also known as Lion Fountain, because of the four stone lions that decorate its upper part. Another lovely fountain stands at the end of 1866 Market Street; Babmo Fountain, or “Falte Jami” as locals call it, is adjoined to an old Turkish pump-house, which nowadays houses a traditional coffee house.

Outside the city

The Minoan Palace of Knossos is an absolute must-see for travelers in Heraklion. Considered to be Europe’s most ancient city, Knossos thrived during the Bronze Age; the palace has gone under extensive restoration and guided tours are available in the front gate. To get to the capital of the Minoan civilization, take city bus No. 2.

Marine-life enthusiasts are welcome to visit Cretaquarium. Located 15 kilometers east of the city of Heraklion, the aquarium mainly focuses on marine life of the Mediterranean Sea, boasting 2,500 marine creatures of 250 different species.

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Covid-19 Alerts Greece

Covid-19 Greece
186,469
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
0
Deaths (24h)
0
Recovered (24h)

According to the Government in Greece, Greece has confirmed 0 new Covid-19 infections within Greece in the last 24 hours and furthermore 0 deaths have been reported throughout Greece. With the new deaths of 0, Greece now has a total of 186,469 Coronavirus/Covid-19 infections and the official death rate reported by the government of Greece is 3.4%. 6,410 died in Greece.

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