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Australia

Australia sent letter to the SG of the United Nations, refuting China’s sovereign position in the South China Sea

Australia stated to the United Nations that China’s sovereignty position in the South China Sea is not in conformity with international law and has challenged China after the United States denied the legitimacy of the nine-dash line in the South China Sea.

Earlier this month, the United States formally rejected China’s claim for sovereignty over most of the South China Sea. China reacted strongly to this, saying that the US’s position had increased tensions in the region.

Australia sent a letter to UN Secretary General Guterres on July 24, stating Australia’s position on the sovereignty dispute in the South China Sea.

The nine-dash line has no legal basis

Australia rejects China’s claim of “historical rights or maritime rights established in the historical practice of the South China Sea” and points out that China’s sovereignty requirements for disputed areas in the South China Sea do not comply with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea or the International Court of Arbitration.

Australia also questioned China’s claim that its sovereignty over the Paracel Islands and Spratly Islands has been widely recognized by the international community. In the letter, Australia cited as an example that both Vietnam and the Philippines opposed China’s statement.

China claims that it has sovereignty over almost all waters of the South China Sea, while Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam have stated that they have sovereignty over some islands.

Taiwan is the legal successor of the Republic of China, and the territory of the Republic of China shows that it has sovereignty over most of the South China Sea.

The South China Sea has a large amount of energy resources, and it is also one of the most important sea passages in the world. The value of goods passing through here is as high as 3 trillion US dollars every year.

In recent years, China has built seven artificial islands in this area, built military airfields, installed radars, and established other military facilities on them and China claimed that these bases are built for peaceful purposes.

US and Australia challenge the CCP’s militarization of the South China Sea

Australia has always insisted on freedom of navigation in the South China Sea, and advocates that all claimant countries resolve their disputes in accordance with international law.

US Secretary of State Pompeo formally expounded the US policy stance on the South China Sea this month and said that China’s claim to the sovereignty of this area lacks sufficient legal basis and intimidated and bullied neighboring countries in this sea area for many years.

The Chinese mission to the United Nations has not yet responded to Australia’s statement, but it stated earlier this month that the US’s position “ignores history and facts”.

Pompeo’s speech is a major adjustment to the United States’ long-standing neutral policy on the South China Sea issue. Analysts believe that this change shows that the United States will take a more confrontational stance against China in this region.

For a long time, the United States has opposed the militarization of the South China Sea and has often sent warships there to ensure freedom of navigation in this area.

The US-Australia annual meeting will be held at the end of the month

The Australian Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Minister of Defence plan to travel to Washington to attend the US-Australia annual meeting scheduled for July 28.

This will be Australia’s first face-to-face meeting with US officials since it closed its borders during the pandemic. Australian Foreign Minister Payne and Defense Minister Reynolds issued a statement on Saturday that the Australia-US annual meeting was held at a “critical moment.”

Relations between Australia and China have deteriorated significantly recently, and the two sides have differences on many issues. What irritates Beijing most is Australia’s call for the international community to launch an independent international investigation into the source of the new corona virus. The virus pandemic first occurred in Wuhan and later spread to the world, causing huge economic and life losses to all countries in the world.

Australia and China navy confrontation in the ​​South China Sea

Earlier this month, five Australian warships met and confronted Chinese naval vessels in the South China Sea. After the incident, Australian officials deliberately downplayed the incident, stating that “all interactions with foreign warships were conducted in a safe and professional manner during the entire deployment process.”

According to ABC reports, the Australian warship did not enter the waters within 12 nautical miles of the disputed island. The Australian warship was heading to the Philippine Sea to participate in a joint US-Japan-Australia military exercise, and then to Hawaii to participate in another US-led joint military exercise.

A spokesperson for the Australian Department of Defense said that the Australian and Chinese warships had conducted “conventional professional naval exchanges” and “no confrontation occurred.”

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Reporting mainly on the Asia Pacific region and the global Coronavirus crises in countries such as Thailand, Germany & Switzerland. Born near Cologne and a longterm resident of Bangkok, Udon Thani, Sakon Nakhon and Phuket. A great fan of Bali, Rhodes & Corfu. Love to follow the English Premier League , the German Bundesliga and the Spanish La Liga.

Australia

Record number of new Corona Infections in Australia

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The spread of the coronavirus has reached a record level in Australia. According to the authorities, 501 new infections were registered within a day. This is the highest number of new infections per day since the virus spread to Australia. According to official data, the previous high was reached on March 28 with 459 new infections. 

The vast majority of new cases are concentrated in the state of Victoria, which is largely sealed off from the rest of the country with its metropolis Melbourne. A general mask requirement will come into effect in Melbourne on Thursday. The total number of coronavirus infections recorded in Australia is now almost 13,000.

Australia Coronavirus Report
27,857
Confirmed
4
Confirmed (24h)
909
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.3%
Deaths (%)
25,540
Recovered
2
Recovered (24h)
91.7%
Recovered (%)
1,408
Active
5.1%
Active (%)

As of Wednesday, 128 deaths from the pandemic were counted in the country.

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Australia

Melbourne Coronavirus Covid-19 June Lockdown Update

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Capital of Victoria State, Melbourne is Australia’s second most populous city after Sydney. A vibrant western metropolis, the city features districts with lovely colonial architecture, huge parks, stunning museums, top restaurants and an excellent market. First European residents arriving in early 19th century, the city has gone a long way until then, today being ranked as one of the world’s top liveable cities.

Australia Coronavirus since Reopening
27,857
Confirmed
909
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.3%
Deaths (%)
25,540
Recovered
2
Recovered (24h)
91.7%
Recovered (%)
1,408
Active
5.1%
Active (%)

History of Melbourne

The British settlement of Melbourne commenced in 1835 when settlers from Tasmania “purchased” land on Port Phillip Bay and the Yarra River from the local Aboriginal tribes. The streets of central Melbourne were carefully laid out in 1837, with some streets 30 metres wide. The settlement was named “Melbourne” after William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, the British Prime Minister at that time. The first British lieutenant-governor, Charles La Trobe, arrived in 1839 – his Cottage still stands and can be visited in the Kings Domain. The year 1851 was a landmark for Melbourne — the colony of Victoria was separated from New South Wales and very soon after, gold was discovered in Victoria, sparking a huge gold rush. Aspects of the gold rush history can be seen at the Gold Treasury Museum, housed in the Treasury Building built in 1858. Gold was the catalyst for several decades of prosperity lasting through to the late 1880s and examples of the ornate Victorian-era structures built during this time still stand. In 1888, the property boom collapsed and Victoria suffered the depression of the 1890s. Throughout the gold and building booms, Melbourne managed to retain its many spacious parks and gardens which remain to this day.

In 1901, the British colonies of Australia became a self-governing federation and Melbourne became the temporary capital of Australia, with the Federal Parliament meeting in the Parliament House of Victoria until 1927 when the new Federal capital of Canberra was founded. After World War II, Melbourne grew rapidly, with its mainly Anglo-Celtic population boosted by immigration from Europe, particularly from Greece and Italy. Today Melbourne has the biggest Greek population (over 800,000) of any city outside Greece and the biggest Italian population (over 230,000) of any city outside Italy. The significant pre-war Jewish population was also boosted after the war. From the mid-1970s, many immigrants came from Southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam and Cambodia. Melbourne has had a Chinese population since the gold rush of the 1850s. Chinatown has existed from that time but the population of Chinese and other East Asians has also been boosted by immigration.

New highrise buildings replaced many of Melbourne’s interesting old structures in the construction boom of the 1970s and 80s. Melbournians belatedly recognised the loss of their architectural heritage and steps were taken to protect what was left. Construction of the huge Crown Casino (briefly the largest casino in the world) in the 1990s upset some Melbournians with its introduction of a gambling culture. Melbourne’s development continues in the 2000s with the opening of the Melbourne Museum, Federation Square and the Docklands precinct.

Culture & Tradition of Melbourne

Melbourne is often called the cultural capital of Australia, with its many art galleries, film festivals, orchestras, choral and opera productions, vibrant live music scene, and a strong food, wine and coffee culture. People in Melbourne tend to dress up more than in Sydney, partly due to the colder climate. Many bars and clubs have strict dress regulations, such as requiring collars and dress shoes for men.

Particular events to note include the Melbourne International Film Festival in August, the International Art Festival in October, and the Melbourne Comedy Festival in April. There are also many concerts and exhibitions throughout the year. In addition to the Melbourne Museum, there are special museums dedicated to subjects such as science, immigration, Chinese history, Jewish history, sport, racing, film and moving image, railways, police, fire brigades and banking.

Sport

Melbournians are sports enthusiasts and particularly passionate about Australian rules football, a sport invented in Melbourne. In fact the Australian Football League (AFL) is not so much a sport as a religion in Melbourne, with 9 of the 10 Victorian teams being based in Melbourne. As a guide, the entire national competition only has 18 teams, meaning half the league is based in Melbourne alone. The AFL culminates in the AFL Grand Final in the spring, which is played every year at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. Horse racing is another passion, and the majority of the state has a public holiday on the first Tuesday of November for the racing of the Melbourne Cup, one of the world’s famous horse races. Cricket is the big summer sport and the Melbourne Cricket Ground (the ‘MCG’) is one of the world’s leading grounds. The National Sports Museum (NSM) (including the Racing Museum) Australia’s only truly dedicated multi-sports museum is also located at the MCG.

Each January, Melbourne hosts tennis’ Australian Open, one of the world’s four Grand Slam championships. In March, Melbourne hosts the first race of the Formula One season, the Formula One Grand Prix. The race is held in Albert Park in South Melbourne. Two professional Association Football teams are based in Melbourne, Melbourne Victory and Melbourne City FC; the two teams now share the new Melbourne Rectangular Stadium, commercially known as AAMI Park also playing at Etihad Stadium. The city also boasts one professional team in each rugby code, with both also playing at AAMI Park. The Melbourne Storm play rugby league in the National Rugby League, with teams throughout Australia plus one in New Zealand. The Melbourne Rebels play rugby union in Super Rugby, which features four other Australian sides and five each in New Zealand and South Africa. Melbourne is the unquestioned sporting capital of Australia with the largest arenas and two of the major sporting administrations basing their operation in Melbourne: Cricket Australia is a stone’s throw from the MCG, and the AFL games are played at both the MCG and Etihad Stadium.

Climate

The city’s climate has a notoriety for its changeability, often referred to as “four seasons in a day”. Its climate can be described generally as temperate, with warm summers and cool winters. During the summer of December to February, temperatures hover around 26–30°C (79–86°F), but it is not out of the ordinary for the city to swelter through heatwaves of over 40°C (104°F). Humidity is rarely an issue, with mildly comfortable nights down to about 16°C (61°F). With approximately 600 mm of rainfall annually, Melbourne gets only half as much rain as Sydney. October is typically the wettest month.

Winter (June–August) is usually cool with a mix of clear, sunny weather and cold & damp conditions. Temperatures in winter can range from chilly overnight lows as low as 2 °C (36 °F) to daytime highs as high as 19 °C (66 °F) at times. Light snow has been recorded in and around Melbourne during the winter months only a couple of times over the last century, although the hills east of the city however usually see a snow shower or two every winter. You should consider visiting Melbourne in the autumn and spring — temperatures during these periods are usually very pleasant, without being unbearably warm with daytime highs usually in the 20s °C (70s °F).

With such wild and unpredictable weather, it can be difficult deciding what to wear when planning a day out in Melbourne. A common tip is to wear layers of clothing, that can be removed or worn as the day goes on.

Getting around

Melbourne features an excellent public transport network. Trains, buses and the tram will get you anywhere in the city in no time. Myki card will be your passport for all means of public transport. You just top up the card at any station or 7-Eleven store and then flip it over the special machines before you enter the transportation mean of your choice. Taxis are easy to find all over the city, while cycling is an easy and popular choice for locals and tourists alike.

Image of Destination GuideSovereign Hill is a popular tourist attraction, which allows to you dive in the city’s past during Gold Rush Era.

A vivid recreation of a 19th-century gold-mine town, Sovereign Hill presents vintage shops and houses, an old steam-train station, mines and anything else such a town would feature. Visitors are also welcome to try panning for gold by the river.

For more detail on Melbourne’s history, pass by the Old Treasury.

Occupying a lovely 19th-century building, the collections of this museum narrate the city’s history from early 19th century up to date, through a series of artefacts and documents from the Public Record Office.

Get in

By plane

The city is served by three airports, Melbourne Airport, which has international and domestic flights, and the smaller mostly domestic airports Essendon Airport and Avalon Airport.

Melbourne Airport

Melbourne Airport, also known as Tullamarine Airport, is 22 km north-west of the City Centre in the Hume region. There are regular flights from all major Australian and New Zealand cities. There are direct flights from many Asian hubs, with connections from Europe, and direct flights from North America, South America and Europe.

Cheap Flights from Melbourne

Destination Departure date Return date Find Ticket

Sydney

11.03.2021

16.03.2021

Tickets from 56

Hobart

16.03.2021

18.03.2021

Tickets from 74

Newcastle

01.12.2020

03.12.2020

Tickets from 74

Launceston

11.05.2021

16.05.2021

Tickets from 90

Adelaide

17.01.2021

30.01.2021

Tickets from 91

Gold Coast

17.03.2021

27.03.2021

Tickets from 101

Brisbane

08.02.2021

15.02.2021

Tickets from 130

Sunshine Coast

22.02.2021

01.03.2021

Tickets from 144

Cairns

25.02.2021

02.03.2021

Tickets from 162

Proserpine

01.02.2021

08.02.2021

Tickets from 186

Avalon Airport

Avalon Airport is a mainly domestic airport 55 km south-west of Melbourne in Lara, near Geelong. Although much further than Melbourne Airport, fares from Avalon are sometimes considerably cheaper. The terminals are generally very simple, with just an ATM, car hire desks and baggage carousels. Other facilities include a cafe, bar and a video arcade room. There are several flights in and out of Avalon each day, with many domestic operated by lower-cost airline Jetstar (which also flies to Melbourne Airport) and an AirAsiaX flight to Kuala Lumpur.

SkyBus operates a coach shuttle to Southern Cross Station in Melbourne’s City Centre via the outer western suburb of Werribee, meeting every flight arrival and departure. The transfer costs $22 one-way for an adult, and $10 for a child (4-14 years). Other than the coach, there is no public transport; Lara Station is 8 km from the terminal, meaning one could ride a bike on the road to/from the airport or catch a taxi, which would cost about $15 to the station. A taxi to the city from the airport could cost upwards of $100.

The driving time from Avalon Airport to Melbourne’s City Centre is about 45 minutes in good traffic conditions. Avalon Airport is also convenient for reaching nearby Geelong and the Great Ocean Road.

By train

Southern Cross Station is Melbourne’s regional rail hub for interstate and intrastate travel. It’s on the western side of the City Centre, with good public transport connections to the rest of the city.

By car

From Sydney, the quickest route to Melbourne is the Hume Highway, which takes 10 hours of driving without any stops. This road is almost all dual-carriageway (freeway). The Princes Highway (National Route 1) goes along the coast and is less crowded. It takes longer with lower speed limits, hills and bends, and few opportunities to overtake. See Sydney to Melbourne by car for more information.

Adelaide is slightly closer than Sydney and can be reached in 9 hours. The coastal route is scenic but slower.

A direct journey from Brisbane takes 21 hours of driving and takes you further inland along the Newell Highway. This makes for an alternative to the standard BrisbaneSydney-Melbourne coastal route.

By bus

Bus services to Melbourne from out of state are provided by Firefly Express and Greyhound.

Bus services within Victoria are operated by V/Line, and operate from most major and many minor Victorian towns.

By boat

The Spirit of Tasmania passenger/car ferry runs every night to Melbourne from Devonport, Tasmania. The 10½ hour journey departs at 7:30PM, arriving 6AM, with an extra day sailing during peak periods including summer.

Ticket prices depend on time of year and your sleeping accommodation. A seat (no bed) is the cheapest, starting (in off-peak season) from $108 for adults and $82 for children. The seat is most uncomfortable, equivalent to a cinema seat. Cabins with bunk beds start from $187 adults, $97 children. Peak season costs are about 25% higher. Cars cost $59 all year round.

Melbourne is also served by several international cruise ships throughout the year, particularly in the Summer cruise season.

All passenger ships serving Melbourne arrive at and depart from Station Pier in Port Melbourne, about 5 km from the city centre. Tram route 109 (towards Box Hill) departs frequently from the old railway station across the road from the Pier, travelling into the heart of Melbourne along Collins St. You can purchase mykis at the tram stop’s machine or from a visitor desk in the peak season.

Get around

Melbourne has a very large metropolitan area, but most sights of interest are within the city centre, and most of the rest can be reached within about 20 minutes on the train or tram. Melbourne’s city centre is laid out in an orderly grid system, similar to the grid system of Manhattan, meaning that navigating the city centre is easy.

By public transport

Melbourne has a fairly reliable public transportation system consisting of trams, trains and buses: trams and trains branch out from the city centre to the suburbs, while buses usually cover the rest. There are connections to all major attractions of the city, and it is fairly easy to get around without a car. Most of the network is wheelchair and pram accessible, with the major exception of the tram network, which mostly operates with older, step-entry vehicles. Train, tram and major bus services generally operate between 5AM and midnight Monday–Saturday and after 8AM Sunday. On Friday and Saturday nights, all-night train, tram and bus services run on a limited night network.

Public Transport Victoria coordinates public transport and provides timetables, maps, disruption info and a very useful journey planner. Mobile apps are available for iOS and Android devices; Google Maps also integrates train, tram and bus information.

Tickets

Myki is the reloadable smartcard used for all travel on trains, trams and buses. Myki cards can be purchased and reloaded from staffed railway stations, machines at stations, major tram stops and the airport, online, and various retail stores such as newsagencies and all 7-Eleven stores. You cannot purchase or reload them on trams, trains or buses.

Regular adult cards cost $6, and concession/under-16 cards cost $3. Concessions only apply to Australians with the appropriate concession card. The card comes with no preloaded credit and the fee is non-refundable. A myki Explorer pack ($15/7.50 adult child), which comes preloaded with $9/4.50 of credit (enough for a full day of travel) and a stack of attraction discount coupons, can be purchased at the Melbourne Visitor Centre, SkyBus terminals at the airport and Southern Cross Station, PTV Hubs and many accommodation providers.

To use myki, touch on by holding the card onto a reader before travel at the train station, or on board a bus/tram, and wait for the beep. Touch off when exiting a train station or a bus, although touching off on a tram is optional. Metropolitan Melbourne has two zones: Zone 1 which covers the entire city, and Zone 2 which allows a cheaper fare when travelling only in the outer suburbs. The fare (including the travel time and zone) is automatically calculated and deducted by myki, so there is no need to plan costs in advance. In the city centre, there is also a Free Tram Zone where one does not require a myki to travel and should not touch on if remaining within the zone.

Myki fares (as at 1 January 2019)
Adult Concession/Child
Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 1 Zone 2
2 hour $4.4 $3.0 $2.2 $1.5
Daily $8.8 $6.0 $4.4 $3.0

Regulations and laws surrounding public transport are strict. Ticket inspectors are common, and fines start at $207 (maybe more now) on the spot for offences such as fare evasion, putting feet on seats, swearing and drinking alcohol.

Trains

The train network is operated by Metro Trains Melbourne with blue branding. A partly-underground “City Loop” forms the basis of the network, with all the other lines branching off to the suburbs like the spokes of a wheel. The lines are named after the station at the end of the line, and all run through Flinders Street Station, the city’s famous suburban railway hub. Trains to the suburbs generally operate at 10-20 minute frequencies, with higher frequencies (but more overcrowding) in peak times. Be aware that some trains skip suburban stations when running express to and from the city; check information screens carefully to be sure.

Trams

Trams are a prominent feature in Melbourne’s urban landscape. The city has the largest network in the world. The network is operated by Yarra Trams with green branding. Most tram lines branch out from the city centre like spokes. In the city, they often become crowded, and you are unlikely to get a seat. The network is operated by a mix of newer, low-floor trams with stop announcements and older models with step-entry. Stops in the inner city generally have platforms, although most stops require hailing the tram from the side of the road; take care at these stops and look for distracted cars which may illegally speed past.

Yarra Trams’ official iOS and Android app, tramTRACKER, is very useful for tracking real-time tram arrivals and following the tram’s progress onboard. Most tram routes will have 8-12 minute service during the day, with higher frequencies in the peak, but lower frequencies of 20-30 minutes in the evenings.

Travel on all trams in the city centre is free. The boundary of the Free Tram Zone is marked with plenty of signage, but remember to touch on if you leave the FTZ. This is in addition to the City Circle, a free tourist tram in the city centre, which runs past many major sights in historical trams.

Buses

Buses serve as connections to places without rail transport, often connecting to major shopping centres and train stations. Denoted by orange branding and stops, most buses are low-floor and air-conditioned. A few major trunk routes (including ones such as the 200/207 in the inner north, the 900 to Chadstone, 907 to Doncaster, etc) operate at 10-15 minute frequencies, although for most buses, it is necessary to use the journey planner or check timetables, as service tends to be far less frequent than trains and trams.

Tourist services

As mentioned above, the free City Circle Tram (Route 35) runs around the CBD perimeter, operated by vintage-style maroon or green trams. Audio commentary provides information about attractions that are passed. These trams are geared to visitors and provide access to sites of interest to the tourist. More information is provided in the City Centre guide.

The Melbourne City Tourist Shuttle is another option that also extends to key tourism destinations just outside of the city centre, including the MCG, Lygon Street and the Royal Botanic Gardens. The buses run at 30-minute intervals between 9:30AM and 4:30PM daily. A complete circuit takes 90 minutes, with on-board commentary. It costs $10 for two consecutive days, allowing visitors to hop on and off as many times as they desire within that timeframe. Tickets may be purchased online, at the Melbourne Visitor Centre or with a credit card or coins at ticket machines at each stop.

By bike

The inner suburbs of Melbourne have a good network of bike paths by the standards of English-speaking countries, plus a generally flat terrain, making pedal-power a great way to take in the city. Most paths are “shared footways” under the law, although the majority of users in most places are cyclists. This means cyclists should expect to share the path with pedestrians, dog-walkers, rollerbladers, joggers, prams and tricycles. Some trails contain on-road sections (in marked bike lanes). It is legal to cycle on footpaths only when supervising cycling children or when the path is marked or signposted as allowing bikes. Helmets are required by law, as are lights when riding at night.

Take an up-close look at local animal species

Melbourne Zoo houses a great variety of domestic and international animal species. Visit the Australian Outback exhibit to interact with laid-back koalas and joyful kangaroos, or head to Great Flight Aviary to walk through artificial Australian rainforests and wetlands. The rest of the zoo presents all kinds of international animal species, from African lions to Asian red pandas.

Shop until you drop

Queen Victoria Market is one the city’s best markets, as well as a popular landmark. Dating back to 19th century, it has been a shopping hotspot for Melbournians since then. Hundreds of shops and stalls sell everything from exotic fruit to authentic local crafts to hip clothing. For a typical western shopping centre experience, visit Melbourne Central. More than 300 retail shops are surrounded by cosy cafes and charming eateries, while entertainment facilities, such as cinema theatres and lively bars, are also available. Camberwell Sunday Market and Lost and Found Market are the city’s top places for vintage and curious items.

Art scout in Melbourne

National Gallery of Victoria holds the city’s greatest art collection. The National Gallery is housed into two different buildings: the first is located in Southbank and houses exhibitions of international art, while the second focuses on local art and is situated near Federation Square. In the Australian section the visitors can admire aboriginal artefacts, local artworks from colonial times and modern Australian art.

The International section, on the other hand, houses masterpieces from top international artists of all times, such as El Greco, Picasso and Rothko. A fascinating collection of ancient artefacts is also available, including items from the Egyptian, Greek, Asian and Pacific civilizations. Both sections are free to enter, but fees may apply to special temporary exhibitions.

Contemporary art enthusiasts should definitely pay a visit to Australian Centre of Contemporary Art and Centre of Contemporary Photography. None of the two features a permanent collection, but great works of both local and international artists are presented in temporary exhibitions throughout the year.

Stay safe in Melbourne

Melbourne is generally a very safe city for its size, although some parts of Melbourne are best avoided at night; these include parts of the western suburbs around Footscray and Sunshine, some northern suburbs such as Broadmeadows and southern suburbs like Frankston and Dandenong. The city centre, particularly the area around the nightclub and strip club district of King Street, can be a hotspot for alcohol-fuelled violence late at night. However, you are more likely to be heckled by drunken revellers and street walkers than you are to be actually threatened or randomly attacked. Demonstrating normal safety precautions and staying to well-lit streets is a good way to avoid trouble.

Protective Services Officers (PSOs) patrol Melbourne’s railway stations from 6PM to the last train, with all stations possessing a ‘safety zone’ with increased lighting, CCTV cameras and easy access to the red emergency button. Trains also contain buttons in the case of an emergency, while it’s a good idea to sit close to the driver while on a train, tram or bus late at night. The public transport network is generally safe, although drug or alcohol affected travellers occasionally give other commuters grief.

If driving a car, beware of car theft or break-in. Keep valuables out of sight when parked, always lock the car and leave the windows up before you leave. If you are waiting in your car, lock the car as well. A police officer will always show ID before asking you to open your door or window.

Pickpocketing is rare in Melbourne, but be aware of your belongings in and around Flinders Street Station and the crowded block between Flinders and Collins Streets on Swanston Street. Beggars frequent the southern ends of Elizabeth and Swanston Streets, although are unlikely to give you trouble.

Although scams are rare in Melbourne, some real estate agents attempt to prey on foreigners by deducting costs for non-existent reparations and cleaning from the bond. The Tenants Union of Victoria can help with these issues when moving in and out.

It is important to take care around tram lines. Trams are heavy and it can take over 100 metres for a tram to safely stop. Even if a tram has passed, look carefully both ways, as trams will often run nose-to-tail on busy corridors like Swanston Street. If driving, it is illegal to U-turn across tram tracks or pass a tram while the doors are open and passengers are disembarking.

Where to stay during the lockdown in Melbourne

Hotels Melbourne: Popularity

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

Sofitel Melbourne On Collins

★★★★★

-29%

306218

View Isaan Hotel Deals

The Victoria Hotel

★★★

-18%

7460

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Brady Hotels Central Melbourne

★★★★

-20%

8668

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Atlantis Hotel Melbourne

★★★★

-47%

9651

View Isaan Hotel Deals

The Langham Melbourne

★★★★★

-9%

181164

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Citadines on Bourke Melbourne

★★★★

-45%

17396

View Isaan Hotel Deals

ibis Melbourne Central

★★★

-47%

13370

View Isaan Hotel Deals

QT Melbourne

★★★★★

-18%

169139

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Go next

Melbourne is fairly centrally located on the coast of Victoria, and there are many natural and man-made attractions that make for a nice day trip. Another way to visit regional Victoria is utilising the VicLink public transport system. Regular train journeys leave from Southern Cross station. Regional attractions include:

Melbourne outskirts

These places are within an hour’s drive of central Melbourne.

  • Werribee — historic mansion and open-range zoo
  • Dandenong Ranges — national park, gardens, historic steam railway
  • Wine-tasting in the Yarra Valley, Healesville and the Healesville Sanctuary
  • Port Phillip Bay scenic drive and the Mornington Peninsula — the seaside resort locations of Sorrento and Portsea, offering both bayside and surf beaches
  • Warburton and Mount Donna Buang — winter sightseeing snow

Northern Victoria

  • Echuca-Moama.
  • Mount Buller — skiing and sightseeing.

Eastern Victoria

  • Mornington Peninsula.
  • Phillip Island.

Western Victoria

  • The Victorian Goldfields — Bendigo, Ballarat, Castlemaine, Maldon.
  • Grampians National Park.
  • South West Coast — Geelong, Bellarine Peninsula, and the Great Ocean Road, with its many scenic vistas.

Tasmania

From Port Melbourne, take the Spirit Of Tasmania to Devonport, the gateway to Tasmania. Crossings take approximately 12 hours.

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Australia

Brisbane Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

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Australia’s third most populous city after Sydney and Melbourne, Brisbane is the capital of Queensland. Initially inhabited by the indigenous tribes of Jagera and Turrbal, the first European settlement was established in Brisbane during 19th century.

Since then the city has grown into a dynamic metropolis with modern architecture, large zones of greenery, fascinating museums and lively nightlife. The locals are considered to be some of the country’s most friendly and laid-back residents.

Large enough to be cosmopolitan yet small enough to be friendly and accessible, Brisbane is a ‘garden metropolis’ famous for its leafy, open spaces and the pleasant pace of life that unfolds between the zig-zags of its iconic river. Gaining international exposure during the 1982 Commonwealth Games, the 1988 World Expo, the 2001 Goodwill Games and the 2014 G20 Summit, Brisbane’s year-round warm climate, spectacular scenery, pleasant locals and world-class facilities have been the draw-cards for many domestic and international visitors, making Brisbane the fastest-growing city in Australia. Despite this rapid development, it maintains a youthful enthusiasm and is arguably one of the most laid-back and forward-thinking of any Australian capital city.

History of Brisbane

For many thousands of years prior to European settlement, the Brisbane area was inhabited by the Turrbal and Jagera Aboriginal people. They knew the area that is now the central business district as Mian-jin, meaning “place shaped as a spike”. The Australian English phrase “hard yakka” – meaning “hard work” – comes from the Jagera people, and is certainly what the European settlers faced in Brisbane’s humid sub-tropical climate.

The Moreton Bay area was explored by English navigator Matthew Flinders. On 17 July 1799, Flinders landed at what is now known as Woody Point which he named “Red Cliff Point” – now Redcliffe after the red-coloured cliffs visible from the bay. In 1823 Governor of New South Wales Sir Thomas Brisbane instructed that a new northern penal settlement be developed, intended to house dangerous prisoners in a remote location and an exploration party led by John Oxley further explored Moreton Bay. The original penal settlement was established in Redcliffe but was later moved to a location further down the bay where freshwater supplies were more reliable. Oxley named this new settlement “Brisbane” in honour of the Governor.

A series of major immigration events took place in the following decades which brought with it strong industry and commercial development in the region. In 1838, non-convict free settlers moved to the area and pushed to close the jail and to release the land in the area. In 1859, a gold rush led to the establishment of the colony of Queensland with Brisbane as its capital even though Brisbane was not incorporated as a city until 1902. In 1925, the Queensland State Parliament created the City of Brisbane Act that set up a single government for the city of Brisbane, still the largest metropolitan authority in Australia and one of the largest in the world by area. Over twenty small municipalities and shires were amalgamated to form the City of Brisbane. 1930 was a significant year for Brisbane with the completion of Brisbane City Hall, then the city’s tallest building and the Shrine of Remembrance in ANZAC Square which has since become Brisbane’s main war memorial. These historic buildings along with the Story Bridge which opened in 1940 are key landmarks that help define the architectural character of the city.

During World War II, Brisbane became central to the Allied campaign when the AMP Building – now MacArthur Central was used as the South West Pacific headquarters for General Douglas MacArthur, chief of the Allied Pacific forces. In 1942, Brisbane was the site of a violent clash between visiting US military personnel, Australian servicemen and civilians which resulted in one death and several injuries. This incident became known colloquially as the Battle of Brisbane.

Postwar Brisbane had developed a “big country town” stigma, an image the city’s politicians and marketers were very keen to remove but despite steady growth, Brisbane’s development was punctuated by infrastructure problems. The State Government began a major program of change and urban renewal beginning with the central business district and inner suburbs. Trams in Brisbane were a popular mode of public transport until the network was closed in 1969 leaving Melbourne as the last Australian city to operate a tram network.

The 1974 Brisbane flood was a major disaster which temporarily crippled the city. During this era, Brisbane grew and modernised rapidly becoming a destination of interstate migration. Some of Brisbane’s popular landmarks were lost sometimes demolished in controversial circumstances with much media coverage and public protest. Major public works included the Riverside Expressway, the Gateway Bridge and later the redevelopment of South Bank after the city hosted World Expo ’88 starting with the Queensland Art Gallery and Performing Arts Centre.

In subsequent years there has been strong immigration into Brisbane and the surrounding region, both domestically and internationally with large influxes from Asia, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Polynesia. This was driven by cheaper house prices than in other Australian cities, a pleasant climate and good employment opportunities, especially within the mining and tourism sectors. Brisbane’s population growth has exceeded the national average every year since 1990 at an average rate of around 2.2% per year.

Since 2000, Brisbane has gone from drought to flooding rains. In the mid-2000s, lower dam levels led to severe water restrictions for residents. The campaign to lower water usage was so successful that the city now boasts some of the lowest average water use per resident of any developed city in the world. These days you’re not likely to find the tap dry or see any visible signs of the shortage. However out of respect for the locals, keep your showers relatively brief, try your best to conserve water and expect the locals to be horrified if you walk away from a running tap.

A number of extremely wet summers broke the drought and culminated in the January 2011 flood which devastated the city. In typical Queensland fashion, one of the largest volunteer workforces ever amassed – over 100,000 Brisbane locals and Queensland volunteers descended on the city to aid in the clean-up, earning the nickname the “Mud Army” and allowing the city to return to business just a week after the flood. The Mud Army were honoured with the naming of a new CityCat Ferry, the “Spirit of Brisbane” and then Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard described Brisbane residents as “the best of humankind”, gifting a monument to the city to honour the volunteers.

Climate

When the wet season hits the northern Australian tropics, Brisbane experiences hot and clear summer days with stunning afternoon thunderstorms. When winter arrives towards the southern capital cities, temperatures are sent into the low teens (°C), while Brisbane’s climate stays mostly dry and sunny, with daytime temperatures usually remaining above 20°C, comparable to that of Miami.

  • Summer (December–February) humidity is high and daytime temperatures frequently exceed 30°C, with night temperatures rarely dropping below 20°C. Occasional heat waves can raise the temperature in excess of 40°C, however these are not common. Just about any outdoor activity you do at the height of a regular summer day in Brisbane will leave you bathed in sweat. Loose-fitting clothing that protects you from the sun is appropriate attire for most casual activities, and air-conditioning will assure you a comfortable night’s sleep or ride on public transport. Summer storms with hail and heavy rainfall are common in afternoons on hot, humid days. They usually pass quickly and often put on a good lightning show.
  • Autumn (March–May) sees a cool change in Brisbane with average daytime temperatures between 20 and 30°C. Most tourists not used to a humid climate will find this the best time to visit Brisbane, as the humidity lowers and the region shifts into a more comfortable, dry and sunny weather pattern, perfect for outdoor activities. Night-time temperatures usually drop to 10-20°C, with ambient heat from the day still radiating from the ground, keeping the early evening still warm and comfortable, though a light jacket may be required later at night.
  • Winter (June–August) signals the region’s dry season, with Brisbane experiencing cool, sunny, cloudless days. Temperatures typically go up to 25°C during the day with night-time temperatures rarely dropping below 5°C. The early-morning chill usually disappears by mid-morning and most of the daylight hours are relatively warm, however it is still recommended to have something warm to wear as this is not always the case. The eastern suburbs tend to be cooler as sea breezes blow in from the bay.
  • Spring (September–November) sees the revitalisation of the city with warmer days and fresh sea breezes coming in from the bay. Weather is similar to Autumn months, with increasing humidity as summer draws closer.

Warning

The damaging effects of the Queensland sun should not be underestimated. The state has the highest per-capita rate of skin cancer in the world and tourists often come unprepared. On a sunny day in Brisbane, it is common to be sunburnt after as few as 15 minutes under the midday sun, but sunburn can also occur on overcast days. This is not exclusive to summer, but can happen all year round, even in winter.

If you are planning a long day outdoors, always cover up with sunscreen, loose clothing, a hat and sunglasses to protect yourself. Limit your outdoor physical activity in the summer until you are used to the heat. Immediately seek shade or an air-conditioned area and drink plenty of water if you are feeling the effects of heat exhaustion, including headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, confusion or fainting.

Get in

Fly to Brisbane

Cheap Flights from Brisbane

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Brisbane can be accessed by plane via the main Brisbane Airport, or by the less convenient but often cheaper Gold Coast Airport.

Brisbane Airport has direct flights from all Australian capitals and many Queensland centres. Major domestic carriers include Virgin Australia, Jetstar, and Qantas. The airport is serviced by many regional airlines and it is possible to fly daily to most Asian centres (and on to Europe), the United States and New Zealand, without flying via Sydney or Melbourne.

You can get a bus and train from the Gold Coast Airport to Brisbane, by using the Surfside buses to Robina and transferring to the train. A single fare costs around $17, and you can buy a single ticket or use a Go Card.

Both airports have a full range of rental car options.

Travel by train to Brisbane

Long distance rail services both arrive and depart from Roma Street Station in the inner city. Services to New South Wales operated by NSW TrainLink depart from Platform 2 and all other Long Distance Services depart from Platform 10.

  • NSW Trainlink operates a daily return rail service from Sydney, with onward connections to Melbourne and Canberra.
  • Queensland Rail has services to most centres in Queensland

Travel to Brisbane by car

Visitors from southern states can reach Brisbane by either the New England and Cunningham or Pacific Highways.

  • The Bruce Highway (A1) connects the northern coast of Queensland to Brisbane.
  • The Pacific Motorway (M1) connects Brisbane to the Gold Coast continues south along the New South Wales coast.
  • The Ipswich Motorway (M2) connects to Ipswich and surrounding Western Brisbane areas.
  • The Warrego Highway (A2) links Brisbane to the west through the Lockyer Valley, Toowoomba and the Darling Downs.
  • The Cunningham Highway (A15) links Brisbane to Southern Queensland and Central western New South Wales.

Travel by bus to Brisbane

Most long distance bus services operate from level 3 of the Brisbane Transit Centre near Roma Street Station in the inner city.

  • Premier Motor Service offers services between Sydney and Brisbane and Brisbane and Cairns.
  • Greyhound Australia link other interstate capitals to Brisbane via their extensive national network. In particular they operate regular services between Brisbane and Sydney, Brisbane and Toowoomba then onward to Roma and between Brisbane and Cairns. Pick-up is available from the Brisbane Airport on some services.
  • Murrays Coaches operate services between Brisbane and Toowoomba and onwards to the small town of Miles, west of Toowoomba. Pick up is available from the Brisbane Airport on some services.
  • Bus Queensland operate services under Government contract between Brisbane and many rural and remote areas. Key routes serviced by this company include services between Brisbane and Charleville via Toowoomba and between Brisbane and Mt Isa.

Getting around

Brisbane features an excellent public transport network, which includes train, bus and ferry routes. Tickets of all means of transport are zone oriented, but most of the city’s attractions are located within the first zone, which includes the city centre and nearby suburbs.

If you plan to take more than one rides per day, it is worth purchasing a daily ticket, which comes with the same price of two single tickets and allows unlimited travel for the whole day. Children pay a half reduced ticket.

Getting anywhere in Brisbane is reasonably easy. The CBD (Central Business District) is relatively flat and condensed, which makes it perfect for walking or cycling and virtually all other areas can be reached by public transport.

However, some areas can be difficult to navigate through a combination of dead ends, winding roads and steep slopes. This applies to some inner-city suburbs, but especially outer suburbs. If you find yourself lost, it’s advisable to head to the nearest main road as more than likely it will be serviced by buses or trains. If you are driving, a street directory or GPS unit is an essential addition to your car. Locals are generally friendly and more than willing to help you out if you are lost, so don’t be afraid to ask.

By foot

Brisbane is an excellent city for walking and you should have no problems getting around the CBD. Within minutes of walking in virtually any direction you will be able to find a bus, train or ferry station. Maps can be purchased from bookstores such as QBD (Queensland Books Depot), Dymocks, any tourist information centre or viewed online. There are also a number of shared pathways that offer relaxed walking/jogging routes away from roads and traffic. Detailed maps and a route planner are available.

Beyond the CBD and inner-suburbs however, sights can become very spread out, so you might want to consider other modes of getting around.

Travel by bicycle in Brisbane

Getting around the town and Southbank is easy thanks to the many cycle paths along the river.

The Brisbane City Council operates a scheme known as CityCycle, which offers bicycles for hire at different CityCycle stations located around the town, however, you must be at least 17 years old to join. Anyone (including visitors) can register for a 24-hour period for $2 which provides access to the entire CityCycle network, an unlimited number of journeys and the first half hour of every journey is free. You can register online at link your GoCard, or tap your credit card at a CityCycle station. [1]. Once you pay the daily or monthly fee, the bikes are free to use, as long as you return the bike to any CityCycle station within 30 minutes. Costs increase steeply after the 30 minutes, and there is no leeway given by the stations. Helmets are mandatory as required by law (and this is enforced with on-the-spot fines), but some free yellow helmets can be unreliably found at the bike-hire stations. Download the AllBikes app to check the location of hire points with bike and return capacity.

Cycling on footpaths is legal in the Brisbane City Council area (maximum speed 10 km/h), however pedestrians have right of way. Keep left and take special care when riding through South Bank Parklands as the shared (and quite wide) foot and cycle path is often clogged with large groups taking up the whole path, pedestrians stopping unexpectedly for photos and playing children running heedlessly in front of you. It is often too noisy here to use your bell, so use your common sense, and dismount and push your bike through crowded pedestrian areas.

Maps showing extensive dedicated bikeways and shared paths in the Brisbane City Council area are available on the BCC website [2] and a journey planner is available here or using Google maps with the bicycle mode selected. These bikeways offer a pleasant way to explore and enjoy Brisbane.

Some areas of Brisbane are very hilly. If your street map shows a tangle of winding streets close together that is a sign of steep roads. A short trip can quickly become a lot of work, especially if you are using the heavy CityCycle bikes. Stick to the river when possible, it’s where you get the best views and it is almost entirely flat. Also, the a nearby CityCycle station is little use for returning your bike when you are at the top of the cliff, and it is at the bottom.

If you leave the cycle paths, footpaths, and minor streets you should be prepared to contend with busy urban traffic. Feel free to ignore any Brisbane motorists that may have resentment toward cyclists and ignorance of the road rules applying to cyclists; cyclists are permitted to travel on just about all roads in Brisbane. Special “bicycle lanes” on Brisbane’s roads are becoming increasingly common and are often denoted by a narrow green-coloured strip of road adjacent to the curb.

Green Cabs

Green Cabs are one of the latest additions to the city and growing in popularity. Essentially a rickshaw, they are a novel way of getting around the inner-city areas. Able to accommodate up to 2 adults and 2 small children (though it can vary – talk to the rider and see what you can arrange), they mostly operate between West End, South Bank, the CBD, Fortitude Valley and along the river where it’s mostly flat, although you can arrange to be taken elsewhere. Prices start from $5 and tours are available.

Green Cabs operate on weekends and during special events. During the day operators who are ready to go are usually based at South Bank at the Wheel of Brisbane. At night, you will find Green Cabs at South Bank and throughout the CBD.

Travel to Brisbane by car

Many of the roads in Brisbane Central Business District (CBD) are one-way, making driving in this area complicated for people not familiar with the layout. Drivers used to city driving should not find Brisbane too much of a challenge, and parking is readily available in parking stations in the city, albeit often at a steep cost, around $40 to casually park for a day. $15 parking is generally available with early-bird deals (arrive before 9:00, leave after 16:00.) Brisbane’s Central Business District (CBD) has limited street parking for your car and issues parking infringements for illegally parked vehicles. All inner-city street parking is metered and signed and costs about $4 per hour. Avoid parking fines by only parking in designated parking bays marked by white lines. A yellow painted line along the kerbside indicates no standing and no parking.

Most CBD roads become clearways at 16:00 (unless signed otherwise), and any cars parked on the side of the road will be fined, towed or both. You have to pay for the towing to get your car back, and then expect a fine to follow in the mail. Check for signs and line marking when parking, or just play it safe and find a parking station.

If you are looking to visit the areas surrounding the city, then generally a car will be as quick as any other way of getting around, with the possible exception of the height of peak hour. Brisbane is notorious for having roads that bottle-neck and what would normally be a 15 minute trip could easily turn into well over an hour during peak times.

There are several toll roads in and around Brisbane (clearly signed and marked for approaching motorists), including the Gateway Bridge which crosses the river near the airport, the Clem-7 tunnel as well as the Go-Between Bridge. Cash is not accepted, toll users must have a prepaid transponder or post-pay via a website. Check the go-via website for more details. [3]

By motorcycle, motorbike or scooter

With limited street parking, and often-expensive off-street parking, the best way to get around the CBD is either by scooter or motorbike. Motorbike and scooter parking is free and there are plenty of areas designated for parking of both motorbikes and scooters.

Scooters, however, are not allowed on major highways. Even though they can be ridden by just about anyone who holds a car driver’s licence, it is difficult to see all of Brisbane on a scooter as most major streets are zoned as 60–80 km/hr and the standard 50cc scooters are limited to 55 km/hr.

North of Brisbane you will find many beautiful scenic drives for motorbike enthusiasts. The North side is surrounded by many windy roads and great mountain roads on which any motorbike rider can enjoy a full day out on the motorbike of just about any size.

There are services available throughout Brisbane and the Gold Coast which deliver both scooters and motorbikes right to your door-step. Some will even provide all the necessary gear as well. Take a look at a few rental companies below to find a perfect motorbike/scooter for your trip.

Rentals

Most major car hire companies have offices at Brisbane Airport and in the city centre. As is common with many hire car companies, you will often pay a premium to pick up or return at the airport location. If you are looking to cover a long distance by car, ensure your rental policy includes unlimited mileage – most economy to standard sized car rental include this already. Most car rental companies hire to people 25 years of age and over, some all age car rental companies do hire to younger drivers over 18 years of age (there are extra charges involved for under-age drivers).

By taxi

Taxis are numerous throughout Brisbane and can take you anywhere. The major companies are Yellow Cabs and Black & White Cabs. All cabs can be hailed down no matter where you are, provided their roof light is on, though in some areas they might not be able to stop, so it might be best to book one in advance. All cabs accept cash, credit and debit cards. Despite cabs being fitted with GPS units, you’ll find it wise to check with the driver about your destination before departing and make sure they are willing to go there.

In the outer-suburban areas, cabs will pull over if you hail them down from the side of the road and can be found in designated taxi ranks in shopping centres, or near bars and pubs. The same can be said for the inner-city, however taxi ranks are more common and it’s usually best to catch a cab from there. At night though, especially on Friday and Saturday, taxis exclusively pick up passengers from these ranks and you’d be extremely lucky if you get one elsewhere. These ranks are usually monitored by security and have ushers at night. From midnight-5:30AM on Friday and Saturday nights, all taxis from the CBD and Fortitude Valley become “FlatFare”, meaning that there is a fixed price for any given destination and you will have to pay before entering the taxi.

Taxis can be expensive in Brisbane; a trip between the airport and the city can be in excess of $50–60 and can easily run to over $100 if you go beyond the metropolitan Brisbane region.

Public transportation in Brisbane

Brisbane is well serviced by public transport, with a large network of buses, trains and ferries. These are all integrated with the city’s Go Card smartcard ticketing system.

Brisbane’s three main public transport options (ferries, buses and trains) are run by a single provider, known as TransLink. This allows free transfers to be made between the three different transport modes, providing relevant time and zone restrictions are met. The TransLink website (Phone: 13 12 30 or download the ‘MyTranslink’ app) is handy for researching public transport options between destinations. Google Maps also offers full public transport navigation, with real-time updated information across all three modes.

Ticketing

TransLink has integrated ticketing called the go card, a contactless smart card purchased before travelling that you top-up with funds. The fare is deducted as you touch-on and touch-off as you board and leave public transport. You must touch both on and off for all Go-card journeys regardless of the mode of transport. A failure to touch off will result in a fixed fare of up to $30 being charged to the card. Buses and CityCats/Ferries are fitted with go card machines as you board. Train stations have fare gates or distinctive yellow readers located on the platform. A deposit of $10 applies when purchasing a go card. Go cards can be purchased and topped up from staff at train stations, ticket vending machines at major stations and bus stops, and selected newsagents and convenience stores, which there are many of in the city centre.

Buying a go card removes the hassle of figuring out zones. Fares are discounted by 30% and once you have paid for 8 journeys within a week (Monday to Sunday). Translink uses the word “journey” to mean end-to-end journey including any required transfers, and the word “trip” to mean a single point-to-point trip. A journey can be made up of one or more trips. When making a number of trips to get to your destination it is still one journey if you touch on within 60 minutes of touching off on your previous trip.

You can buy paper single tickets for journeys to travel all the zones you need to travel in. Operators generally know what zones to give you if you tell them your destination. They are only valid for one way journeys, and come at a premium – starting at over $4 for a one way trip. A few services (like the City Glider, and some peak hour services on the busways) are pre-paid only, and you must have a Go-card to ride.

Getting a go-card will save you at least 30% over paper tickets for equivalent journeys. However, getting a refund for the unused money and $10 deposit can be a hassle. If you have paid by credit card you need apply and have the money returned by cheque or by transfer to an Australian bank account. If you have paid by cash you can get a refund at a train station, including the airport train station.

If you are going to be doing short-term extensive travel or using the Airtrain, you can buy a 3-day or 5-day unlimited travel SEEQ Card for $79 and $129 respectively. SEEQ cards work like regular go cards however provide additional discounts at various tourism attractions around South-East Queensland. You don’t have to worry about topping up and refunds, but you’ll struggle to get value out of it unless you are catching the Airtrain.

You can be fined $261 for travelling without a valid ticket.

Fares

If you are using a Go Card, then all fares are calculated automatically based on where you touch-on and touch-off.

The fare depends on public transport “zones”. The 8 zones form concentric rings and propagate outwards from the CBD (zone 1) and cover the whole of South East Queensland. All official public transport maps clearly mark the zones and zone boundaries. Most of Brisbane is covered by zones 1 and 2. Your fare is determined by how many zones you travel through. Travelling between zones 2 and 3 will cost you the same fare as travelling between zones 7 and 8. In addition if you are using a paper ticket, you must observe the time restrictions for transfers to avoid having to pay for another journey.

Often, major stops like shopping centres and busway stops are used as zone boundaries. Stops that form part of the zone boundary are considered part of both zones.

CityFerry and CityCat

CityFerries and CityCats have become an icon of the city and are fantastic ways to tour Brisbane along the river. The CityCats are high-speed catamarans with stops at South Bank and the city centre as well as many riverside suburbs, and are a very popular method of getting around for tourists. CityFerries are more traditional ferries which generally operate shorter routes with more frequent stops; you may end up on one if you must use one of the smaller terminals, but in practice, most riverside destinations are accessible from the faster and more modern CityCats.

Cross-river ferries, such as the Bulimba to Teneriffe Cross River Ferry link the transport facilities on the opposite sides of the river.

Trains

Trains in greater Brisbane run along radial lines. Most train services in Brisbane are through-running, travelling from one end of the suburbs to the other, however all trains service Roma Street, Central, Fortitude Valley and Bowen Hills regardless of their ultimate destination. Interurban services can also be caught to the Gold Coast (using connecting tram services at Helensvale and buses at several other stops) and Sunshine Coast (using connecting bus services at Landsborough and Nambour) as well as Australia Zoo (connecting bus at Beerwah). Trains generally run from 6AM to midnight, though there are some variations such as running later on Friday and Saturday nights, and finishing earlier on Sundays.

Buses

Brisbane has a large network of bus routes. Virtually all buses have a digital display of their route number and destinations. The inner city areas are very well served by buses, with the most popular routes running from 6AM to 11PM as a minimum, and most routes ultimately terminating at Queen St Bus Station, Fortitude Valley (via Adelaide St or Elizabeth St) or on the busway. In some of Brisbane’s notoriously dispersed outer suburbs, services may be much less frequent or have reduced running hours, so it is advisable to check timetables if making these trips. Due to Brisbane traffic, buses are occasionally up to 10 minutes late during peak hour.

Brisbane’s dedicated busway runs from a corridor in the southern or northern suburbs, through South Bank and the central business district. Due to the large number of buses in the central business district, a number of other routes use stops scattered across the city streets, so if you are unfamiliar with the geography of Brisbane, use of the busway is recommended where possible. The busway and train network meet at Roma Street station, and the two combined provide very good coverage of the key inner city areas.

Drivers do carry notes with them, but not always many or of high value. If you must pay cash, try to pay the correct amount and with coins where possible. Some services, especially in peak hour, do not sell tickets on board at all and only accept pre-purchased tickets or go cards. These are signed with the letter ‘P’ before the route number. As with many cities, Brisbane has a large number of express buses, so it should not be assumed that all buses observe every stop along the roads they travel. In peak hour there are even more express routes (“rockets” and “bullets”) for commuters which make very few stops at all. Ask the driver if you are unsure.

Brisbane also has all-night bus services on Friday and Saturday nights on selected routes; this is branded ‘NightLink’.

Worthy routes

  • The ‘Brisbane City Loop’ is a free and convenient bus service travelling in both directions around the CBD. Operating Monday to Friday 7AM-5:50PM every 10 minutes from any distinctive bright red CBD bus stop.
  • The ‘Spring Hill Loop’ free bus operates around the Spring Hill area just north of the CBD and is an easy way to avoid walking the steep hills in the area. This bus service runs Monday to Friday approximately every 30 minutes between 6:50AM and 8:25AM then every 10 minutes until 6:05PM
  • The ‘CityGlider’ bus operates as a prepaid service for quick north-south cross-city travel between West End and the Teneriffe Ferry at Newstead, stopping at any distinctive light blue bus stop. It runs every 5 minutes during peak hour (weekdays from 7-9AM and 4-6PM), and every 10 to 15 minutes between all other hours of operation. It operates Su-Th 5:30AM-11:30PM, and F-Sa 24 hours.
  • The ‘Maroon Glider’ bus operates as a prepaid service for quick east-west cross-city travel between Woolloongabba and Ashgrove, stopping at distinctive maroon (dark red) bus stops. The service operates M-Su 5:30AM-11:30PM every 10 minutes in peak periods (weekdays from 7-9AM and 4-6PM) and every 15 minutes in off-peak periods. Services will also operate throughout Friday and Saturday nights (excluding public holidays unless otherwise advertised) at 30 minute intervals midnight-5AM.
  • Routes ‘599’ and ‘598 form the Great Circle Line which circles the city in clockwise and counter-clockwise direction, respectively. They are a great way of exploring the outer suburbs and stop at some of Brisbane’s premier shopping centres.

The top-5 things to see and do in Brisbane

Visit Queensland Cultural Centre
Located on South Bank, Queensland Cultural Centre is a fascinating complex, which houses three of the city’s museums, concert halls, conference facilities and the state library.

Queensland Museum is the most visited out of the complex’s attractions. The museum focuses on Queensland’s history, from prehistoric age to modern times. Among the most popular exhibits you will find the skeleton of a domestic dinosaur and the airplane which first completed the route from England to Australia.

Queensland Art Gallery hosts some interesting collections of both European and Australian artists. Undeniably more interesting than Queensland Art Gallery is the nearby Gallery of Modern Art, which is also a part of Queensland Cultural Centre. Works by Australian artists are on display, including paintings, sculptures, photography, video art and contemporary installations.

Spend a day at one of the city’s outstanding parklands
Brisbane offers several large parklands, where locals come to relax, jog, play or have a bite among lush greenery. Located by the river, South Bank Parkland is a great place to spend the day, especially if you are travelling kids. Take a refreshing waterside walk or dip in the artificial lake, which also features its own artificial beach!

Roma Street Parkland, on the other hand, is the largest subtropical garden around the globe, presenting coffee plantations, colourful flower gardens and beautifully arranged stone gardens. Bring your own supplies and take advantage of the public barbeques to enjoy a lovely pick-nick.

Take an up-close look at lazy koalas at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
Situated a few kilometres away from the city centre of Brisbane, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is home to more than 130 cute koalas, which makes it the largest koala sanctuary in the world. Apart from the lovely lazy bears, you also have a chance to interact with other Australian animals, such as kangaroos, Tasmanian devils and dingoes.

Climb up Story Bridge
Australia’s longest cantilever bridge, Story Bridge also offers another unique feature. It is one of the three bridges worldwide (two in Australia and one in New Zealand), where climbing is allowed.

Of course you can only do that as part of an organised tour, but it is still a very extraordinary experience. The fee to join is not cheap, but you can enjoy the best river and city views from the top of the bridge.

Take a cruise down Brisbane River
One of the most popular tourist attractions, Brisbane river cruising is a nice way to meet with the city and enjoy some lovely views.

Several different companies organise such tours, some them also offering combined tickets which also include other activities, such as riding the riverside Ferris wheel.

Stay safe in Brisbane

Crime

Brisbane has a relatively low crime rate in comparison to other cities of such size. In most cases being aware of your environment and using common sense will keep you safe. Like Sydney and other large cities, trains and train stations are usually considered a common crime zone throughout the afternoons and nights, however trains and stations are patrolled by Police, Transit Officers, railway personnel and private security guards. Cameras are also used to increase security. It is advised to exercise caution when travelling on trains and buses during these periods of the day.

Here are some particular areas of note:

  • Outer Suburbs: Tend to have a higher crime rate than inner suburbs which should be taken into account when visiting these areas.
    • Days: Very safe during the day, but using common sense goes a long way. Avoid gangs of people, especially if they seem trashy or obnoxious and be mindful if a questionable person approaches you.
    • Nights: Like most other places, outer suburbs to get more dangerous. Most suburban streets are poorly lit or have no lighting at all. It is recommended that individuals walking in these areas at night take precaution or venture within a group.
  • City Central/CBD: Usually very safe at all hours.
    • Days: Very safe during the day thanks to a good police presence and most people only being there for work. Though during school holidays groups of youths can congregate, especially around Queen St and South Bank and can get rather rowdy, but they usually mind their own business.
    • Nights: Still relatively safe at night. Police presence isn’t as strong, except on Friday and Saturday nights, but you’re still urged to travel with others. Be careful if catching a train at night, even though the train stations and trains are well patrolled and watched by CCTV. Treasury Casino patrons often gather outside and unwanted attention can be received late at night due to drunks. However, security is tight and the entire area around the Casino is monitored by CCTV. Take extra caution if in South Bank at night due to groups of youths congregating there.
  • Fortitude Valley: Police presence very strong here due to the concentration of bars.
    • Days: Just as safe as the CBD during the day.
    • Nights (especially Friday and Saturday): Taxi ranks in particular can be a little dangerous due to many frustrated drunks having to wait for cabs. Wait only at ranks that have a security guard. Stay to the well-lit busy streets and never venture off alone, especially down back-streets or far away from a crowd. Especially for females, it is recommended to travel in pairs or groups to avoid any unwanted attention from drunken revellers, especially in the early hours of the morning.
  • Suburban pubs: generally less safe than inner-city pubs, bars and clubs due to less police and security. Drunks can be a hassle when in the vicinity of suburban pubs, especially around closing times. Fights in these venues are common.

Emergency numbers

Throughout Australia, the number for emergency services (Police, Fire and Ambulance) is 000. When using a mobile or cell phone, the numbers 000 and 112 are free of charge, and connect using any of the available networks.

Emergency numbers such as 911 and 999 do not work within Australia.

Sun safety

Probably the worst thing that can befall your trip to Brisbane is sunburn and other heat-related issues. The local UV Index is almost always in the extreme rating during the day (10AM-3PM) and precautions should always be taken. Do not be fooled though, even in the cooler months or when it is overcast you can still be affected by UV rays or the heat. Sunscreen, shirts, sunglasses and lots of water are essential.

Beach safety

Many visitors to Brisbane take day trips to enjoy the very popular nearby beaches at the Gold Coast (south) or the Sunshine Coast (north). Beaches can be great fun and very enjoyable when safe. It is important to know that most of the coastal beaches are Pacific ocean beaches with little to no protection that coves and bays provide. They can become dangerous to swim in due to strong currents, rough or powerfully-breaking waves, and various harmful marine life. Ensure you only swim at beaches where and when lifeguards are on duty and between the flags displayed in front of lifeguard observers. Check with lifeguards for any present, or potential undercurrents, rips, tows, or for the presence of bluebottles, stinging jellyfish, or other potential dangers prior to swimming. Advise the on-duty lifeguards if you are inexperienced in swimming at a beach so they can give you more attention. Avoid going past waist-deep if you are not a strong swimmer. Parents should accompany their children while they swim as rips, undertows, strong currents, and rough breaking waves can cause extreme difficulty. Sadly there have been tourists who have drowned due to inexperience with swimming in an ocean setting. Do not swim after consuming alcohol as it can affect your ability to swim and has been a contributing factor in some drowning fatalities. Avoid swimming near anyone using equipment such as surfboards, windsurfers, parasails, sailing craft or power craft such as jetskis, and motorboats.

Where to go next

Brisbane provides a base for day trips to explore the southeast of Queensland. The North Coast of New South Wales can also be reached in an hour if traffic is light, but allow up to two hours travel if traffic is heavy or there is an accident on the Pacific Motorway. Queensland Rail also provides extensive services out of Brisbane to the north and south of the city and to the Gold Coast.

North West of Brisbane:

  • Samford Valley – about 30 mins drive north west of Brisbane CBD. A beautiful rural valley with a historic hamlet, Samford Village. A great day trip for the family.

North of Brisbane:

  • Glass House Mountains National Park – about an hour north of Brisbane. There is a scenic drive through the mountains with a couple of lookouts, or you can go for a hike – easy or difficult, depending on the mountain. (Mt. Beerwah offers a stern but quick scramble and a good view of the area.) There are a few small roadside shops in the area that sell homemade jams and varieties of macadamia nuts.
  • Beerwah – home of the Australia Zoo, run by the family of the late “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin. Admission is $57 for adults.
  • Sunshine Coast – 90 minutes north of Brisbane, suitable for surfers without the clutter of the more famous beaches to the south. The city of Noosa and several derivatively-named cities (e.g., Noosa Heads, Noosaville) offer short and long-term accommodation, some restaurants and a few stretches of shops aimed at tourists with and without a budget.
  • Sunshine Coast Hinterland – 90 minutes north of Brisbane. Crafts and galleries and cafés and lots of bushwalks and scenic views in the Blackall Ranges at Maleny, Montville, Flaxton and Mapleton.
  • Eumundi – famous markets on Wednesday and Saturday.
  • North Stradbroke Island and South Stradbroke Island – amazing beaches, 4WD and fishing, accommodation, all very close to Brisbane.
  • Moreton Island – Holiday destination very close to Brisbane. Dive and snorkel Tangalooma Wrecks, go sand tobogganing, 4wd.
  • Fraser Island – World Heritage listed site, offering pristine, unspoiled lakes, dunes, forests and wildlife. Camping is possible, or day-trips can be arranged from Noosa. World’s largest sand island.
  • Redcliffe This peninsula located 45 minutes north is famous for its long stretch of beach, friendly locals and excellent food, shops and climate.

South of Brisbane:

  • Gold Coast – famous for being a tourist town, approximately 70 km south of Brisbane on the Pacific Motorway.
  • Dreamworld and Whitewater World – Theme park in the western Gold Coast suburb of Coomera, on the Pacific Motorway. Many large thrill rides including the ‘Tower of Terror’ and the ‘Giant Drop’ and roller coasters. There are also child-friendly rides and Australian animal attractions and shows, as well as a Tiger exhibit. Whitewater World is a water park adjacent to Dreamworld and offers the newest technology in water rides. It costs extra to get into, but you can buy a pass that gets you into both parks for a discounted price.
  • Movieworld – Another theme park near ‘Dreamworld’ and ‘Wet ‘n’ Wild Water World.’ Generally longer, more cinematic and atmospheric rides, shows and attractions.
  • Seaworld – aquatically-themed park sandwiched on a peninsula between the Gold Coast Seaway and the Pacific Ocean, located in Southport (just north of the Gold Coast.) A few rides, but popular for its impressive animal shows and exhibits.
  • Wet ‘n’ Wild Water World – Water park on the Gold Coast, with heated rides and pools for winter. Large number of thrill rides and also mellow relaxation areas.
  • Mt. Tamborine National Park – extensive areas of National Park plus arts, crafts, galleries and the like, near several forest hikes. There are some excellent fudge shops at the top of Mt. Tamborine that offer generous free samples and a staggering variety of flavours.
  • Surfers Paradise – tourist Mecca, and arguably the most upmarket area on the Gold Coast. Located on a life-guarded beach front, host to Caville Avenue, and several shopping malls.
  • Lower Moreton Bay
  • Moreton Bay – includes places like Moreton Island (where Scooby Doo was filmed) and St. Helena Island (a former maximum security prison for convicts.)

West of Brisbane:

  • Ipswich – is located 40 km west of Brisbane. 45 minutes by road from Brisbane City.
  • Brisbane Skydiving Centre – offers tandem skydiving and advanced freefall courses. Willowbank.
  • Workshops Rail Museum – The whole family will enjoy the birthplace of Queensland Rail and enjoy the interactive exhibits at this award-winning museum. North Street, North Ipswich.
  • Brookwater Golf Club – An 18 hole Greg Norman championship golf course and Australia’s No. 2 public access course.
  • Queensland Raceway – Queensland’s premier race circuit. This is the only location near Brisbane where members of the public can drive on the same racetrack as professional drivers. Champions Way, Willowbank.
  • Bunya Mountains National Park – Three hours west of Brisbane. One of the oldest national parks in Queensland. Home of the ancient bunya pine and many other species of plants, birds and other animals. Stay at least three nights to have time to hike in the park.

Where to stay in Brisbane after the Reopening of Hotels

Hotels Brisbane: Popularity

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

Capri by Fraser Brisbane

★★★★

-12%

10693

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Meriton Suites Adelaide Street

★★★★★

-7%

109101

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Next Hotel Brisbane

★★★★

-21%

140111

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Royal On The Park

★★★★

-22%

10784

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Australia

Sydney Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

sydney1000x600

Australia’s most populous city, Sydney features a fascinating mix of modern architecture, extensive greenery, coastal setting and wild nightlife. From the futuristic Opera House to the lovely Royal National Park and from innovative art galleries to sophisticated restaurants, you will never get bored in Harbour City.

Australia Coronavirus since Reopening
27,857
Confirmed
909
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.3%
Deaths (%)
25,540
Recovered
2
Recovered (24h)
91.7%
Recovered (%)
1,408
Active
5.1%
Active (%)

Sydney is the Harbour City. It is the largest, oldest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia with an enviable reputation as one of the world’s most beautiful and liveable cities. Brimming with history, nature, culture, art, fashion, cuisine and design, it is set next to miles of ocean coastline and sandy surf beaches. The city is also home to the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, two of the most iconic structures on the planet.

Sydney is a major global city and an important finance centre in the Asia-Pacific region. The city is surrounded by nature and national parks, which extend through the suburbs and right to the shores of the harbour.

Sydney Districts

Sydney has a compact city core surrounded by sprawling suburbs, forming a vast metropolitan area. The city core, Central Sydney is shaped roughly like a stubby palm-up left hand: the heel of the thumb as City South, the thumb as the district Darling Harbour, the first finger as The Rocks, the palm with the second and third fingers as City Centre and the rest as City East.

City Centre
Home to the busy Central Business District (CBD), centre of government and finance but also home to many famous attractions (including the Opera House and the Royal Botanic Gardens), fine restaurants and shopping. Take ferries from Circular Quay to the Sydney Harbour Islands.
The Rocks
Just to the west of Circular Quay. Once the colonial village of Sydney, the Rocks is now a cosmopolitan area with history, views and shopping. It is the gateway to the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge.
Darling Harbour
An extensive leisure and entertainment area immediately to the west of the City Centre. Take an early morning trip to the fish markets and follow up by exploring the restaurants, boardwalks, aquariums, wildlife and museums around Cockle Bay. Then find a maritime pub or hit The Star casino.
City South
The Haymarket, Chinatown and Central Station area is home to markets, cafes, Chinese culture and cuisine together with cheaper accommodation and shopping.
City East
Kings Cross, Darlinghurst, Surry Hills, Woolloomooloo and Moore Park. Busy nightlife, coffee shops, fashion and entertainment by day.

Greater Sydney

Greater Sydney, the sprawling suburbs in the vast city metropolitan area surrounding Central Sydney spread for up to 100 km westward from the city centre. The traveller visiting the suburbs will find less crowded beaches, parks, cheaper shopping, commercial centres, cultural festivals and hidden gems.

Understand

History of Sydney

Sydney is the oldest European settlement in Australia, having been founded as a British penal colony on 26 January 1788 by Arthur Phillip. This day is now celebrated as Australia Day to mark the establishment of a new nation, although also regarded by many as Invasion Day that marked the beginning of the British appropriation of Aboriginal land. The settlement was named “Sydney” after Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney, who was the British Home Secretary at that time.

People

Sydney is one of the most cosmopolitan cities on the planet, with one third of its population born overseas. European settlement rapidly displaced the Aboriginal people of the Sydney area with colonists largely coming from England, Ireland and Scotland. The Australian goldrush attracted more immigrants, including a significant number of Chinese, with about one in six Australians with convict descent also having some Chinese ancestry. In the early 20th century, Sydney continued to attract immigrants – mostly from the UK and Ireland, with the White Australia Policy preventing non-European peoples (and even Southern Europeans) from settling. Australia’s immigration patterns, and consequently, that of Sydney, changed significantly after World War II, when migrants began to arrive from countries as diverse as Italy, Greece, Germany, Holland, China, New Zealand, India, the Philippines, Poland, Lebanon, Iraq, Vietnam, Thailand, South Africa and the Pacific Islands. Sydney’s culture, food and general outlook well reflect these contributions to the majority Anglo-Celtic institutions and social establishment.

Sydney is recognised worldwide for its vibrant Gay community. Every year, the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras is celebrated on the first weekend in March, drawing people from all over Australia and the world for the celebrations.

Sydney was the centre of the world’s attention in September 2000 when the city hosted the Summer Olympics – announced by the IOC Chairman at the closing ceremony to be “the best games ever”. The Olympics saw a major building and renovation program take hold of Sydney, positioning it as one of the great world cities of the 21st century.

Getting around

Sydney’s subway lines are complemented by a comprehensive bus network. Water taxis serve the seaside areas of the city, while taxi cabs are widely available on the streets. The Central Station is linked to the airport by frequent direct train routes.

Sydney’s best architecture

One of the city’s most famous landmarks, Sydney Opera House is a modern architectural treasure and an Unesco World Heritage Site. Located at Sydney Harbour, its unique design resembles multiple overlapping shells. Close to the Opera House you will find the impressive Harbour Bridge.

Standing in Market Street, Sydney’s Tower Eye is a tall modern structure, from the top of which visitors can enjoy fascinating panoramic views of the city.From modern to colonial architecture, Rocks District is ideal for taking a glimpse of beautiful buildings which date back to the time the first European residents arrived to Australia.

Sydney’s parks and zoos

Sydney offers several green zones, both within the city centre and the wider metropolitan area. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Chinese Garden of Friendship, the Domain, Hyde Park and Sydney Park are a few fine central choices for relaxing strolls and joyful pick-nicks. Suburban parks and gardens include Royal National Park, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park and Auburn Botanical Gardens, while Greater Blue Mountains Area, at the city’s western edge, houses hundreds of animal species, including some endemic such as koalas.

For an up-close look at Australian animals, visit Sidney Wildlife World, where you can see lively kangaroos, lazy koalas and tones of other endemic and international species. Dip in domestic underwater life by visiting Sydney Aquarium. Featuring a recreation of the Great Barrier Reef, the aquarium hosts dozen of colourful tropical fish and other local marine creatures. Walk down the see-through tunnels while great sharks swim over and around you.

Art in Sydney

Art Gallery of South Wales holds a wide collection of artworks from Australian artists, as well as other fascinating displays on Asian and European art, photography, prints and contemporary designs. If interested in contemporary art, also visit the Museum of Contemporary Art, Artspace Sydney and the stunning White Rabbit Gallery, which presents Chinese contemporary art pieces.

Brett Whiteley Studio presents the Australian artist’s actual studio, which has been maintained pretty much as he left it before he passed away in 1992, also featuring the unfinished painting he was working on at the time.

Sydney’s museums

Founded in 1827, Sydney’s Australian Museum is the oldest museum in the country. Come here to see Aboriginal artefacts, dinosaur remains, endemic staffed animal species and some tools and utensils from several civilizations around the globe. Located at College Street, it is housed in an impressive 19th-century building.

Be introduced to the city’s history by paying a visit to Sydney Museum. First established in 1995, the museum is built over the remains of New South Wales first Governor’s residence, featuring educating displays of items, photos and multimedia presentations which chronicle Sydney’s timeline from colonial times up to date.

Part of Sydney’s Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Powerhouse Museum is named after the former electric tram power station building, which now occupies. Most of its collections focus on science and technology, including space science, steam power, media and communication. However, art and design displays are also exhibited in this fascinating museum, which is one of the city’s most visited attractions.

Hotels after the Lockdown in Sydney

Sydney Hotels

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

Shangri-La Hotel, Sydney

★★★★★

-9%

220199

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Swissotel Sydney

★★★★★

-22%

171134

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PARKROYAL Parramatta

★★★★

-16%

8974

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Meriton Suites Kent Street

★★★★★

-12%

10794

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Flights to Sydney after Reopening

The Cheapest Round-trip Tickets from Sydney to Auckland

Departure date Return date Stops Airlines Find Ticket

03.03.2021

12.03.2021

Direct

Tickets from 493

03.03.2021

13.03.2021

1 stop

Tickets from 479

03.03.2021

13.03.2021

2 stops

Tickets from 679

 

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Australia

Adelaide Coronavirus Covid-19 Outbreak – Cases Quarantine Deaths Stats

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Regarded as one of the Australia’s most beautiful cities, Adelaide is in the southern part of Australia – and is, indeed, the capital of South Australia. It is a scenic city by all accounts: one where you can almost simultaneously enjoy the attractions associated with the coastline, those associated with the plains and those associated with the mountains.

Australia Coronavirus since Reopening
27,857
Confirmed
909
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
3.3%
Deaths (%)
25,540
Recovered
2
Recovered (24h)
91.7%
Recovered (%)
1,408
Active
5.1%
Active (%)

That is because Adelaide is located in a plain, next to a rather extensive beach line, and encompassed by mountains. It is also one of the world’s most consciously designed cities, surrounded by breathtaking parkland, and with remarkable boulevards that are interspersed with huge, well-kept public squares.

Adelaide is the national capital of South Australia. It lies on the eastern shores of Gulf St Vincent in the central, southern part of the Australian continent. Adelaide is Australia’s fifth largest city, with a population of over 1.2 million. More than three quarters of South Australians live in the Adelaide metropolitan area.

Adelaide is on a plain between the rolling Adelaide Hills and the Gulf and is bordered by many of Australia’s famous wine regions. The Barossa Valley and Clare Valley regions lie to the north, the McLaren Vale and Langhorne Creek regions to the south and the cooler climate Adelaide Hills region to the east. Historically known as the City of Churches due to its new world origins as an incubator for religious freedom, much of the architecture in the inner city is retained from the colonial era. Heavily influenced by the prevailing styles popular in England at the time, the heritage architecture is similar to many European cities built in the 19th century.

Proximity to premium wine and food growing regions, as well as waves of immigration from Germany, Italy, Greece, Vietnam, China and India have created a unique multicultural gourmet food and café culture in the City and inner suburbs. This café culture is supported by Adelaide’s global reputation for the arts and particularly the arts festivals held in March including the Adelaide Festival and the Adelaide Fringe Festival, which is second only to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in size.

The city is the home of Adelaide Oval, famed as one of Test cricket’s most picturesque grounds and under redevelopment to host AFL football matches during the winter months. Australian football has a long history in Adelaide and AFL matches are played at Adelaide Oval in North Adelaide. Adelaide and the surrounding wine regions also host the Tour Down Under, which is the largest cycling race in the Southern Hemisphere and the first stage of the UCI WorldTour.

Introduction

The South Australia time zone is 30 minutes behind Australian Standard Eastern Time (AEST) used in Victoria or New South Wales.

Weather in Adelaide

Adelaide is Australia’s driest capital city, with summers that are hot and dry, and with winters that are rainy and cool.

In summer, the average maximum is 29°C (84°F) but there is considerable variation and Adelaide can usually expect several days a year when the daytime temperatures soar above 40°C (104°F). Rainfall is light and infrequent throughout summer. The average in January and February is around 20 millimetres (0.8 inches) but completely rainless months are by no means uncommon. Given the regular hot weather, virtually every public building, indoor tourism destination and most public transport is fully air-conditioned.

In winter from June to August, the average maximum is 15–16°C (59–61°F) and the minimum is usually around 8°C (46°F). Winter sees regular rainfall with June being the wettest month of the year, averaging around 80mm. Frosts are common in the valleys of the Adelaide Hills, but rare elsewhere. Adelaide experiences no snowfall in the city centre itself, although very occasionally a small sprinkling can be observed on higher ground at the top of Mount Lofty and in the Adelaide Hills.

Autumn and spring are slow, gradual changes between the extremes of summer and winter. From mid-February to late March, Adelaide goes into its mad March festival season of arts, music and sport festivals to take advantage of the moderate climate. Spring also makes a good time to visit Adelaide, as flowers are usually in bloom following the rains of winter.

History of Adelaide

Aboriginal history

The first people to live on the Adelaide plains were the Kaurna people, whose territory extended from what is now Port Broughton to Adelaide’s north, south to Cape Jervis on the southern tip of the Fleurieu Peninsula. The Kaurna lived on the Adelaide plains in family groups called yerta, a word which also referred to the area of land which supported the family group. Each yerta was the responsibility of Kaurna adults who inherited the land and had an intimate knowledge of its resources and features. Adelaide’s rich Aboriginal history and living culture can be explored at Tandanya, an Aboriginal-owned culture and history centre on Grenfell Street. Tandanya is free to visit and tours are available for a small charge.

European settlement

Following the mapping of South Australia’s coastline in the early 19th century by European explorers Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin, an expedition down the Murray River was held which reported favourably on land on the coast of Gulf St Vincent. At the same time, British reformers were keen to establish a colony based on free settlement rather than by the transportation of convicts, as all the other Australian colonies at the time were founded. In 1834, the South Australia Company was founded and it convinced the British Parliament to pass a law which created a colony for free settlers in South Australia. In December 1836, after a 10 month journey by a fleet of ships from England, the first Governor, John Hindmarsh proclaimed the creation of the new province in a ceremony in what is now the beachside suburb of Glenelg.

After wrangling between the colonists, Adelaide’s first surveyor, William Light designed a city grid of wide boulevards surrounded by parklands, with one central square (Victoria Square) and four smaller squares (Hindmarsh, Light, Whitmore and Hurtle) set on the southern banks of the Torrens. Light’s original design, with small changes, largely survives to this day.

The city’s early industries were based around mining and agriculture, with England as the key export market. The relatively radical politics of many of the free settlers led to Adelaide being home to early progressive reform including the secret printed ballot, the first jurisdiction in the world to allow women to vote and run for Parliament and early trade unionisation and activism.

Post-Federation

Following Australian federation in 1901, South Australia began to move into secondary manufacturing industries, a process which was sent into overdrive by the long term government of the conservative Premier Thomas Playford following World War 2. Playford set out to actively attract manufacturing companies like General Motors to South Australia by offering cheap land and low taxes. This, along with the growing ubiquity of car transport, led to Adelaide’s relatively low density as workers lived close to the factories where they worked in the outer suburbs.

Mass migration from southern Europe transformed Adelaide’s Anglo-Celtic culture, with Greek migrants mainly settling in the inner western and inner southern suburbs and Italian migrants settling in the inner eastern and north-eastern suburbs. These cultural identities persist to today, with continental delis and cafés being a common feature of Adelaide’s inner city.

While South Australia’s economy boomed, its public and cultural life lost much of its early radicalism, with blue laws requiring bars and pubs to close at six in the evening – causing the “six o’clock swill”. The White Australia policy also meant that Adelaide residents were overwhelmingly from European backgrounds.

Cosmopolitan capital city

The 1960s saw a dramatic change in Adelaide’s cultural life, with the start of the Adelaide Festival of Arts and Adelaide Fringe Festival, which transformed Adelaide’s arts culture and the end of the decade saw the election of the first Labor government since the 1930s. By 1970, Don Dunstan became Premier of South Australia. Dunstan was a transformational figure and sought to reshape Adelaide in the mould of a modern cosmopolitan capital city. Dunstan’s government ended the six o’clock swill, pedestrianised Rundle Street creating Rundle Mall and built the Festival Centre, creating a hub for arts in Adelaide. His government enacted a range of progressive reforms, including making South Australia the first jurisdiction in Australia to legalise homosexuality. This time also saw changes to Australia’s immigration laws which saw Vietnamese and Chinese migrants join earlier waves of migration and the creation of communities in the north-west and western suburbs, as well as Gouger Street’s multilingual Chinatown precinct next to the Adelaide Central Market.

After losing government for one term to the conservatives at the end of the 1970s, Labor returned to office under John Bannon in the 1980s. A more business friendly leader than Dunstan, Premier Bannon sought to drive the development of Adelaide’s city, seeing the construction of Adelaide’s tallest building now known as Westpac House and the development of the Adelaide Convention Centre and Adelaide Casino, however bad bank loans saw the state-backed State Bank of South Australia collapse in the early 1990s, requiring a huge government bailout and plunging the state deep into debt.

Revival after the State Bank

The 1990s under the Liberal government led by Premiers Dean Brown, John Olsen and Rob Kerin saw the conservative government undertake asset sales and reduce government services to reduce the state debt. This reduction in government spending, as well as the decline of Australian manufacturing following the abolition of the tariff wall by the federal government, led to slow growth in South Australia’s economy and widespread emigration to the eastern capitals, particularly Melbourne.

Labor returned to office in 2002 under Mike Rann who sought to reshape Adelaide’s industrial base to focus on education services, mining and defence industry, as well as building on its strengths in wine. Rann’s government invested heavily in rebuilding the city, with overhauls to public transport, the construction of a new central hospital and the redevelopment of Adelaide Oval. Following ten years with Premier Rann as leader, Labor elected Jay Weatherill as Premier in 2011, who has largely continued this agenda, but with a renewed focus on transforming public spaces in the inner city through the relaxation of planning restrictions and looser liquor licensing for small bars.

Fly from or to Adelaide

Adelaide International Airport is surprisingly well connected, and has daily international flights to hubs in Asia, the Middle East and New Zealand which allow for one-stop connections around the globe. More frequent flights connecting via Sydney or Melbourne may be cheaper. | Adelaide International Airport is surprisingly well connected, and has daily international flights to hubs in Asia, the Middle East and New Zealand which allow for one-stop connections around the globe. More frequent flights connecting via Sydney or Melbourne may be cheaper.

The Cheapest Round-trip Tickets from Adelaide to Sydney

Departure date Return date Stops Airlines Find Ticket

04.12.2020

09.12.2020

Direct

Tickets from 195

17.12.2020

27.12.2020

1 stop

Tickets from 215

04.12.2020

09.12.2020

2 stops

Tickets from 334

Travellers from Asia can catch direct flights from Hong Kong (on Cathay Pacific), Singapore (on Singapore Airlines), Kuala Lumpur (on Malaysia Airlines), Denpasar (on Jetstar Airways) and Guangzhou (on China Southern Airlines). Travellers from the Middle East or northern Africa can catch a daily flight on Emirates via Dubai, or Qatar Airways from Doha. Travellers from Europe can take a one-stop journey to Adelaide on any of these carriers.

Travellers from South Africa can first fly direct to Perth and then connect to a domestic flight onwards to Adelaide.

Travellers from New Zealand can catch a direct flight flying daily from Auckland on Air New Zealand. Travellers from North America or South America can travel one-stop on Air New Zealand via Auckland or can transit to a frequent domestic flight after first landing in Sydney, Melbourne or Brisbane.

Domestic services within Australia include frequent services to every mainland national capital on full-service carriers and Virgin Australia. Budget carriers Jetstar and Tiger operate less frequent, heavily discounted services mainly to Melbourne, Sydney and the Gold Coast.

Regional services and operations are provided by Regional Express Airlines (Rex), Sharp Airlines, Alliance Airlines, Cobham Airlines and Qantaslink flights operated by both Cobham Airlines and by Alliance Airlines. These services operate mainly to South Australia’s regional cities and centres including Mt Gambier, Kingscote, Port Lincoln and Whyalla.

There is only a single terminal for international and domestic departures, accordingly transfers are relatively seamless. The airport has ATMs and currency change. Food and shopping is available both landside and airside. Lockers are available in the car rental area in the carpark, including some larger lockers that would fit bike boxes. Free Wi-Fi is available throughout the terminal.

Between the airport and the city

Adelaide Metro’s regular JetBus J1/J2/J7/J8 connects the airport with the City, Glenelg and some major shopping centres. J1 Services depart every 15 minutes 8AM to 6PM every day to the City, less frequent from 5AM to 11PM. The journey to the City takes around 25 minutes during peak hour. Additionally JetBus J1X offers express service from the airport to the city Monday through Friday hourly between 5 AM to 10 AM and 4 PM to 9 PM with a circular route around the CBD for more convenience to hotels. Services to Glenelg are every half hour during the day, less at night. Services to Arndale, West Lakes and Marion shopping centre are hourly during weekdays.

Buses depart from a single dedicated stop left (west) of the Short Term Car Park outside the main terminal. All buses in all directions leave from this one stop, so check the front of the bus to make sure its heading where you want to go! Realtime bus information is available for this stop and all Adelaide Metro stops or via dedicated apps for your Smartphone like metroMATE.

The JetBus is part of the Adelaide Metro network, so the standard ticket types and fares in the public transport section apply, and a ticket used on the JetBus can be used with another bus, train or tram according to its type. Metrocards are also available for sale at the airport from a vending machine next to the JetBus stop.

Taxis are available downstairs out the front of the terminal. A taxi to the City costs around $30 during the morning peak hour and around $20 at other times, which can make it as economical as the JetBus for a group. Drivers will always use the meter, but a $2 extra charge is payable in addition to the metered amount for pickups from the airport.

Major national rental car companies operate kiosks on the ground floor near baggage claim including AVIS, Budget, Europcar, Hertz, Thrifty and Redspot Sixt. The car rental car park is on the ground level directly opposite the terminal.

Travel by car to Adelaide

Adelaide is at least a day’s drive away from the capital cities on the Australian east coast. The shortest driving route from Adelaide to Melbourne takes 8–9 hours. There are some freeway sections, but the roads are mostly 2 lane roads of highway quality.

From Melbourne, Adelaide is 736km (457 mi) via Horsham (National Highway 8) or 901km (560 mi) via Mt Gambier (National Highway 1). The journey via Mt Gambier takes you through the Coonawarra wine region, one of the most famous cabernet sauvignon regions in Australia and also is convenient for a side tour via the Great Ocean Road. The trip via Horsham is more direct, on high quality highways, but has fewer tourism attractions.

From Sydney, Adelaide is 1,422km (884 mi) via Wagga Wagga and Mildura (National Highway 20). Freeway conditions from Sydney to Wagga Wagga cut hours from the trip. This route also passes close to Canberra, Australia’s national capital, which is 1,196km (743 mi) from Adelaide.

Another option from Sydney is the 1,659km (1031 mi) route via Broken Hill (National Highway 32), which takes you through the Outback and one of Australia’s most historic mining towns. The 2,031km (1,262 mi) route from Brisbane also goes via Broken Hill.

While Adelaide is the closest national capital to Perth, the 2,550km (1584 mi) journey across the Nullarbor is still arduous, though it’s a unique drive through some of the most remote places in the inhabited world. Similarly, the 3,027km (1884 mi) journey north to Darwin via Alice Springs travels through the true Outback and Uluru is only a few hours from the main highway north.

Travel by train to Adelaide

Great Southern Railway runs long distance tourist train services to and from Adelaide. The Ghan runs to Alice Springs and Darwin, The Overland runs to Melbourne, and the Indian Pacific runs to Perth, Broken Hill and Sydney. These journeys are train experiences, and offer sleepers, and the opportunity to take your car with you on the train. However, they take considerably longer and invariably cost more than the journey by bus or plane, with the exception of the Melbourne-Adelaide route, which can be cheaper than or of comparable price with air fares. Further, the trains stop at intermediate stops which may not be serviced by flight connections, particularly on the Melbourne-Adelaide route.

These interstate trains depart from the Adelaide Parklands Terminal just outside of the city. The station can be accessed by car or bus from Richmond Road. Since the demolition of Keswick station, there are no connections to the suburban train network. Taxis are also available to meet all arrivals.

There are no country rail services in South Australia.

Travel by bus to Adelaide

Interstate buses are operated by a number of coach companies including Greyhound, Firefly and V/Line. The journey from Melbourne takes around eleven and a half hours, with both day and overnight services. The trip from Sydney can take up to 24 hours and by definition, travels overnight. Fares are less than train travel, but can be more than a budget airfare if you are booking well in advance.

Regional buses to South Australian country cities and towns are also operated by the interstate bus companies, but local South Australian coach companies including LinkSA and Premier Stateliner often provide more frequent services.

Almost all interstate and regional buses depart from the Adelaide Central Bus Station at 85 Franklin Street in the City. The Central Bus Station operates 05:00-21:30, 7 days a week. It has modern amenities as well as a café and it is just across the road from the Adelaide Central Market, a Coles supermarket and Chinatown.

By ship

A range of cruise ships call at the  Port Adelaide Passenger Terminal during the cruise boat season, which runs from November to April each year. In the 2012/2013 season, ships called at the Port for a total of 26 days throughout the season. A list of ships arriving in Adelaide is available from Flinders Ports.

Getting around Adelaide

There are many ways of getting around Adelaide, meaning that you have a chance to choose the one that is most convenient to you.

Firstly, there is the option of using the buses: this being a city with a well organized bus transport system. The buses run on schedule, and they are more comfortable than what you’d get in most other cities of Adelaide’s size.

Secondly, there is the option of using trams. The tram system is quite extensive, though you will notice that, at the moment, the tram loop doesn’t get to the Adelaide Central Business District (CBD) and the city’s airports, though there are plans to extend it there. Still, it can be a nice way to get around the parts of the Adelaide Metropolis that are connected to it.

Thirdly, there is the option of using trains: especially if you are looking to go to the further flung parts of the metropolis. The good thing about Adelaide’s trains is that they are mostly on time.

Fourthly, there is the option of using a taxi. Now Adelaide’s taxis can be quite costly, but the convenience they give is unparalleled, especially for those who wish to travel in their own private space.

Fifthly, there is the option of hiring a car, and driving yourself around. There are many car hire companies in operation in Adelaide, and if you are visiting the city for an extended period of time, and you want to be driving yourself around, you can make use of the car hire services they offer.

Public transportation in Adelaide

Accurate transit directions can be obtained through Google Maps. To navigate around, just enter your “to” address and “from” address (or use current location) on your device (including iPhone, Android), then select the public transport icon. Realtime arrival information is available from the Adelaide Metro website or a number of apps for smartphones (e.g. Transittimes), use the time before your vehicle arrives to have a look around the nearby area.

Single trip tickets with unlimited transfers for two hours are sold on buses, trams and at major train stations for $5 peak and $3.00 off peak. Alternatively, a $9.10 daytrip ticket is available, allowing unlimited travel within the Adelaide Metro area for an entire day.

Travellers in Adelaide for longer than a couple of days should buy a Metrocard for $10 which comes with $5 of value included. Trips on Metrocard cost $3.19 peak and $1.75 off peak. Metrocards are sold at major train stations (Adelaide, Elizabeth, Gawler, Noarlunga Centre, Oaklands, Mawson Lakes and Salisbury) as well as most newsagents and corner stores. Metrocards can be topped up wherever they are sold as well as on trains and trams using coins or major credit cards.

There is also a $25 visitors pass that can be used for unlimited travel on the network for 3 days. After the 3 day period, the pass can be topped up and used just like a normal metrocard.

Train

The Adelaide Metro train system has four main lines, with two additional branch lines.

Travelling north:

  • The Outer Harbor Line, which goes up the Le Fevre Peninsula in the north-west of the city via Port Adelaide. The Outer Harbor line is convenient for the Semaphore tourist precinct, the historic maritime district in Port Adelaide and the Queen Street cafe strip in Croydon. The Grange line branches off the Outer Harbor line at Woodville.
  • The Gawler Line, to Gawler Central in the north of the city, through Ovingham, Mawson Lakes, Salisbury and Elizabeth.

Travelling south:

  • The electrified Seaford Line, which extends to Seaford in the far south of the city, via the beachside suburb of Brighton and Noarlunga Centre. The Seaford line provides access to beaches at Brighton and Hallett Cove, as well as Westfield Marion at Oaklands. The Tonsley line branches off the Seaford line and it only operates Monday to Friday until the early evening.
  • The picturesque Belair Line which extends to Belair in the Adelaide foothills through Blackwood and the inner south-eastern suburbs of the city. The Belair line is useful to access Belair National Park.

Buses

The Adelaide Metro has a comprehensive bus network, centred in the City. Full maps and information are available at the Adelaide Metro website. Most main roads including café precincts like The Parade, Prospect Road, Henley Beach Road, King William Road and O’Connell St are ‘Go Zones’ which have regular buses on weekdays at least every 15 minutes until the early evening. Adelaide’s bus network extends out to the outer suburbs, to the Adelaide Hills in the east, down to McLaren Vale in the south (although buses there are infrequent) and as far as Gawler in the north. It does not cover the Barossa Valley. Frequencies in the outer suburbs are much lower than in the City.

The O-Bahn is a bus rapid transit line which runs to Adelaide’s north-eastern suburbs. O-Bahn buses run from Grenfell Street in the City, entering the O-Bahn at Hackney and stop at Klemzig, Paradise and Modbury Interchanges. After finishing on the O-Bahn, the buses drives the same as a regular bus to reach its destination. O-Bahn services are very frequent, as often as every 3 to 5 minutes during peak hour to interchanges and every 15 minutes off peak.

Be warned that bus frequency declines sharply after 19:00, with hourly intervals being typical in the outer suburbs, half hourly along Go Zones and every 15 minutes on the O-Bahn. All services cease operation around midnight, so check your timetables and expect to catch a taxi if required if you are out after this time. Very basic After Midnight bus services along limited routes operate hourly after midnight on Saturday nights only.

The free City Loop (99C) bus runs on weekdays from 07:40–18:00 every 15min. On Fridays, it also runs at night 18:00-21:20 every 30min, Saturdays 08:00–17:00 every 30 minutes and Sundays (and public holidays) 10:00-17:00 every 30min. It has clockwise and anticlockwise routes each with about 30 stops taking in all the major cultural and commercial centres in the City, beginning at Victoria Square and including Adelaide Railway Station. The buses feature ground-level access ramps.

Tram

Adelaide has a tram line which runs from the Adelaide Entertainment Centre in Hindmarsh through the City, then down through the south-western suburbs to the beachside suburb of Glenelg. Travel in the City between the Adelaide Entertainment Centre and South Terrace is free, while travel to Glenelg needs a ticket or a Metrocard. Tickets can be purchased on the tram from conductors, or from ticket machines at some stops.

As well as being convenient for popular tourism destination Glenelg from the City, the tram also stops at Rundle Mall, Victoria Square near the Adelaide Central Market and at North Terrace near Adelaide Railway Station. Travelling north on the tram takes you to Hindmarsh and Bowden, the home of the Adelaide Entertainment Centre venue for stadium concerts as well as a popular cafe and restaurant strip along Port Road and the side streets alongside.

If you’re driving a car, a convenient (and popular) alternative to parking in the City is to park at the Entertainment Centre and catch the tram into the City. It only costs $4 for a whole weekday, which is much cheaper than city parking.

By foot

The City centre is relatively compact and can be easily covered on foot. Most attractions are centred around the blocks between North Terrace and Victoria Square on either side of King William Street. The core Rundle Mall shopping district is entirely pedestrianised. The Gouger Street precinct and the Adelaide Central Market are also great destinations for a walking traveller.

Travellers keen to keep up on jogging while away can use popular jogging tracks along the River Torrens and through the Parklands.

Taxis

Cabs in South Australia are white (even those operated by ‘Yellow Cabs’) and they are clearly marked. It is generally possible to hail a taxi in the street or from a major hotel during business hours in the City, but in the suburbs you typically need to call one of the company booking services listed. There are a number of cab ranks which are staffed by the Taxi Council at night on weekends. Supervised taxi ranks offer extra security with lights and supervision by a concierge and a security officer. They operate 23:00-03:00 on Fridays and 23:00-05:00 on Saturdays.

All taxis in Adelaide are required by the State Government to charge a regulated metered tariff, according to the time that the journey commences. Tariff one is the normal tariff rate and tariff two is a higher rate that applies between Monday to Friday 19:00-06:00, and on weekends and public holidays. Drivers almost always use the meter and are legally required to do so. Payment can be made by cash, EFTPOS, debit and credit cards and Cabcharge. It’s a good idea to let the driver know if you are planning to pay with a method other than cash before you start your trip, as the machines can be unreliable.

Travel by car to Adelaide

Adelaide’s city centre and inner suburbs like Glenelg, Norwood and Prospect are easily traversed walking and using public transport, however if you are expecting to spend a lot of time outside of the CBD or you are planning a trip to a wine region, a car is useful to avoid long trips on public transport or in the case of the Barossa Valley, to get around at all.

Unlike other Australian state capitals, Adelaide does not have a network of freeways leading directly into the city centre. The freeways that exist begin in the outer suburbs and are for the purpose of carrying traffic to the nearby country towns. Speed limits on most major roads are signposted at 60km/h, though the default speed limit is 50km/h if no speed limit is posted. Speed limits are strictly enforced, and even creeping ever so slightly above the speed limit may earn you a ticket with a $350 fine.

All of Adelaide’s roads as well as those throughout South Australia are toll free.

Major national rental car companies operate kiosks at Adelaide Airport on the ground floor near baggage claim including AVIS, Budget,Alpha, Europcar, Hertz, Thrifty and Redspot Sixt.

Things to see and do

There is so much to see and do in Adelaide that you’ll probably end up being spoilt for choice.

If you are a person who loves beach recreational activities, you will be glad to learn that Adelaide is a coastal city, with extensive, scenic beaches. There, you can take part in water sports, swimming, beach-side walks, or just lie about and while away your time.

If you are a person who loves wildlife, you can make a visit to the Adelaide zoo. The zoo is coincidentally, located in the Adelaide parkland, which is a tourist attraction in its own right. This is the place to see all those exotic Australian animals you have always heard of: including the Karta, the Funi and the Wang Wang.

If you are a history lover, or if you are just a visual person who loves to see interesting things, you will find Adelaide’s museums attractive. These include the South Australian Museum, the South Australian Maritime Museum and the Australian Museum of Childhood. Others include the National Museum Port of Adelaide, the Anne and Gordon Samstag Museum of Art and RM Williams Outback Heritage Museum.

If you love shopping, you can make a visit to the Rundle Mall or go for Boutique shopping at the Norwood Parade or yet still go for outlet shopping at the Harbor Town, to name but a few of Adelaide’s shopping haunts.

While in Adelaide, you may also want to go for a refreshing walk in the city’s Botanic Park, Himeji Garden or the Waterfall Gully.

Adelaide also has a vibrant nightlife, with lots of interesting pubs and nightclubs.

Where to stay after the Hotel Reopening

Hotels Adelaide: Popularity

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

ibis Adelaide

★★★★

-10%

6862

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Holiday Inn Express Adelaide City Centre

★★★★

-14%

9179

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Mayfair Hotel

★★★★★

-8%

139128

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Adelaide Riviera Hotel

★★★★

-9%

7063

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Learn

Three different universities call Adelaide home, of which the University of Adelaide is the best regarded. The other two universities in the Adelaide area are the University of South Australia and Flinders University. There are opportunities for international students to enroll in these universities, either as degree students, or as part of exchange programmes with foreign universities.

Where to go next from Adelaide

The German settlement of Hahndorf, nestled in the Adelaide Hills, is a popular spot for tourists and locals alike.

Adelaide Hills, including the Mt Lofty Summit, provides stunning views of the Adelaide metropolitan area. The Adelaide Hills are a series of villages, each having its own unique character. In particular, the towns of Hahndorf and Stirling are worth visiting.

  • The wine regions of the Adelaide Hills, McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley and Clare Valley
  • Kangaroo Island. Explore the natural environment.
  • Flinders Ranges. Head north to explore the natural beauty and frontier history of the Flinders Ranges and Wilpena Pound
  • Victor Harbor, just an hour or so drive south of Adelaide. Granite Island is one of the few places you can see Fairy Penguins in their natural habitat. Visit the nearby surf beaches in Pt Elliot, Middletown and Goolwa.
  • Whispering wall, at the Barossa Reservoir.
  • Yorke Peninsula is a popular holiday destination for Adelaidians, and less touristy than Victor Harbor, with towns dotted along the coast and the rugged Innes National Park at the foot of the peninsula.
  • Alice Springs, 1,500 km of driving. Main stops on the way are Port Augusta and Coober Pedy. Eventually, heading through the Northern Territory you will reach the turn off to Uluru.
  • Melbourne, via Coorong National Park, followed by the Limestone Coast and finally the Great Ocean Road before arriving in Melbourne.
  • Eyre Peninsula. Visit the historic town of Port Lincoln where you can see the massive tuna farms as well as going diving with Great White Sharks (in a cage) or swim with the dolphins and the seals.

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Australia

Stranded Backpackers in Australia : Down Under at their lowest Point

Stranded Backpackers in Australia : Down Under at their lowest Point

Backpackers from all over the world have so far been important agricultural assistants in Australia but now they are avoided in the corona crisis.

SYDNEY | Party at Bondi Beach,hot music, sweaty bodies, languages ​​from all over the world, flirting and laughing – and lots of alcohol. There is hardly a place in Australia that attracts more young backpackers than Sydney’s most famous beach.

The celebration in mid-March however, was illegal and the authorities had banned people gathering because of Covid-19. Many backpackers didn’t care much and hundreds of them sunbathed on the beach, dozens gathered on the roof terrace to celebrate and infected each other with the virus, until the police intervened.

Such behavior was one of the reasons why Bondi Beach and other beaches remained closed for weeks, both for guests and residents.

Like Massara Donnici, the 20-year-old German has been in Australia since last August and after losing her job at the cafe because of Corona, she is stuck in the central Australian city of Alice Springs, without a job and money. She tells of the antipathy that met her when she asked for help at the employment office: “You are asked to go home. ‘Australia First.’ ”

Sudden fears

Donnici came into the country like thousands of backpackers with the so-called working holiday visa and it allowed young people to work for up to three years, depending on their origin, but most countries in Europe have a corresponding agreement with Canberra.

Foreigners often work in jobs that Australians do not like to do themselves, for example as harvest helpers in orchards farms and in recent years, backpackers have become an important workforce, especially in the country.

The “Adopt a Backpacker” campaign tries to help tourists with accommodation

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Australia Covid19 Alert

Covid-19 Australia
27,857
Confirmed
4
Confirmed (24h)
0
Deaths (24h)
2
Recovered (24h)

According to the Government in Australia, Australia has confirmed 4 new Covid-19 infections within Australia in the last 24 hours and furthermore 0 deaths have been reported throughout Australia. With the new deaths of 0, Australia now has a total of 27,857 Coronavirus/Covid-19 infections and the official death rate reported by the government of Australia is 3.3%. 909 died in Australia.

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