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Featured Hotels with Discount in Austria during Covid-19 Featured Hotels with Discount in Austria during Covid-19

Austria

Featured Hotels with Discounts in Austria

Austria tourism industry has been very hard hit during the Coronavirus pandemic with plenty of hotels and resorts offering a discount of up to 50% in the major Austrian cities. The Covid-19 situation seems to be fully under control and Austria wants to restart the economy with promoting domestic travel first before they open the border again to Germany, Switzerland etc.

Featured Hotels in Vienna

HotelStarsDiscountPrice per night, fromChoose dates

Austria Trend Hotel Messe Wien

★★★

-9%

10394

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Star Inn Hotel Premium Wien Hauptbahnhof, by Quality

★★★

-16%

7966

View Isaan Hotel Deals

25hours Hotel beim MuseumsQuartier

★★★★

-20%

146118

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Featured Hotels in Innsbruck

HotelStarsDiscountPrice per night, fromChoose dates

STAGE 12

★★★★

-20%

146116

View Isaan Hotel Deals

AC Hotel by Marriott Innsbruck

★★★★

-10%

10292

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Hotel Innsbruck

★★★★

-13%

127110

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Nala Individuellhotel

★★★★

-21%

11894

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Hotel Maximilian - Stadthaus Penz

★★★★

-16%

143120

View Isaan Hotel Deals

aDLERS Hotel Innsbruck

★★★★

-20%

181145

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Featured Hotels in Graz

HotelStarsDiscountPrice per night, fromChoose dates

Palais Hotel Erzherzog Johann

★★★★

-15%

119102

View Isaan Hotel Deals

 

 

 

 

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Reporting mainly on the Asia Pacific region and the global Coronavirus crises in countries such as the United States, Mainland China, Brazil, Mexico, Italy and Germany. Love to Travel and report daily on destinations reopening with a focus on Domestic travel within Europe, North America and the Caribbean. Fan of the English Premier League , the German Bundesliga,, the Spanish La Liga.

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Austria

Mayrhofen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Tyrol Austria

Mayrhofen1000x600

Mayrhofen is a skiing resort in Austria. It’s also the main base for skiing on the slopes of Zillertal valley.

Understand

The city brochure found in the tourist office is unexpectedly useful and comprehensive—surely grab a copy for your stay. It includes timetables for all trains and buses running from and around the city (including the skibus lines around Zillertal valley) and lists most businesses you may ever need in the city. It largely duplicates content from the Mayrhofen official site.

Austrian Coronavirus since Reopening
16,843
Confirmed
672
Deaths
2
Deaths (24h)
4.0%
Deaths (%)
15,742
Recovered
25
Recovered (24h)
93.5%
Recovered (%)
429
Active
2.6%
Active (%)

Tourist InformationAm Marktplatz 219, , fax+43 6760-33 From Dec 19: open Mon-Sat 9am-6pm, Sun 1am-1pm; reduced hours on 24-26 Dec, 31 Dec, 1 Jan. Travelers mix: Russians are most frequent visitors; after them go UK and Benelux.

When to go

Most agents (and therefore hotels themselves) sell lodging in weekly packs, Saturday afternoon to next Saturday morning.

This results in higher prices for some services (e.g. private instructors) for Sun-Tue, and lowest prices for Fri-Sat.

Arrival day

To get most of your time at the resort, use your arrival day to prepare everything you need for entering slopes from the early morning of the next day. To make sure you have enough time for everything, plan to arrive to your hotel not later than check-in time, and go for preparations immediately.

Here are the average open hours for Saturday of different businesses you will likely need:

  • 2pm: check-in time at your hotel
  • 8am – 6pm (Sun from 9am): business hours for most skiing schools. Allow at least 15 minutes to settle all details.
  • 8am – 6pm: business hours for most ski rental shops. Allow at least half an hour for fitting, plus queue if it suddenly happens to be.
  • 8am – 4:30pm: business hours for skipass sales counter, as the whole lift closes at 4:30pm (but it takes just 5 minutes plus queue to buy skipass on the next morning)

Other hours for a typical day

  • breakfast at hotel: 7am-10:30am
  • skiing schools, group courses: 9:45am–12:15pm / 1pm-3:30pm (start time is for a meeting point up after ski lifts)
  • dinner at hotel (typical halfboard): 7pm-10pm

What things cost

  • skipass 5 of 7 days: €180 (6 days 205 euro)
  • ski equipment rental: €50-60 per week per person
  • ski school (group courses, 2.5 hours per day): €102 / 111 for 3 / 4 days
  • ski school (private instructor, 4 hours per day): € 180 / 165 / 160 per day for Sun-Tue, Wed-Thu, Fri-Sat
  • ski rental + 5 days group courses package: €169
  • average lunch (soup + average main): €20
  • double room in an average 3-star hotel: €110-140 in Jan-Feb

Get in

By train

From/to Munich

Trains from Munich start in the Hauptbanhof. There are trains directly to Jenbach.

Once in Jenbach go to the Zillerteilbahn platform (ZL). The train will run from Jenback to Mayrhofen ever 30 minutes. It will take about an hour and a half. The cost is around 7 euro. You can buy the ticket directly on the train from the ticket man. The Zillerteilbahn becomes very busy with skiers towards the end. If you have luggage, store it conveniently to make room for everyone. Travel by train in this area is very easy.

From/to Milan

Trains from Milan also are available. This is the same train from Munich. Depending on airline tickets you can arrive at either place and start your train travel.

From/to Vienna

Trains to Mayrhofen from Vienna depart from West Bahnhof on the west of the city, not from Wien Mitte in the downtown.

If you travel with a 1-1.5-year toddler, getting in from Vienna to Mayrhofen by train is really comfortable compared to rented car. It takes 6 hours and you’ll need to make a connection, but:

  • connection in Jenbach is quite comfortable: there’s elevators and no stairs to overcome; train to Mayrfohen departs roughly every 30min so you won’t wait long
  • there is a restaurant coach quite comfortable for children
  • toddler is not sitting still in a car child seat for several hours, but have some space (make sure you book your seats in a carriage with compartments)
  • seats allow horizontal position for a toddler to sleep, especially if there are empty seats in your compartment

It’s impossible to buy a full-ride ticket from Mayrhofen to Vienna (not to mention reserve seats). Mayrhofen train station sells tickets only for narrow-gauge railway, and you need to separately buy tickets for your next leg in Jenbach, connection station. Therefore either purchase return tickets together with the onward tickets from Vienna to Mayrhofen, or book via internet with  .

By car

You won’t need chains on tyres to travel to Mayrhofen from any major city.

Get around

Any point of Mayrhofen can be easily reached by foot; it takes maximum of 1 hour walk to get from one end to another.

There’s even no need to have a car for skiing on other slopes of Zillertall valley—ski buses take you everywhere, and free most of the time. They also don’t mind boarding a parent with a toddler and a stroller, you don’t even need to ask nicely most of the time.

Do

Ski / snowboarding

There are two ski lifts in Mayrhofen itself: Penken and Ahorn. Besides them there are about dozen of ski lifts in nearby villages, all of them are easily reachable from Mayrhofen thanks to free ski buses (there are several different lines operating from/around the city). Those include Hintertux glacier.

Skipasses can also be purchased with a discount at Ascent Travel, which can be found in the lobby of Sporthotel Strass.

Unlike some other skiing resorts, helmets are not mandatory to enter pistes, but as always common sense recommends to wear it whenever on piste.

Basics of skiing resort

Grab a copy of pistenplan at skipass sales office or at Tourist Information; keep it with you while skiing. There are some maps on the slopes, but too rare for an unexperienced skier.

Ski cellars. Most hotels have a special room for storing guests equipment—frequently called ski cellar. This is also a place to dry your boots overnight—which is absolutely recommended, as otherwise your next day will be uncomfortable skiing in wet boots. The topmost rack is most effective, as only there no snow from the upper boots gets down.

Skiing schools

There is a total of about 10 skiing schools in Mayrhofen. To give you idea of their services, prices and conditions, below are two most widely sold and prominently located schools. Be careful with “the only school with certified instructors speaking your language here” touting: in most cases, it only applies to private instructors who are much more expensive than group lessons.

  • Die Rotten Profis, ,  Mon-Fri: 8am-6pm; Sat: 8am-6pm; Sun 8am-6pmIn group courses, those who joined in the beginning of week are forced to repeat the same set of introductory exercises day after day as new members are allowed to join the group every day.
  • Skischule Mayrhofen 3000 (main office), Hauptstraße 455, ,  Mon-Fri: 8am-11am, 3-6pm; Sat: 8am-7pm; Sun 8am-12pm, 1-6pm.

With children

Skiing schools accept children for training from 3 years old.

Ski rental

There are more than 10 shops offering equipment rental, and the competition is quite tough—so expect their services and quality to be quite similar to each other.

No cash deposit is required in exchange for the equipment you rent.

If you choose to learn with a skiing school, the easiest option is to rent equipment right with them—after the declared “special discount for school clients” it’s maximum 10% more expensive than in a dedicated rental shop.

In any case, most shops (and schools) offer a good choice of equipment levels, from very beginners to quite advanced.

Logistics is that you take the full set of equipment for the whole duration of rental (e.g. 7 days) and return it to the rental shop only on the last day. During that period, you either store take full equipment to a hotel after each day, OR leave them at one of the ski depots (i.e. paid storages) at the base station or in the city just near the ski lift station. The only exception is SkiZone rentals, who offer free nightly storage of equipment you rented from them.

With a toddler

A typical scenario for a family with a 1.5-year toddler is that in the morning one parent rides on slopes while other stays with children, and in the afternoon they change.

Walking around the village with a toddler is absolutely boring for him, and best avoided as much as possible. Leaving kindergarten aside (see Cope section), there are several things to do in Mayrhofen:

  • riding on sleds on a small children’s slope just near exit from Penken lift. Rent them for €3 per day in a depot, or buy rounded sled in any shop down in the city. You’ll need a second skipass for that (for half a day will work most of the time), and there’s no trick to avoid that.
  • find a playground in the village, although it can be tricky: access to most of them are restricted to respective hotel’s clients
  • spend time in swimming pool & wellness complex

Healthy alternatives to apres ski

Activities:

  • swim and take sauna in welness complex
  • skate on the rink near the wellness complex

Places:

  • Erlbenisbad Mayrhofen (swimming pool, aqua center, sauna and spa complex), Waldbadstraße 539, , fax+43 5285 62559-50Swimming pool: 10:30am-9pm; sauna: 12pm-9:30pmSauna complex: non-separate attendance only; four types of sauna, soaking pool, an outdoor balcony to walk on snow or sit down at a deckchair and cool off for a while. Swimming pool features: Sauna+swimming pool: €14, unlimited time. Towels are rented for €1, with a deposit of 10 per company.
    • two indoor water slides: (101m and 65m).
    • a swimming tube (a whirling corridor), which is half-ring shaped corridor with artificial flow
    • a jacuzzi pool accommodating 6-7 persons
    • a number of outdoor facilities open in summer only
Sauna and swimming pool have independent entries and changing rooms, but can be visited from one to another with a ticket applied to electronic gates. The drawback is it makes you carry your ticket everywhere in one complex.

Pistes details

Penken

  • #7: has 2 or 3 points of misleading navigation and two nearly horizontal pieces—easy to overcome if you gain enough speed before them. Worth it for a long wide-and-safe sector for a good speed.
  • #8: Very comfortable for safe and speedy skiing, from beginning to end. Perfect for those bored by #2 and #20 and find #7 too difficult to navigate, but #5 and #6 still look too breathtaking

Hintertux

  • #2: although it’s marked as red, it’s quite comfortable for intermediate skiers. To have enough control, having even snow here is more important that for many other pistes; otherwise you’ll bump on snowdrifts too often—head here in the early morning.
  • #15: is most oriented towards beginners; very simple and short
  • #17: has two sectors which are safe for speedy riding.

Buy

There are 5 or 6 sport goods stores in the city. They will help to cover a missing piece in your equipment (lost/forgotten/broken ), but don’t expect to find too serious brands or professional equipment.

Beyond skiing equipment, there is some choice of perfumes, toys—but prices are generally higher than in Insbruk or in Vienna airport duty-free shop.

There also are several discount multi-brand stores selling high-street brands.

Food specialties

Wine:

  • wine storenear Gasthof Brueckeuntil 6pmFeatures ice wine for €12 for a small bottle.

For toddlers

There are 2 or 3 drug stores where baby food and diapers are available.

  • DM Drodgerie Markt (pharmacy), Dursterstrasse 220,, . Arguably the best choice of baby stuff: 2 or 3 brands of diapers (Pampers; DM’s white label and sometime others); several brands of baby food (Hipp and others); plus fruit puree in specialty packaging: paste in tubes.

Eat

With children

  • Kostner (cafe and confectionery). Probably the most popular in the city among families with young children (roughly 1-5 years); they occupy roughly 50% of tables. Lovely cafe with some food also (mostly sandwiches and pasta)–despite being quite a tourist trap, as 90% of others in the town. Key feature for children is a cave leading to a heated balcony full of toys where “no parents allowed” (cave is too small). Also features an outdoor terrace open in winter–great for a cup of coffee or two. Probably have free wifi–inquiry waiters. Try their strudel. Desserts around €3; gluhwein €3.90; cappuccino about €3.

Where to stay in Mayrhofen

Mid-range

  • Gasthof Bruecke (guesthouse). Check-in: 2pm, check-out: 10amA decent choice for a family with a toddler. Sold in Sat-to-Sat weeks most of the time in winter. Large rooms with 3 wardrobes in every double; free private sauna complex with several types of sauna (5pm-8pm; non-separate attendance only; come there at 5pm straight to grab your towel and bathrobe). Halfboard dinner (7pm-10pm) is good value for money and filling; a choice of 3 mains changes daily, but expect to pay extra 1/3 to 1/2 of a normal dinner price for drinks (an average drink is €3). Breakfast (7am-10:30am) is just normal, nothing more; doesn’t change from day to day. Dedicated room to store guests’ skiing equipment (called “ski cellar”). Large part of guests come here with a packaged tour; about 50% of guests are Russians. Loud apres ski in a nearby building from 5pm to 9pm (but never later) on one wing, with an identical music set daily; disco operating till late night (11pm, later on weekends?) on the other–both a unique feature for a hotel in the city for a younger crowd; ask for a more quiet room when booking if you are not that type. Very unhelpful reception. Wifi internet available only near reception and in the bar area, at €5 per hour. double with halfboard: Jan-Feb: €140.

Splurge

There are only four hotels rated as 4* or 5* in the city:

  • Hotel Neue Post (4*), Haupstraße 400, ,  700m walk to Penken ski lifts.
  • Hotel Neuhaus (4*), Am Marktplatz 202, . double with halfboard, winter: €144..240 depending on season.
  • Sporthotel Strass (4*), Hauptstraße 470, ,  Featuring large wellness complex; just the next door to Penken ski lift. €87-112 in Dec-Feb for a regular double, half board.
  • Hotel Elizabeth (5*), Einfahrt Mitte 432, ,  Located just at the car entry to the city; 600m walk to Penken ski lift.

Telecommunications in Mayrhofen

Mobile

There are 4 or 5 shops with mobile contracts, but all are quite far away from the main street. Consult the tourist office brochure for exact addresses and directions.

Internet Cafe’s in Mayrhofen

Internet access is rare and expensive in the city; there are only one or two cafes offering free wifi—while most hotels have exorbitant prices like €5 per hour.

Cope

Weather conditions on the ski slopes are very close to what is in the Mayrhofen itself; it’s only significantly colder (and more wind) on Hintertux glacier: expect temperatture there to be 5°C colder.

With children

  • Ski kindergarten at Penken, by Total SMT ski school (Skikinderhort am Penken), Skihuette Penken, ,  9am-3:30pmSupervises children from 2 to 4 years in their own children playroom at Penken, on hourly / daily basis.
  • Wuppy’s kinderland (kindergarten), Waldbadstraße 539, . 9am-5pm weekdaysDeclares to handle well children from 3 months to 7 years. Book your stay on a previous day to secure a place. If leaving your child for a first time in his life, start from the very first day, from a 5 minutes initial stay, increasing duration slowly day after day. €20 for half a day; € 30 for a full day.
  • Tourism Association Mayrhofen (babysitting service agency), . call Mayrhofen tourist info office for details

Go next

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Austria

Ellmau Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Tyrol Austria

Ellmau1000x600

Ellmau (population 2020) is a small Tyrolean village in the heart of the Wilder Kaiser mountains. Visitors can travel to the top of Hartkaiser mountain via the Hartkaiserbahn funicular, the only of its type in the Ski Welt.

Austria Coronavirus since Reopening
16,843
Confirmed
672
Deaths
2
Deaths (24h)
4.0%
Deaths (%)
15,742
Recovered
25
Recovered (24h)
93.5%
Recovered (%)
429
Active
2.6%
Active (%)

Get in

Fly to Ellmau

Visitors normally fly to Innsbruck (90km), Salzburg (75km) or Munich (152km); onward connections to Ellmau are by rail or shuttlebus.

By rail

Main line railway stations are in Sankt Johann in Tirol and Kufstein,

A local bus network runs west through Söll to Kufstein and east to Sankt Johann in Tirol.

By road

Ellmau is located to the south of B178, a road joining Salzburg in the east to Kufstein and Innsbruck to the west. The nearest autobahn is at Kufstein.

In the summer and winter tourist seasons there are buses between Going, Stanglwirt, Scheffau am Wilden Kaiser, Blaiken and Söll (Hohe Salve) for skiers or summer hikers. SkiWelt   (+43 5333 400) operates a Skibus through the region.

Ellmau is accessible from Innsbruck and Salzburg via taxi. Munich offers car hire service.

Get around

Having a car gives the advantage of being able to travel around freely.

There are many bus services running throughout the area.

What to do in Ellmau

  • Skiing
  • Hiking

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Hall in Tirol Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Tyrol Austria

hall1000x600

Hall is a city in Tyrol near Innsbruck.

Understand

Hall in Tirol is a historic town in Tyrol with about 12.300 inhabitants.

  • Tourist Office (Tourismus Verband Hall Wattens), Unterer Stadtpl. 19 (next to Castle Hasegg), . Monday to Friday 09-18, Sa 09-13Free.
Austria Coronavirus since Reopening
16,843
Confirmed
672
Deaths
2
Deaths (24h)
4.0%
Deaths (%)
15,742
Recovered
25
Recovered (24h)
93.5%
Recovered (%)
429
Active
2.6%
Active (%)

History

The name Hall was first mentioned as salina (a salt making facility) near the Thaur castle in 1232, and its current name dates back to 1256. Like many other cities like Halle, Schwäbisch Hall, and Hallstatt, the name is derived from the Celtic word for ‘salt’. Its salt mine has been in operation since the 13th century, and started in 1272 with the construction of a brine pool from which a 10 km long pipeline transported brine to an evaporation pond at Hall in Tirol. The fame of Hall in Tirol’s salt spread far beyond Austrian borders, and salt was exported to Switzerland, the Black Forest and the Rhine Valley, among others. The economic importance of the salt trade remains symbolized in the town’s coat of arms, depicting a pair of lions holding a cask of salt. Hall in Tirol was granted the status of town in 1303, and its development accelerated from the 14th century onward.

The flourishing new town saw misfortune in 1447 however, when a fire broke out that levelled large parts of the upper town. Income from the salt trade allowed for quick recovery, and the decision to move the Tyrolian mint from Merano to Hall in Tirol contributed an additional development boost. The mint of Hall in Tirol is best known for producing the largest silver coin in European history, the Guldengroschen. The world’s first automated coining machine was deployed in Hall in Tirol in the 16th century, of which a replica can be seen in the Hall Mint Museum in the Burg Hasegg.

Hall in Tirol was one of the most important towns of the Habsburg Empire in the 15th and 16th century, and many of its churches, monasteries and convents date from this period. The appreciation of this architecture led Hall in Tirol to have its historic town centre preserved exceptionally well. The military garrison station in the town and its freight train station made Hall in Tirol a target for allied bombardments in World War II. Aside from the obliterated train station, the town survived almost unscathed, and now has the largest intact old town in western Austria for visitors to discover.

Orientation

Hall in Tirol shares the Inn Valley with numerous other towns, among which the largest is the regional national capital Innsbruck ca. 5 km to its east. To the west, Hall in Tirol borders Wattens. The town has an elevation of 574 m, and is surrounded by the mountains of the Nordkette massif.

Get in

Travel by train to Hall in Tirol

The easiest way to reach Hall in Tirol is by train, given its railway station on the Inn Valley railway line connecting Innsbruck to Wörgl (and further Kufstein and Munich). From Innsbruck main station (Hbf), 8 minutes away from Hall in Tirol, there are connections to Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Feldkirch.

From Innsbruck there are direct connections to Italy over the Brenner Pass, a very scenic and recommendable journey. Upon completion of the Brenner Base Tunnel, Brixen will be reachable from Hall in Tirol under the hour.

  • Bahnhof Hall in Tirol (Hall in Tirol railway station), Bahnhofstraße 14aTo reach Hall in Tirol, take S1, S2 or S3 from Innsbruck Hbf.

By bus

Bus lines 4123, 4125, 4130, 4134, and 4169 traverse Hall in Tirol at Unterer Stadtplatz, which is within 1 km radius of most tourist attractions. Bus 4125 offers a direct connection to Innsbruck Hbf eastbound, and to Wattens westbound.

Get around

Hall in Tirol is small enough to traverse by foot, and all tourist attractions can be reached within half an hour walk.

See

  • Old Town (Altstadt). The historic city centre of Hall in Tirol is among the best preserved old towns on the west side of Austria, having survived the 2 World Wars nearly undamaged. Enjoy a walk through the medieval streets! For architecture lovers, there are ample historic buildings (in German) to be discovered in and around the old town.
  • xHasegg Castle (Burg Hasegg). Castle and mint, completed in 1300 at the height of Hall in Tirol’s expansion as centre of commerce and salt trade in Tyrol. It originally served as a defensive structure to protect the nearby salt mines, along with the then critical bridge across the Inn near the old Roman Road. The Castle became universally famous the second half of the 18th century for minting silver coins, of which over 17 million were produced. It produced silver coins until the Napoleonic Wars in 1806 due to shortage of silver supply. The Castle is currently a museum, with demonstrations of historic minting processes given from time to time. It is also worth a visit for its early Gothic Tyrolean fortress architecture with a heavily tarnished copper roof on the mint tower.
  • Mint Hall (Münze Hall), Burg Hasegg 6 Münze Hall, , fax+43 5223 5855 820 M-Su 10:00-17:00Since 2003 hosting the Mint Museum, with a history of minting technology in Europe on display. Visitors can mint their own copper, gilded copper or silver coins for a fee of €2.50 (copper) to €18 (silver). Adults €8, children €6, students and elderly €6.50. Combi tickets are available for Mint Hall and Mint Tower from €8..
  • Mint Tower (Münzerturm), Burg Hasegg 6, , fax+43 5223 5855 820 M-Su 10:00-17:00Built under Archduke Sigmund’s rule between 1490 and 1500, this 45 m tall tower can be visited by anyone willing to climb the 204 steps to its top. The shape of the tower is fairly unusual with a round five-storey substructure ca. 10 m diameter. On top of it rests a three-storey dodecagon. It served as a watchtower guarding access to the salt mines and evaporation ponds. Two Baroque sundials and a mechanical clock decorate the tower and provided salt workers with a notion of time. Adults €5.50, children €4.50, students and elderly €5. Combi tickets are available for Mint Hall and Mint Tower from €8..
  • Thöml Castle (Thöml-Schlössl), Mitterweg 8A castle with unusual architecture dating back to 1710 when it was called Buggerhof. It was used as the base of operations for Jesuits, who founded a branch in Hall in Tirol in 1569 at the behest of Archduke Ferdinand of Tyrol and his sisters Magdalena and Helena. When the Order was disbanded in 1773, the residence transferred to the Bliem family who opened an inn. The entrance gate is still decorated with a fresco of a Jesuit priest, accented by a cross. The exterior of the castle has been renovated numerous times, but most of its original interior is preserved.
  • St. Nicholas Parish Church (Pfarrkirche St. Nikolaus), PfarrplatzOne of the most impressive Roman Catholic churches in the Inn Valley. The church was founded in 1281 and dedicated to St. Nicholas, but was soon too small to accommodate the growing salt mining city’s population. It was rebuilt and expanded in 1352 and throughout the 15th century to cope with the continuously expanding city population. The church was severely damaged by an earthquake on the evening of 17 July 1670, which caused the tower to collapse. It was replaced with a Baroque style tower in 1676. Throughout the 20th century the ceiling paintings were renovated. The painting of the high altar is from Flemish painter Jan Erasmus Quellinus dated 1657, and portraying angels together with the church patron Nicholas. Notable is also the organ, built in 1689 by Franz Köck and renovated in 1999 according to the original build plans. Another curious story is the history of the bells in the tower. The originals were cast in 1570 by Christoph Löffler, but melted down during the World War II to be used for military purposes. Bell foundry Grassmayr, which can be visited in Innsbruck, casted 3 new bells in 1951 to fill the void in the tower. Free.
  • Herz-Jesu-Basilika.
  • Mining Museum (Bergbaumuseum), Fürstengasse 2 The museum focuses on the history of salt extraction in Hall in Tirol, its most important economic activity dating back to the 13th century. On display are galleries, shafts, tools, and salt minerals like halite and sylvite, that give visitors an insight in how the situation used to be underground. The museum opened in 1928 and can be found in the historic city centre. There are regular tours on Monday, Thursday and Saturday starting from 11:30 and lasting ca. 1 hour. Adults €5, children, students and elderly €3.

Go next

  • Innsbruck — regional capital of Tyrol and largest city in the Inn valley, 5 km east of Hall in Tirol
  • Igls — between Innsbruck and the Patscherkofel mountain
  • Eng — the largest alm in Europe and one of the most remote settlements in the Alps
  • Wattens — home of the Swarovski Crystal Company
  • Schwaz — commercial centre in the Inn valley

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Austria

See Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Tyrol Austria

See1000x600

See is a town in the Paznaun Valley in Tyrol, Austria, roughly halfway between Kappl and Landeck, to which it administratively belongs. It is the first town in the valley, with a population of ca. 1260 at an elevation of 1050 m.

Austria Coronavirus since Reopening
16,843
Confirmed
672
Deaths
2
Deaths (24h)
4.0%
Deaths (%)
15,742
Recovered
25
Recovered (24h)
93.5%
Recovered (%)
429
Active
2.6%
Active (%)

Understand

The name See literally means lake, a reference to the Badesee, a small lake around which the town evolved.

History of See

See was founded at the beginning of the 15th century by farmers, a small settlement first documented in 1433 as “by the lake in Paznaun“.

During the Tyrolean Rebellion of 1809, See was the scene of an intense battle between Tyrolean rebels and the invading Bavarian troops. Although outnumbered 800 against 1500, superior knowledge of the terrain and guerrilla tactics were successful in preventing the Bavarian invasion of the Paznaun valley. Among the best documented counter attacks were stone avalanches unleashed by the defenders.

In the 20th century, See gradually lost its agricultural character and reoriented its economy towards tourism.

Get in

See does not have a train station, and can only be reached from Landeck by bus. Up to 2 x per hour, bus 260 connects See to the other towns and villages in the Paznaun Valley, and to . At the station, take bus 260 on platform C right across the station entrance. The journey to See takes ca. 24 minutes and doesn’t require transfers, making it convenient when carrying luggage such as skis. A ticket costs €3.60 when purchased in advance online. Get off at .

For long distance travel options, see Paznaun Valley.

Get around

See

  • Saint Sebastian Church (Pfarrkirche hl. Sebastian). A late Baroque Roman-Catholic church built in 1445, and underwent subsequent renovations in 1758, 1770, and finally in 1891 when it was inaugurated officially as the parish church of See.
  • Cemetery Chapel (Friedhofskapelle). Chapel opposite of the church, known for its crucifix from the hand of Andreas Thamasch from 1675. The Pieta is a mid 18th century creation from sculptor Johann Ladner. It underwent renovations in 1964 to restore the frescoes on the walls.
  • Wiesberg Castle (Schloss Wiesberg), Wiesberg 68on requestWhere the Paznaun Valley and Stanzer Valley meet, Wiesberg Castle was originally built as a monastery in the 13th century but later took on a defensive function. At the end of the 14th century, the castle was owned by the Counts of Tyrol and passed on to the Rottenburgers, after which it changed hands numerous times. The castle became the scene of an intense battle between Tyrolean troops and Bavarian invaders during the 1809 Tyrolean Rebellion. After changing hands a few more times, the castle eventually lost its strategic role and fell into disrepair. The by then dilapidated area was acquired by the Austrian State Railways with the intent to construct a railway bridge nearby. The castle’s chapel, built at the end of the 16th century, was execrated and demolished to prepare for the construction. The castle was eventually purchased by the Landfried family which started a much needed renovation. It played an important role in the World War II, when the German Wehrmacht moved into the castle and began ceasefire negotiations with the Allied troops pursuing retreating German forces.
  • Trisanna Bridge (Trisannabrücke). Part of the Arlberg Railway, with Wiesberg Castle at is eastern bridgehead. The bridge spans the Paznaun Valley at an altitude of 87 m, crossing the Trisanna river as well as the Paznaun Valley’s only access road. With a length of 230 m, the bridge has 3 and 4 stone arches at the sides with a span of 9 m, and a steel arch bridge in the middle which spans 120 m. It was constructed in 1883 as part of the Arlberg Railway construction. The electric lighting installed for the construction was a sensation at the time. Heavier trains required reinforcements in 1923, and eventually the entire steel middle structure needed replacement in 1964. A stronger copy was constructed next to the existing arch resting on temporary scaffolding, and then pushed in place in the night of 15 and 16 November 1964, a process that only took 10 hours. The final push of the 1600 tons bridge was registered by earthquake sensors in Switzerland.

Do

Winter sports

See has relatively new and growing ski infrastructure in close proximity of the town. The 8-person  Versing gondola lift opened in 2014 and gives skiers access to the Ascherhüttenkessel, an area known for good powder snow and free ride skiing. A day pass costs €41.50 for adults and €26 for children, and most of the slopes are open from mid December until mid April from 08:30-16:00.

NameTel.Altitude30px / 30px / 30px30px / 30px / 30px
See in Tyrol+43 50 990 1001040 – 2456 m7 Lifts: 2 / 2 / 341 km Pistes: 8 / 25 / 8

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Austria

Ischgl Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Tyrol Austria

ischgl1000x600

Ischgl is a ski resort in the Paznaun Valley in Tyrol, Austria.

Understand

Ischgl is a modern Alpine town with a population of ca. 1600 roughly half way up in the Paznaun Valley (Paznauntal) between Galtür and Kappl. It is highly urbanized and touristic, with more hotel rooms than residents, especially popular in winter as a ski resort. It attracts a relatively young tourist demographic, and the town has become popular for its nightlife. Ischgl’s skyline is dominated by newly built hotels, giving it a less authentic feel than most other villages and towns in Tyrol.

Austria Coronavirus since Reopening
16,843
Confirmed
672
Deaths
2
Deaths (24h)
4.0%
Deaths (%)
15,742
Recovered
25
Recovered (24h)
93.5%
Recovered (%)
429
Active
2.6%
Active (%)
  • Tourist Information (Tourismusverband Paznaun – Ischgl), Dorfstraße 43, , fax+43 50990 199 Monday to Friday 08:00-18:00, Sa 08:00-18:30, Su 09:00-12:00, 16:00-18:00All tourist information, including free maps of the Silvretta Arena and hiking maps in summer. Free.

History of Ischgl

Ischgl was founded in the 10th century as a farming village. For centuries there was no connection between the upper Inn Valley (Oberinntal) and the Paznaun Valley, and Ischgl’s only connection to civilization was through Vorarlberg, its most important trade partner. It was effectively an isolated outpost of Vorarlberg in Tyrol, and the name Ischgl literally means island in the local dialect, reflecting its isolation. Archduke Siegmund understood the difficulties faced by the young Alpine village, and allowed Ischgl to export cattle and import wheat duty free, which boosted its economy from the 1460s. From 1505, Ischgl was allowed to collect toll but in return was required to keep the trade route over the Jamtalferner glacier open. This proved to be difficult because of increased rock avalanches and the glacier breaking apart, and by the 18th century the glacier could no longer be traversed by horse, bringing trade almost to a standstill. An exodus followed in the 19th century as a result of the economic hardships brought by the decline in trade, and a famine struck Ischgl. Many villagers fled the famine, relocating to Bavaria or Swabia, and of those who decided to stay, many perished during the harsh winter months as there was insufficient manpower to cultivate enough food and harvest enough firewood.

The barren Paznaun Valley had little economic assets to offer, and unlike in neighbouring valleys, a railway connection was never established. The lack of a rail link cut off Ischgl from the rest of Tyrol and Vorarlberg during winter months, and inhibited expansion of the village which made recovery difficult.

Only by the end of the 19th century, when tourism generated a new source of income, Ischgl started to enjoy economic improvements. Between 1882 and 1889, several Austrian and German mountaineering clubs installed shelters and promoted tourism. Since the 1964, when the first Silvretta cable car opened to the public, Ischgl has transformed completely from a millennium of agriculture into a ski resort. With over 10.000 guest beds it is now one of the largest (by bed count) ski resorts in the Alps.

Get in

By bus

Bus 260 connects Ischgl once or twice per hour (depending on time of day) with the other towns and villages in the Paznaun Valley, all the way to . At the station, take bus 260 on platform C right across the station entrance. The journey to Ischgl takes ca. 52 minutes, and no transfers are needed. A ticket costs €7.40 when purchased in advance online. Get off at .

For long distance travel options, see Paznaun Valley.

By ski

Ischgl can be reached by ski from Samnaun in Switzerland, as their shared ski resort spans both towns across the border.

Get around

Ischgl is fairly small, so getting around by foot won’t be a problem. To reach the the western village Mathon, take bus 260 at Silvrettabahn direction Galtür and get off at Mathon Ost or Mathon West.

See

Museums

  • Ropeway Museum (Seilbahnmuseum), Dorfstr. 61, ,  W 16:00-19:00Since 2009 completely renovated, the Ropeway Museum offers visitors an insight in the history of ropeway technology from the 60s to the present, including one of the first gondolas. It also documents the founding period of the Silvrettaseilbahn AG, the company currently responsible for keeping the ski lifts in Ischgl going.
  • Mathias Schmid MuseumStöckwaldweg 33, . A small museum dedicated to painter Mathias Schmid, born in the Paznaun Valley. On display are numerous drawings, paintings, sketch books, documents, and memoralia connecting Schmid to the Paznaun Valley since 1851.

Churches and chapels

  • St. Nicholas Church (Pfarrkirche St. Nikolaus), Kirchenweg 7, ,  Church built in 1443 and consecrated as parish church in the 16th century. The Baroque church with Gothic tower is surrounded by a cemetery (German: Friedhof). The ceiling is richly decorated with frescoes from the hand of Anton Kirchebner, added in 1756 and documented by Josef Jais. The Baroque high altar is a design from Josef Georg Witwer, and installed between 1756 and 1757. Most of the paintings were only added in 1813 and created by Alois Grissemann.
  • Three Kings Chapel (Dreikönigskapelle), MathonerstrasseA Baroque chapel with circular apse and typical onion-shaped roof in Mathon includes a Madonna statue from the mid-17th century attributed to Michael Lechleitner.
  • St. Sebastian Church (St. Sebastian Expositurkirche), Kirchgasse, MathonBaroque church built in 1674 and consecrated in 1782 in honour of Saint Sebastian and Saint Rochus. Free.
  • Chapel of the Seven Sorrows of Mary (Kapelle Zu den 7 Schmerzen Mariens). The chapel lies in Unterpardatsch in the Fimber Valley (German: Fimbertal) and was rebuilt in 1833 on the site of a chapel dating from the 17th century. It is a two-bay chapel with circular apse and with onion dome on the roof. Decoration consists of numerous votive images from the 19th and 20th centuries. Free. 

Do

Winter sports

Ischgl’s most important attraction is its extensive winter sports facilities. With 239 km of slopes in all difficulty levels, Ischgl offers the largest ski resort in the Paznaun Valley. Skiers have access to reliable snow conditions from November until the beginning of May (although slopes at lower elevations are usually closed earlier). Unique for Ischgl is that skiers can cross the mountain ridge into Switzerland, with connections to Samnaun.

NameTel.Altitude30px / 30px / 30px30px / 30px / 30px
Silvretta Arena+43 50 990 1001377 – 2872 m41 Lifts: 7 / 25 / 9239 km Pistes: 47 / 143 / 49

The 3 lifts offering access to the ski resort are the  Fimbabahn, the  Silvrettabahn, and the  Pardatschgratbahn. Due to Ischgl’s popularity as a ski resort, long waiting lines can be expected at each of the 3 lifts as early as 08:00. Waiting times can be up to 1 hour, so it is recommended to either come before the morning rush, or sleep out and join the queue after 9:00. Tickets can be purchased at each of the 3 lifts.

Hamlet Mathon does not have a connection to the ski resort, but has its own  practice lift (German: Ubungslift) which can be accessed with any Ischgl skipass.

For those who can’t get enough of snow fun during the day, night sledging is an adventure on its own.

  • Night Sledging (Nachtrodeln), Paznaunstalstrasse, ,  M, Th 19:00-20:30A sledging track spanning most of the regular ski slope, including some fairly flat sections that require walking. Ascent is with the Silvrettabahn. Tickets for a single ascent cost €14 for adults and €8.50 for kids. Rental of a sleigh is separate at €9 for adults and €4.50 for kids, making the experience rather expensive since these prices only cover a single decent.

Water sports

  • Forest swimming pool (Freibad Waldbad), Waldbadweg 6, ,  June-August from 09:00-18:00, closed during bad weatherOutdoor swimming pool in the Stock Forest (Stockwald), with a 47 m long water slide. Open in summer months. Free entance with the Silvretta Card.
  • Silvretta CentreCenterweg 1, ,  10:00-22:00 dailyIndoor wellness and spa in the centre of Ischgl, with indoor swimming pool at 28°, waterfall, rapids, and different saunas. Adults €16, children €10.

Hiking

There are ample hiking opportunities around Ischgl in summer, with maps of marked hiking trails freely available in the tourist information centre. The Walk of Lyrics is among the nicest and best signposted hiking tours around Ischgl.

  • Bear Falls Suspension Bridge (Hängebrücke Bärenfalle). Steel suspension bridge over the Fimba Valley, with the Bear Falls underneath.

Radical sports

  • SkyFly, ,  10:00-16:00 dailyA 2 km long zipline starting at the Silvrettabahn Mittelstation, and finishing at the Pardatschgratbahn Talstation. There are 2 parallel tracks, making it possible to experience the flight with speeds up to 84 km/h with a friend or partner. Flight time is about 3 minutes, ca. 50 m above ground. €39 for SkyFly and €11.50 for a Silvrettabahn ascent for adults, €25 for Skyfly and €6.50 for Silvrettabahn ascent for kids..
  • RaftingStöckwaldweg 5, ,  An adrenaline activity with family or friends, rafting involves the descent of the Paznauner rapid rivers in an inflatable boat (raft) with an experienced guide helping in navigating the most difficult sections of the trajectory. You must be able to swim to participate. Recommended more in summer than in winter due to the temperature of the water.
  • CanyoningStöckwaldweg 5, ,  Follow the flow of Paznauner rapid rivers, guided by experienced locals. A canyoning tour involves the descent of white water streams in a neoprene suit, complete with helmet and safety gear, and includes climbing, swimming and jumping. Expect the waters to be ice cold, so mostly recommendable in summer.

Buy

  • MPREISSilvrettastraße 37, ,  Winter: Monday to Friday 7:30-19:30, Sa 7:40-18:00, So 15:00-19:00; Summer: Monday to Friday 7:40-20:00, Sa 7:40-18:00Decently sized supermarket with a selection of food and drinks, toiletry items, and most other stuff travellers would need.
  • BillaFlorianpl. 6, ,  Monday to Friday 7:15–19:30, Sa 7:15-18:00, Su 13:00-18:00Small supermarket close to the bus stop and ski lift, with mostly food, drinks, and snacks.
  • InterSportDorfstraße 31, ,  M-Sa 08:00-18:30, Su 08:00-18:00Sports store specialized in winter sports equipment, but also sells hiking equipment. Materials can also be rented.

Eat

  • Restaurant Hotel TirolDorfstraße 77, ,  A traditional restaurant with reasonably priced food and appropriately sized portions.

Drink

  • PachaMadleinweg 2, ,  One of the most popular night clubs in Ischgl.

Where to stay in Ischgl

Ischgl is a very popular destination for skiers in winter, and especially when snow is falling in abundant quantities, most accommodation will be full. It is recommended to book a hotel room as early as possible. There are very few, if any, AirBnB style facilities in Ischgl so don’t count on those as cheaper alternatives.

  • Hotel SolariaDorfstr. 39, ,  Check-in: 14:00-19:00, check-out: 07:00-10:00A homely hotel with good food.
  • SchlosshotelDorfstraße 85, ,  Luxury hotel in a renovated castle, with indoor and outdoor swimming pool, and nearly all other amenities guests would need. No single rooms, but if you’re willing to spend this much money, it could be considered for occasions like honeymoons etc. €350.
  • Hotel SeiblishofPasnatschweg 1, , fax+43 5444-5425-66 Check-in: 15:00-23:00, check-out: 07:00-11:00Posh hotel with extensive amenities for skiers, most popular in winter. €332.
  • Hotel YsclaDorfstr. 73, , fax+43 5444 5275-4 Family run hotel, and one of the cheaper accommodation options in Ischgl. €78 for single room.
  • Hotel MadleinMadleinweg 2, , fax+43 4718 590-310 Very posh hotel aimed at skiers. €250.
  • Hotel BrigitteOberer Kirchenweg 3, 6561 Ischgl, , fax+43 5444 5646-66 .

Stay safe due to the Coronavirus situation in Ischgl

In contrast to the ease with which the border between Austria and Switzerland can be crossed by ski, it is strictly forbidden to cross the border in the Fimba Valley with any kind of vehicle. Doing so risks prosecution, although the chance of being caught is very low because there is no formal border check point.

Go next

  • Paznaun Valley
Galtür — Alpine village that turns into a ski resort in winter, internationally known for the 1999 avalanche that almost completely wiped it of the map.

  • Kappl — picturesque Alpine village and ski resort to the north-east.
  • See — first town in the Paznaun Valley with impressive architectural heritage.
  • Landeck — transport hub in the Upper Inn Valley, famous for its castle.
  • St. Anton — one of the oldest and best ski resorts the Alps.
  • Samnaun — a Swiss town outside the Swiss customs area (making it a popular destination for duty-free shopping) which can be reached from Ischgl by ski.

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