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Mallorca Coronavirus (COVID-19) Majorca Travel Report

Wolfgang Holzem

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Mallorca (3640 km2) is known as an easy-to-reach mecca for friends of sunny beaches, amazing landscapes, wonderful mountains and affordable Mediterranean food. With a coastline of more than 550 km. In high season the island receives about 8 million tourists from around the world. This is both a blessing and a curse for the inhabitants, and they are well prepared for it and provide a very well-organized tourist infrastructure.

Spain Coronavirus Report
3,456,886
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
77,496
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
2.2%
Deaths (%)
3,156,955
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
91.3%
Recovered (%)
222,435
Active
6.4%
Active (%)

Nevertheless, Mallorca can show another face when you leave the coastline and take a look at the inner country. Prices fall with each kilometer you move away from the coast, and reach the usual Spanish standards in the center of the island or even some parts of the mountain area.

Geographically the island can be divided into three parts. The Serra de Tramuntana rocks extend from south-west to north-east, while the Serra de Llevant stretches along the eastern coast. Between them lies the central plain (Es pla).

The largest and most popular of the Balearics, Majorca is an island of startling contrasts. Its landscape varies from rugged mountains in the north to pine-covered hills and windmill-dotted plains in the south.

In the west, the historic and elegant capital, Palma, skirts an attractive harbour while in the east, you can explore pretty, secluded sandy coves. Despite great popularity and development, Majorca remains an astonishingly beautiful place, with verdant pines, rolling green hills, endless superb beaches and a varied choice of resorts, each with a character and flavour of its own.

Whether you want to sun yourself in peace and quiet or live it up in the hot spots until the early hours, Majorca has just the resort for you.

The furthest distance that can be traveled on this island of 581,564 inhabitants and covering an area of some 3,640 km2 is 120 km, which is the distance between Puerto de San Telm and Formentor lighthouse at Cape Formentor.

Most visitors tend to stay around only part of the coastline, many without realizing about the magnificent inland scenery of plains and mountains that can also be enjoyed.

Palma, the island’s capital, has a population of approximately 300,000, which is practically half of the entire population of the island. It stretches some 15 km along the coastline, from El Arenal and Palma beach in the east as far as the cosmopolitan districts of Cala Mayor and San Agustín in the west.

Palma is a smallish city, having all the advantages that this brings, while at the same time having all the possibilities of a much larger city. Its main source of income comes from tourism and, consequently, leisure activities of all kinds are more than well-catered- for here. There are restaurants, cafeterias , pubs, concert halls, discotheques, a bull-ring and all types of shows, offering the visitor entertainment and amusement at all times.

Tourism had already become an important aspect of life on the island of Majorca back in the early 1920’s although on a much smaller scale than today, of course. It was a select, mainly winter tourism which grew up steadily until the begins of the Spanish Civil War. The later “discovery” of Ibiza and Menorca did not occur until well after the Civil War. At that time Majorca was full of artists, who established what was, to all intents and purposes, a colony in and around Pollensa and its port. One of the most famous of them all was Anglada Camarassa.

Talk

The natives speak so-called Mallorquin, a sub-dialect of “Balear”, a regional dialect of the Catalan. Schools teach Catalan and Spanish; both are official languages in this region. Most people can speak both languages.

In tourist areas, you will frequently come across people speaking English, German, French and other common European languages.

Get in

By plane

There are frequent flights from many European cities to Palma de Mallorca Airport. In particular, many of the discount airlines have daily flights.

There are also flights from Menorca and Ibiza, but these are about double the price of the ferries from these islands, and save only about an hour.

From the airport (Palma de Mallorca Airport) public buses run frequently to central Palma. Many car rental agencies have their offices at the airport.

By boat

You can catch a ferry to Palma de Mallorca from the other Balearic Islands or from several points on the Spanish coast, including Barcelona and Valencia and a super-fast ferry service from Denia Alicante. You can catch a ferry to Alcudia from Menorca.

Get around

Many spots are reachable by bus; while transportation between the major holiday resorts is no problem, especially medium- and long-distance services may be as sparse as one bus per week; many bus routes are not served at all on Sundays, in the lower season and during the night.

There is inland train transportation, but mainly limited to Puerto de Sóller, Manacor, Inca, Sa Pobla and Sineu. Rural halts tend to be far away from town centres, but there are usually bus shuttles available. If you would like a private direct transfer to your resort on the island you could also book a private transfer from one of the many online suppliers like mytransfers.com, mozio, or holidaytaxis.

Cars can be rented in many tourist towns, especially along the coast. Unless in high season, when you should book your rental in advance if you want to ensure getting one, hiring a car directly at the airport without reservation shouldn’t be any problem at all. However, as “at desk” rental prices are often far higher than booking in advance it may be prudent to organise it from home before you arrive (and to avoid disappointment during peak periods).

What to see and do

  • Caves – several caves are open to the public, the Dragon Caves – (Coves del Drach in mallorquin) being the most visited

Beaches

This is what the most people come for. The main tourist areas are on the southern and eastern coast but places may be crowded in high season. Mallorca has beautiful white sand and crystal water beaches, so most are base for package tourists nowadays.

In more remote areas you might find very rarely visited beaches. More secluded and quiet beaches can be found on the island but expect a difficult route (e.g. cliffs) and minimal parking.

A must visit is Es Trenc, near the Colonia de Sant Jordi, but there are also many beaches not that popular worth a visit. Note – If you find yourself in Palma, looking for a quieter beach than the 5 km strand (Platja de Palma), take the line 3 of the town’s public bus company “EMT” (blue and white buses) all the way to its Western terminus “Illetes”, which is simply called Playa. It is a wonderful little cove set about by rocks, with a local restaurant right on the beach. There are other coves in either direction, but this is the most welcoming.

What to do

Punta de Capdepera

  • Hiking – The Serra de Tramuntana offers some fine trails.
  • Cycling – In spring the island’s roads are popular with several professional teams in preparation for the next season.
  • Palma – the island’s capital offers the famous cathedral as well as a nice city centre to stroll around. Cultural visits, shore excursions and trips to the Jewish quarter and other sites and villages around the Island.
  • Golf – There are eighteen, 18 hole golf courses on the island that are open to the general public. These are Andratx, Alcanada, Bendinat, Canyamel, Capdepera, Poniente, Pula, Golf Park Puntiró Mallorca, Golf Maioris, Santa Ponsa 1, Son Antem East, Son Antem West, Son Termens, Son Vida, Son Muntaner, Son Quint, Son Gual & Vall d’Or. There are two 9 holes courses open to the general public; Son Servera & Pollença. The courses Santa Ponsa 2 & 3 are ‘members only’ and finally there is a 9 hole golf course in the grounds of La Reserve Rotana, a boutique hotel located in the North-East of the island, just outside of Manacor. Balearic Golf in one of the companies that manage and offer courses in the Balearic Islands.
  • Nature
    • S’Abulfera is a large salt marsh near the town of Alcudia. Large numbers of bird species can be seen, including many species of heron, waders, ducks and warblers.
    • The cliffs of Formentor are good for sea birdwatching and are among the best places for a chance to see the rare Elenora’s Falcon.
    • One-day boat tours are available from Colonia de Sant Jordi to the Cabrera Island National Park which is located about 11 miles south of Mallorca. The Cueva Azul (Blue Cave) on Cabrera is spectacular.
  • Free Classical Music Concerts – during the summer, free open-air classical music concerts are usually organised on Saturday evenings on the Bendinat Golf Course.
  • Deep Water Solo / Psicobloc – the island’s unique geography has helped it become the premier destination for rock climbers wishing to experience deep water soloing or psicobloc, rock climbing above deep water.

Sailing and yachting

One of the best ways to discover Mallorca and the stunning Balearic islands is by boat. When it comes to yachting in the Mediterranean, you have several options: chartering, sailing aboard you own vessel, or fractional yacht ownership.

  • Yacht charter and sailing
  • Shared yacht ownership is a sound alternative to chartering a yacht in Spain. Yacht fractional ownership allows you to own a yacht at a fraction of a cost and avoid many maintenance hassles and costs.

Eat

Local dishes

Majorcan cuisine, like that of similar zones in the Mediterranean, is based on bread, vegetables and meat (specially pork), and uses olive oil throughout. A simple, popular dinner, specially during the summer, is the Pa amb Oli: Bread with olive oil, tomato, and any available condiments such as cheese, tunafish, etc. Another one is Trampó, the same but with various vegetables instead of bread.

Other local dishes include Frit Mallorquí (meat and vegetables cut up in small pieces) and Sopes Mallorquines (a simple, healthy dish made of bread and vegetables, optionally with meat, eggs, wild mushrooms, etc.). The seafood version of Paella is very recommended while in Mallorca.

Sobrassada, a rather spicy sausage made of pork, paprika, condiments, etc. is eaten plain or toasted, on a slice of bread, and it’s also used in preparing other dishes.

For breakfast, instead of croissant, try the typical Ensaïmada (a spiral-shaped bun made of dough with pork fat), and for dessert the Gató (a cake made with almond) with almond ice cream.

Finding a restaurant

Palma is most known place for dining, having probably more restaurants than the rest of the island.

For out-of-cities dining, head to Algaida: there are several great restaurants around the village.

In restaurants with average bill under €30, waiters and clients are tolerant to children even of 2–3 years old.

Drink

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Interior of the 16th-century late Gothic church, Transfiguració del Senyor in Artà

Drinking is allowed if you are 18 or older the same as in the rest of Spain. While alcohol is widely sold, pursuant to local laws only bars, restaurants, discothèques and the like are allowed to serve it after midnight.

Spanish people go out quite late and, while in the main tourist resorts you can find people drinking and chatting from early hours, you will not see many locals before 24:00.

The main nighttime areas are:

  • Magaluf: well known to be the British capital in the island, this is the place for clubbing. Bananas Disco and BCM Empire Disco are a must.
  • Paseo Maritimo: A profusion of bars can be found at Paseo Maritime in Palma, the main road by the sea. Abraxas (former Pacha) and Tito’s are the main discos, catered mostly to a young party crowd. Gay oriented bars can be found around Plaza Gomila (must visit: Hotel Aries Pub and the Black Cat Disco).

Also, you must know that while drinking in the street is allowed, big groups drinkings are not tolerated and the police will fine you if you leave any rubbish in the street. In any case, is better to carry a plastic bag for any rubbish you could have.

Wines

You should consider trying the Sangria, a mix of wine, fruit juice and brandy. Another option are the excellent local wines. Many bodegas offer tours with free tastings.

  • Ses Nines “Negre, Binissalem D.O.”, a real bargain, this pleasant red wine will accompany your barbecues. €5.
  • José L. Ferrer “Blanc de blancs, Binissalem D.O.”, a light and tasty white wine to drink with a fish soup or grilled sardines. €7.

Where to stay in Mallorca

Accommodation is mainly for the package-tour tourist who wants a room near the beach. Most of these hotels are cheaper if booked by a travel agent. But over the past few years, the number of alternative accommodations for more experienced, individual travellers has steadily been growing: designer hotels, fully equipped apartments, aparthotels and fincas to name a few.

Fincas

Rural tourism: Also known as “Agroturismo”. Refers to farmhouses and country estates built before 1960, still being used for agriculture but, of course, fully refurbished and modernized. Just perfect for families with children.

“Rural Hotel”, “Turisme d’Interior” and “Petit Hotel” on the other hand are generally former mansions and manor-houses located in smaller towns such as Sòller, Lloseta, Deià or Campanet. They offer a limited number of rooms for guests, mostly 4 star service with an excellent cuisine, Spa services, etc.

Hotels

Although the vast majority are 3 and 4 star hotels, the island does offer excellent 5 star hotels and resorts, small and trendy Designer Hotels next to Palma’s shopping district as well as charming city hotels in the old city centre of Palma de Mallorca.

If you prefer to stay in your own apartment, but don’t want to miss the hotel’s daily entertainment programme, sports and shows in the evening, then consider staying in an aparthotel. Most of them are located in the north (Alcudia, Playa de Muro) or on the east coast of the island (Cala Millor, Cala d’Or) and offer a wide range of services.

Camping

There are no commercial camp grounds in Mallorca, but there are some recreation areas with toilets and sometimes with showers where camping is allowed.

Villa rentals

Renting a villa is an excellent, often inexpensive way of enjoying Mallorca’s more secluded locations. These are generally found on the western and northern sides of the island. There are several choices, from “casitas” that are small and offer no additional services, to those which are classed as “luxury”, and offer a wide range of additional features such as a maid service, breakfast and hire cars.

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Menorca

An Introduction to Menorca Island on the Balearic Islands

Wolfgang Holzem

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The harbour at Maó, the island capital, is the second largest natural deep water port in the world – the largest being Pearl Harbour. The whole island is a European Biological Reserve and Unesco Biosphere Reserve aiming to preserve environmental areas. More than a 75% of the territory is protected. You can watch some of the last turtles of the Mediterranean, birds and protected species.

With a population of around 92,000, the island is dominated by tourists, particularly during the summer tourist season of May – October. Due to its unspoiled beauty, it allows the more adventurous the opportunity to discover new charms and experiences. Despite its smaller size among other Spanish islands, being just around 30 miles long and around 10 miles wide, the number of beaches that Menorca has equals the number of beaches that can be found in Mallorca and Ibiza combined.

An identifying sign of Menorca is its fascination with horses. All things centre around horses and the people love them. Menorca has its own race of black horses. In all the festivities the horses and their “caixers” (riders) are the centrepieces. The “Cami de Cavalls” is a pathway surrounding the island for horse riding and it was used in the past for defense of the coast by horse, literally translating to horse path.

If you do take time to explore the interior you will discover a wealth of interesting and historic landmarks from El Toro (the highest point on the island) to the most significant prehistoric sites at Trepucó and Torre d’en Galmés.

To this day no one is certain of the significance of these prehistoric monuments in the form of Taules, T-shaped stone formations thought to be spiritual sanctuaries; Talayots which are stone towers that local people believe were once used as look-out points. There is little evidence to support these theories about Menorca’s prehistoric past nor the original function of these breathtaking creations . Taules are named after the Menorquí word for table. (Menorquí is the local dialect of Catalan which is widely spoken on the Island). Menorca is by far the richest place in Europe for sites of prehistoric settlements, mostly dating from the Talaiotic Period, which was the period of civilisation between 2000 and 1000 BC. The term Talayot is believed to originate from the Arabic atalaya meaning “watch tower”.

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Oviedo Coronavirus (COVID-19) Asturias Travel Report

Wolfgang Holzem

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Oviedo or Uviéu (in Asturian language) is a cathedral city, capital of Principality of Asturias, in Northern Spain. It has an interesting old town with various monuments listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Spain Coronavirus since reopening
3,456,886
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
77,496
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
2.2%
Deaths (%)
3,156,955
Recovered
0
Recovered (24h)
91.3%
Recovered (%)
222,435
Active
6.4%
Active (%)

Credit/Source: Sentosa Medical Exchange Germany & Singapore

Get in

By plane

Airport of Asturias  is approximately 40km away from Oviedo. The airport is located on the outskirts of the town of Aviles. Asturias airport has flights to and from London (Heathrow, Stansted and Gatwick), Lisbon, Munich and Venice.

The bus is by far the cheapest way to get to Oviedo from the airport (8 euros). An ALSA coach will leave you in the Bus station, very close to the centre, with connections to local buses, taxis and the train station next to Buses are on the right as you exit the terminal and leave every hour from 6.00am to midnight. The journey takes from 40 to 50 minutes.

A taxi will cost around € 46 and take 20 to 25 minutes

By Coach

The Oviedo Coach Station (calle Pepe Cosmen, tel. +34 902499949) is located in the centre of town, next to the Oviedo train station. There are coach routes to most towns in Asturias and the North of Spain, as well as Madrid and some other Spanish large cities, like Seville and Barcelona. International coach routes link Oviedo daily with Paris, Brussels and Genève There is a Tourist Information Office at the bus station (tel. + 34 985117050).

By train

Oviedo train station (calle Pepe Cosmen) is on the north side of la Calle Uría (the center of the city), where there are many connecting local bus routes. There is also a taxi stand just outside the station. It is next to the coach station.

By car

There is a convenient ring-road,with various exits into Oviedo. There are places to charge, but they are not near, check directions before getting into A6. Lugones will be your easy option to return. To Oviedo, freeway will take by car in less than 20min to Gijón or Avilés.

Distances to/from Oviedo: Madrid 450 km, Bilbao 305 km, A Coruna 325 km, Gijon 30 km

Get around

The best way to get around is by walking.

Most of the center of the city can only be visited that way, because little motor traffic is allowed. Where traffic is possible, be prepared for jams and narrow passes, as sometimes parking is permitted on both sides of the road.

The local Buses (Autobuses Urbanos de Oviedo, tel. +34 985222422) are fairly reliable, and on every bus stop there is a screen with the time for arrival of the next bus. Almost all local buses go down Calle Uria. The single fare is €1.20 (children under 4 free).

There are plenty of taxis, although they are not cheap. Minimum charge at non-peak hours is 4€. Although they can be found on taxi ranks and on the streets, you can contact one of two companies directly: Radio Taxi Ciudad de Oviedo (tel. +34 985250000) or Radio Taxi Principado (tel. +34 985252500); if you need to go from Oviedo to the airport. and from the airport to Oviedo, and you prefer taxi drivers who speak English; you can reserve it by email: contacta@taxioviedo.com, or by phone (+34 615980000). Final prices, taxes included in 2016 are 40€. If you prefer other companies, prices are from 53€

What to see and do

  • The old part of Oviedo is called the “Casco Antiguo”. Wander along cobbled streets admiring its beautifully restored buildings and squares. Some of the most outstanding are the Velarde Palace (which hosts part of the Art Museum), the Town Hall, the plaza del Fontán, the Palace of Toreno and the Palace of Camposagrado.
  • The old town also hosts Oviedo’s splendid Cathedral of San Salvador. Although predominantly Gothic, some IXth century pre-Romanesque sections can still be seen.
  • The churches of San Miguel de Lillo and Santa Maria del Naranco are two quaint little pre-Romanesque churches, both on a hill just outside Oviedo, a short distance one from another. A regular local bus line will take you to both of them.
  • Museum of Fine Arts.  Santa Ana, 1 and Rúa, 8 (open Tue-Sun, only mornings on Sun and holidays, free entrance.
  • Museum of the Church.  Corrada del Obispo (open Monday – Saturdayt, free on Thursday afternoons.

The Tourist Information office is just next to plaza de la Constitución, just the other side of the archway under the Town Hall on the right (calle Cimadevilla, 4, open Monday – Saturdayt, 10am-7pm, tel. +985213385, e-mail ofiturio@princast.es).

What to do

Local festivals

There are plenty of local festivities, in which local food, folk groups and local costumes are the main attraction:

  • Fair of La Ascensión (variable date in May). It is a fair devoted to the countryside with an arts and crafts market, local produce and folk groups playing in the streets.
  • La Balesquida or Countryside Tuesday (first Tuesday of Whitsun). The main event is a procession that takes place in the square in front of the Cathedral, followed by the handing-out of bollu preñau (pronounced boyo preniau), or chorizo-filled bun.
  • La Hoguera de San Juan. The night of the 23rd of June (St. John), bonfires are lit all over the city and in the square of the Cathedral. There is also a fountain-decorating contest.
  • Fiestas de San Mateo are mostly a cultural affair with plays and concerts scheduled for the week leading up to St-Mathew’s Day. America Day in Asturias takes place on the 19th of September in honour of the Asturian emigrants. A procession takes place through the main streets. On St. Mathew’s day itself (21st of september) there is a hand-out of bollu preñau and wine, and at the end of the day fireworks in Parque de Invierno.

Buy

The old-town is full of small traditional shops. There is an open-air market in the main square on most days, which is worth a look. The traditional covered maket is close to the Plaza de la Constitución. Close to the covered market there are various shops that sell traditional foodstuff and cider. There are also various large shopping malls in Oviedo. The shopping malls offer uninterrupted shopping hours, from 10am to about 9PM. Other shops and businesses in Spain tend to close from 2pm-5pm:

  • Intu Asturias (people knows it as Parque Principado), which is located just outside Oviedo. The D1 and H1 bus goes from El Cristo and Serrano St, respectively, and takes about 30 minutes to get there, with stops along the way. Once there, you have about 110 shops, with the flagship hypermarket Familia flanking one end, and an eclectic range of restaurants, 11-screen cinema, bowling alley, casino, children’s amusements on the other end. Parque Principado is situated in a sprawling industrial estate, which also boasts stores such as MediaMarkt, AKI (a DIY superstore), Conforama for furniture and an IKEA.
  • There is another shopping mall called Los Prados which can be reached by bus no. 2,4,7 and 11. These buses can be caught from central Oviedo. This mall has Asturias’ only IMAX theatre offering movies in 3D, as well as a traditional 14-screen cinema. The range of shops is not as impressive as that of El Parque Principado, however.
  • The main shopping malls in central Oviedo are Salesas and Modoo. Salesas hosts Spain’s main department store El Corte Inglés, a huge supermarket Hipercor, as well as various fashion stores and a Burger King. Modoo (people knows it as Calatrava) features many stores like El Corte Inglés, Game, La Casa del Libro, Real Oviedo store… (For Real Oviedo see below)
  • There is a Corte Inglés situated in Uría St. This one is the biggest and the best of Oviedo.

Eat

There are many places to eat in the old-town, both indoors and in small secluded squares such as El Fontán or Gascona, to name just two. Down calle Gascona you will be able to get a huge set menu for around €10. The set menu (menú del día) may not be on the menu you are given, so you may have to ask.

Typical dishes of Oviedo are those common to all of Asturias. The Fabada Asturiana is a bean stew with a reputation all over Spain that is worth trying (maybe not in the evening!). A really well known Asturian dish is the Cachopo, this one is meat with ham and cheese all breaded. The Cachopo deserves a try. Fish and shellfish are of great quality. A local cheesecabrales, also has an excellent reputation, especially if you like strong flavours. Less known are the gamoneu and afuega’l pitu cheeses. Asturias also has a tradition for rice pudding (arroz con leche).

There are many popular places to eat, the more known are: Tierra Astur (in Gascona there are two down the street there is a grill with local products and up the street there is the restaurant with every product said above. Also in the Fontán there are two: Casa Ramón with fish from the shores and Casa Amparo. Near the Cathedral there are many places to drink and eat tapas, like Plaza del Riego with restaurants of ham and El Reloj de Porlier with its great asturian and international food.

Drink

Cider (sidra) is something that should not be missed. The cider you will find in Asturias is natural cider and has a reputation all over Spain. Drinking cider in Asturias is a ritual in itself: it is poured from on high in order to incorporate air into the cider as it falls from the bottle to the glass. When you get your glass of cider it will be naturally fizzy. You are meant to drink in one gulp what the waiter offers you, leaving a little in the base of the glass. You then pour what’s left out of the glass and leave the glass on the table until the waiter offers you more. Be aware that cider pouring is a messy business and the floor will get very, very wet and sticky (which is why the floors of sidrerías are covered in sawdust).

In many other bars and restaurants there is cider available. Look out for signs saying “Sidrería” or “Chigre”. The best place to find a number of Sidrerías by far is La Calle Gascona {100 mts from the Cathedral}. There are also plenty of wine bars close to Gascona street, on Calle Jovellanos. Do not miss El Patio de los Naranjos with friendly staff, good wine and tapas.

In the past bars used to close very late, but now there is a time schedule: Su-Th – bars close at 3:00am, discos close at 5:00am. Fri-Sat – bars close at 5:30am, discos close at 7:00am.

There are mainly 3 areas:

  • El Cristo. In this area you can find mostly bars and pubs, and some after hour. Mostly middle age people in their 30s and 40s.
  • El Rosal. It is where large numbers of youth go on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday afternoons and evenings (7pm to 3am). Once the teens have left, youngsters in their early 20s will take their place.
  • La calle Mon. The vast majority of people end their night in this narrow and noisy street. People here are usually in their 20s and 30s. Erasmus students can be regularly found in “El Escondite” and on Tuesdays in the “Asturiano”, for the Erasmus quiz.

Where to stay in Oviedo (Spain)

There are plenty of hotels of all categories in and near the old-town. If you are traveling by car, you might want to consider staying in a dwelling in a smaller village nearby (casas de aldea). There are two hostels in Oviedo:

  • Oviedo Youth Hostel “Ramón Menéndez Pidal”. C/ Julián de Clavería, 14, tel. +34 986 96 65 70
  • Ibis Hotel (Cheap hotel with modern rooms) Calle Ernesto Winter Blanco, 6. +34 985 11 43 75. From 20 €
  • Eurostars Reconquista (Best known hotel where famous people stay. The Kings of Spain, Shigeru Miyamoto, Francis Ford Coppola…), C/Gil de Jaz 16 ,  fax+34 985 23 78 09From 80 €.
  • Ayre Hotel Oviedo (City centre hotel in Oviedo with modern rooms), C/Policarpo Herrero nn (In Modoo at the back of the main entrance) ,  fax+34 985 22 15 54A hotel with modern rooms, a Congress room and many other facilities. From 60 €.
  • NH PrincipadoSan Francisco, 6, +34.98.5217792. Located in the historical centre of the city, a few meters from the Cathedral, the Campoamor Theatre, the entrance scene of the prizes of the Princess of Asturias and in front of the Historical Building of the University of Oviedo.

Views

For enjoying good views the best place is the Cristo. To go there you can go walking, following many routes and stopping at fountains and the Santa María del Naranco and Miguel de Lillo churches.

You can go by car/taxi that will be faster but you will lose the churches.

Go next

Asturias is full of coastal and mountain villages all worth visiting and spending some time in (Luanco, Cudillero, Villaviciosa…). The other major towns in the area are Gijón, a lively coastal town, with a beach worth visiting, and Aviles The Picos de Europa National Park, on the other hand, is a great place for hiking and climbing.

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La Aldea de San Nicolás Agaete Roque Bormejo Coronavirus outbreak

Wolfgang Holzem

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The western part of Gran Canaria is mostly a destination for nature lovers.

Get in

Use the roads or port  Puerto de las Nieves in Agaete.

Towns

La Aldea de San Nicolás

  • CactualdeaOpen daily from 10 am to 6 pmA cactus park located about 2 km south of San Nicolás near the small town of Tocodomán. In addition to these South and Central American plants, there are also numerous other succulents from all over the world such as Euphorbia, Agave and Aloe. Next to a shop there is a wine cellar (with cactus liqueur) and a restaurant. Admission €7, incl. Menu €13.
  • Mirador del BalcónA lookout point on the coastal road GC-200 with parking. Good view to Puerto de las Nieves at Agaete and to the southwest side of the neighboring Tenerife island.
  • Los AzulejosStrange colored rock formations. There are smaller parking spaces at some points of interest, and a bar at the most beautiful spot.

Agaete

  • Iglesia de La ConcepciónA church from the year 1874.
  • Virgen de las NievesA small church with a Triptych by a 16th-century Flemish painter.

Other destinations

  • Tamadaba RangeThe only real mountain range on the island, covered with forests of Canarian pines. The range is a natural park, thus hiking is limited to the marked paths. The cliffs allow for sport climbing activities too.
  • Roque BormejoA small tuff mountain with a sanctuary of the pre-hispanic inhabitants to be found on its summit.

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