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Kiel | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak

Wolfgang Holzem

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Kiel is the capital city of Schleswig-Holstein state in Germany and sits around 90 kms from Hamburg to the north, and is known as the ‘gateway to the Baltic’. Since it is right on the waterfront, this is a maritime city par excellence with all kinds of activities relating to sailing and water sports.

Germany | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak
3,238,054
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
81,693
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
2.5%
Deaths (%)
2,865,000
Recovered
19,700
Recovered (24h)
291,361
Active

History and Geography

Kiel sits on the Jutland peninsula on the shores of the Baltic Sea, and attracts international interest when it comes to sailing. It has hosted the sailing events for the Summer Olympics twice in the past, and is still home to the German Baltic Navy. The Kiel Fjord, said to be the busiest waterway in the entire world, is somewhat of a feather in the cap for Germany since it is entirely man made. Those who are looking to travel further afield can get to Sweden or Norway from this area. Cruise ships are in abundance too and they ply the Baltic Sea from one end to the other. The terrain is extremely flat so those who like to walk, hike or go by bicycle are well catered for here.

Kiel really took off more than one hundred years ago because of the busy shipping industry. The Second World War really hammered the place, so the rebuilding has a modern feel with plenty of open spaces. However, some of the old quarter is being reconstructed for historical purposes.

Best time to go

Much as any other European city, the warmer months fall between May and September. Winter months, between November and February, sees temperatures drop as low as freezing point. Rain falls more in the winter period but even in summer it can be a little unpredictable. However, it is seldom too hot, so summer is the ideal time for family holidays.

Getting around in Kiel

Since this is a port city, many visitors come in from Scandinavia and other northern European countries. Once landed, they can avail themselves of the very efficient trains and buses etc to get around the capital.

Kiel Hauptbahnhof, the main train station, stands next to the main bus terminus and is situated right in the middle of the shopping center. Travelers can ride into Hamburg or beyond by picking up connections on this line.

Buses take travelers as far as Poland and on to Estonia if they so wish or, for those coming into Kiel, take a bus from Berlin which takes around six hours. The nearest major airport is situated in Hamburg – about 100 kms away, but charters do fly on an irregular basis.

Buses and ferries in this port city ensure that the populace gets to where they should be. Taxis are expensive so many people opt to hire bicycles to get around.

Major Attractions and Sights

For those who like to meander around a museum or two, Kiel has an abundance of them. They sit on the edge of the Kiel Fjord and all have spectacular views. They uphold a tradition of being scientific, and each is reachable within one hour from the city centre.

One is full of old and ancient antiquities, with lovely examples of Grecian vases and urns on display. Another will house an aquarium which shows local sea life off to perfection. Kids will love the outdoor seal pool here as they can help to feed these adorable creatures.

In Kiel there is an art museum covering just about any genre, and they also display international artists throughout the year. The medicine museum is a must for anyone interested in how medicines were discovered, and the exhibits include old instruments and specimens.

There are more, covering anything from maritime history to a zoological museum, so it is hard to see how someone would not find something interesting here.

There are beaches galore in Kiel and walks that take visitors to the Friedrichsort cliffs. There are also things like the Botanical Gardens at the Christian Albrecht University Holstenstrasse and the quirky folding bridge called the Hörn to be visited around the town.

If traveling through Germany by car, a visit to St. Stephan’s Church in Mainz is a must at any time, but particularly around Christmas. It has some very fine examples of stained glass windows by Chagall, which were put in towards the end of the last century. See different scenes from the bible and wonder at his attempt to bring the Jewish people and Christians together through art. It is around 500 kms away, but it is a good spot for a weekend out of the capital.

One great way to enjoy the sights of Kiel is to take a walking tour starting from the New City Hall. Stroll past the library and take a look in the gallery, or just sit and rest up at a roadside café. Walking on to the Sophienhof shopping centre, there is plenty of time to buy up some souvenirs. Go over the footbridge and take a look at the historic but modernized railway station where Kaiser Wilhelm II once held court. It seems that at every turn there is a breathtaking vista of industry and water coming together, so do not forget to bring a camera for some free souvenirs.

For history buffs, and for those who remember the movie ‘Das Boot’, viewing submarines in the flesh, so to speak, must be an exciting thing to do. Visitors are allowed to walk through the one surviving submarine left over from the Second World War. There is an underground memorial to the fallen men from this war with some rather interesting details of the German Navy and its history.

Since Hamburg is not very far away, a night or two here is also possible. Hamburg used to be famous for the swinging sixties style music and its red light district. The red light district is still there, but is not meant for the children of course.

Again for history buffs, those that know about the mass migration of people from Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth century may like to visit the Ballinstadt complex in Hamburg. Five million people took the plunge to the ‘New World’ back then and all the halls and venues that processed them are still standing in situ. Those that are studying their ancestry can check out the world’s biggest genealogical database to see if they can find any clues.

Another great place to visit out of Kiel is Lubeck near Hamburg. This place came into being in 1143 and the old town actually sits on an island. The beauty of this place is obvious and it is the very first centre to be registered as a World Heritage site. It is great for tourists since they can walk around the whole place in just one day to look at all the medieval sites. Anyone who is into German history will certainly need to visit here.

It has six churches including the extremely unique St. Mary’s where a bell broke the floor after a bombing during the war. The bell is still there for all to see and is now a memorial to that time when the world was at war. The towers were so weakened by the barrage of bombs that they actually bend in the middle!

Lubeck is very famous for its marzipan and these little delicacies certainly make for good souvenirs to give as gifts. Try the marzipan nut cake before wrapping up some to take home!

Lubeck is also on the waterfront so it has many ancient and interesting buildings to see. There are the old city gates called the Burgtor and a wonderful old abbey called the Kulturforum Burgklster. For those who are tired by this stage, take a canal boat tour so that the sites pass by as the boat sails serenely along.

For those who want to glimpse into the history of the Hanseatic League, Lubeck should certainly be one place to visit, to see how people struggled for freedom, while staying in Kiel.

Shopping in Kiel

There is a whole range of shops in the Holstenstraße pedestrian area. Also, take a look at the Sophienhof area. Citti-Park is also popular and there is a giant Ikea shop here for those who like very stylish furniture.

There are designer shops for quality clothing, up-market electronics shops and other pricey outlets that offer jewelry and quality goods dotted all through the malls and shopping centers. These tend to be scattered all around the edge of the water so don’t be surprised to have a towering cruise ship keeping pace alongside. Specialist shops and those aimed specifically at tourists abound. However, for something a little different, and perhaps something with some more local color, take a fifteen minute stroll from the city center to the ‘Holtenau Arcades’ which is full of shops, cafes and bars etc. This is where weekender locals like to hang out, so for a taste of local culture, this is the place to be.

Eating out in Kiel

Those who love food and drink are in for a treat, and they should certainly visit the International Market along the Rathausmarkt to try some delicacies. Look for the Kieler Nachrichten (newspaper) on Saturdays to find out what is going on and what is being offered.

It is said that the best German/Turkish Döner kebabs are sold in the Garips Imbiss on the Metzstrasse and Wörthstrasse. Or, for those with plainer tastes, the Kartoffel Keller sells anything with potato in it. Even pizzas with potato are sold here but there is a good gathering of coffee shops, pubs, bars and cafés selling all kinds of interesting tidbits. The Café Louf near the Reventloubrücke is the place to be on the weekends since they serve up a delicious breakfast buffet at this time. It too looks over the water, so is a great meeting place on Sundays in particular.

One delicacy that must not be missed is the kieler sprotten, the local dish made from sprats straight from the ocean.

A large number of Thai and Arabian restaurants are also dotted all over Kiel.

Nightlife in Kiel

There are many clubs in Kiel, but the locals prefer to head out of town towards Hamburg for their fun. However, for those who stay in town, there is still plenty to do. Most clubs have a five Euro fee to enter, so think carefully before hopping from one place to another.

Luna, at the Bergstraße sometimes has international DJs performing and visitors should expect to pay more on these nights. Music changes from Ragga to Soul/Funk and electronic tunes so there should be something for everyone to enjoy.

Look out for the Prinz Willy Café on Lutherstrasse 9. This is described as a ‘creative’ joint that has live bands, poetry readings and anything to do with the arts going on.

Anything of local interest

One cannot visit Kiel in late June and avoid Kiel Week. Apart from the swelling crowds which take the quarter of a million local people’s numbers up to more than three million, there is so much to see and do at this time. Especially prominent is the display of tall ships that come into harbor for the regatta.

Kiel Week has been said to be the biggest sailing event in the entire world and the whole town is decked out to show the world what it can produce in the way of food and entertainment. There are craft fairs going on, superstar entertainers appearing nightly, kids’ entertainment and many open air concerts to chill out at. These don’t go past around eleven at night, but then the parties start up in indoor venues or the Eggerstedtstrasse.

One odd place to see on the popular guided walk of Kiel is the Asmus-Bremer-Platz. There is a large model of the eponymous man and woman under the tree here, and is meant to remind people of the former Mayor and his wife. These two came to office in 1702 and there is a folk festival every year in their honor. See men wearing the oddly shaped trousers that he wore in his day leading up to the weekend when the festival goes on.

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Former founder of Asiarooms.com and now reporting mainly on the Asia Pacific region and the global Coronavirus crises in countries such as Thailand, Germany & Switzerland. Born near Cologne but lived in Berlin during my early teenage years. A longterm resident of Bangkok, Udon Thani, Sakon Nakhon and Phuket. A great fan of Bali, Rhodes & Corfu. Now based on Mallorca, Spain.

Germany

Magdeburg | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak

Wolfgang Holzem

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Magdeburg in northern Germany was founded by Charlemagne in 805AD, making it 1,200 years old. Its original name was Magadoburg, probably from German for big, ‘magado’, and ‘burga’ for fortress. Emperor Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, lived in the town for most of his reign and was buried in the cathedral after his death. Over the centuries, it has been ravaged by war and destruction as a result of its position as an imperial seat, Prussian fortified town, and as a Hanseatic city.  It was heavily bombed in the Second World War, and a RAF bombing raid on the night of 16 January 1944 destroyed most of the city.

Germany | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak
3,238,054
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
81,693
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
2.5%
Deaths (%)
2,865,000
Recovered
19,700
Recovered (24h)
291,361
Active

1990 saw the city become the capital of the new state of Saxony-Anhalt in the reunification of Germany, with the city center rebuilt in a modern style. After reunification, most of the basis of the economy was shut down, and it faced decline in the population as a result of people seeking lucrative jobs in western Germany.  The city however, is known for reinventing itself, and for preserving its cultural heritage. Today it is a beautiful city on the Elbe River with its economy geared towards services, and hosting nearly 20 000 students at its top rated two universities, as well as research centers. It has great sights, including its parks which make it the third greenest city in Germany, and new shopping malls and other attractions; and its proximity to Hamburg, Leipzig and Berlin counts in its favor too.

The Best Time to Go

The best months are between May and September, where the temperature averages between 10 and 20°C (50 to 68°F); although in July and August it can get up to 24°C (75°C).  The months from October to April are colder, averaging between 0 and 10°C (32 to 50°F) . The coldest time of year is in January, when it can get as low as -2.1°C (28°F).

Sunshine hours are from 1.3 hours a day in December and 7.7 hours a day in June. July is the wettest month, experiencing rain, sleet, hail or snow over an average of 14 days. Frost mostly occurs in January.

Getting Around in Magdeburg

With regard to public transportation, there are S-Bahn trains, buses, trams and ferries in Magdeburg. The benefit is that they are all unified in a linked transport system called Marego, so they all use the same tickets.

Riding the tram is probably the best system for tourists to use, as the stops are located at the main attractions, and in busy areas. Magdeburg boats 10 tram lines, plus one which is brought into service during heavy traffic times, or for special events. Waiting times vary greatly, and depend on the time, day, and location. In the city centre you rarely have to wait more than 5 minutes, even on a Sunday; while the further out you go, you can wait for between 10 and 20 minutes. Timetables are provided at every stop. If you’re lucky, you might catch a communist-era one, and experience the rattles of the past.

The buses run every 20 minutes, and cover all areas of the city. As with the trams, extra buses are laid on at heavy traffic times and special events. Timetables are at every stop too.

Two ferry services operate Elbe river crossings, the Fähre Buckau and the Fähre Westerhüsen. They run from March to October on Tuesdays to Sundays between 10am and 6pm.

The main train line runs through Magdeburg from the north to the south. The train stations are marked with a logo of a white S on a green circle. The trains run every 30 minutes, and are the fastest method for crossing the city.

Public transportation at night means you need to look at the schedules, as it is more limited. Taxis are of course an alternative.

Major Attractions and Sights

The Gothic Magdeburger Dom (Cathedral of St. Maurice and St Catherine) is the most well-known sight of the city. It was constructed on the site of a Roman cathedral between the years of 1209 and 1520. It is the highest church building in eastern Germany at 104 meters. It has stunning and unique sculptures, notably the ‘Twelve Virgins’ at the northern gate.

The 11th Century Romanesque abbey Kloster unser lieben Frauen (Cloister of Our beloved Lady) is an iconic building in Germany. Among other things, it has an art gallery.
Johanniskirche (St John’s Church) is worth going to see. After sustaining serious damage during WWll it has been recently rebuilt as a multipurpose centre.

The Town Hall dates from 1698. It stands in the place of the original which stood on the marketplace since the 13th Century until its destruction in the Thirty Years’ War. The ‘new’ building was built in the Renaissance style. It has since been renovated, and was reopened in 2005.

In the city centre near the Kloster Unser Lieben Frauen and the cathedral is the Grüne Zitadelle (Green Citadel), a pink house designed by the famous architect Friedensreich Hundertwasser. There are also ruins of the stronghold of the Prussian Empire.

The Kulturhistorisches Museum (Culture Historical Museum) on Otto-von-Guericke-Straße is home to the famous statue, the Magdeburger Reiter.

The city center overall, is a delight for architecture fans, and features some neo-classicist buildings dating from the Communist era, as well as modern marvels built since reunification.

Magdeburg is one of the greenest cities in Europe and the third greenest city in Germany, so riding a bike in Magdeburg is a pleasant experience. Since most of the streets have cycle tracks on the sides you will not have any problems with taking your bike into the city. You are permitted to take your bike with you on all the public transportation; however, you may have to purchase an extra ticket for the bike. A very nice way to explore the idyllic nature in and around Magdeburg is using the Elberadweg. This cycle path leads you all the way along the river Elbe and invites you to explore the unique biosphere reserve around Magdeburg. Signs guide you along the path and show you directions and distances to other towns, villages, and attractions. Many restaurants and beer gardens are right next to the river, as well as some nice hotels, playgrounds and parks.

There are several different river cruises offered by the Magdeburger Weiße Flotte GmbH.
They include: a 1.5 hour cruise along the skyline of Magdeburg; a river cruise from the city centre to the town of Schönebeck; an evening cruise; and cruises along the waterway. Tickets can be bought at the tourist information centre, or onboard.

In recent years, the museums in Magdeburg have regularly featured excellent exhibitions on a whole host of subjects related to art, culture and learning. New collections and exhibitions have also been established and the top-flight Technology Museum has opened with no expense or effort spared. The three other major museums are the Cultural History Museum, the Museum of Natural History and the Art Museum in the Convent of our Lady.

Magdeburg also offers high-caliber entertainment at its opera house, Schauspielhaus theatre and puppet theatre, and there are many independent theatre groups and German-style cabaret performances to enjoy.

In the Elbauen Park the Millennium Tower is a popular draw card; it houses an exhibition on nature and the history of humanity.

The Magdeburg Water Bridge is a navigable aqueduct in Germany that connects the Elbe-Havel Canal to the Mittelland Canal, and allows ships to cross over the Elbe River. At 918 meters, it is the longest navigable aqueduct in the world. Construction of the water link was started as early as in the 1930s, but due to WWII and subsequent division of Germany the work remained suspended till 1997. The aqueduct was finally completed and opened to the public in 2003. It truly is a sight worth seeing.

Shopping in Magdeburg

With 2.5 square meters of retail space per inhabitant, Magdeburg’s city-centre shopping area is one of Germany’s top destinations for shoppers.

There are numerous shopping malls all over the city. In the CBD you have Karstadt, which was a mall during the cold war and is therefore the oldest of the city with its building still representing socialist architecture. After the reunification, the city center got several new shopping malls. The biggest of them is called Allee Centre and has 3 floors. Also located in the city center are the Ulrichshaus and the City Carré. You will also find numerous stores (as well as bars and cafés) along the road Breiter Weg, which used to be one of the largest shopping streets in Europe before WWII and has now regained most of its popularity with modern architecture.

Strolling along Magdeburg’s traditional shopping boulevards Breiter Weg and Ernst-Reuter-Allee, visiting the many shops in the districts of Neustadt and Sudenburg as well as weekly markets will yield some local goods.  The city’s most centrally located market is at the Old Market (Alter Markt) in front of the Town Hall. Market days and times are Tuesday to Friday, 9am to 5pm and on Saturday, 9am to 1pm. The market is closed on Mondays. Special attractions are the so-called “Farmers’ Market” which takes place every Tuesday as well as the “Green Market” every Saturday. Produce on sale includes: homemade sausages and cold cuts, fresh fruit and vegetables, flowers, dairy products, cakes and pastries, poultry products, household supplies, lingerie, gifts, and textiles.

If you feel hungry or peckish, there are a number of snack stands offering light meals and snacks to accommodate your needs. Easy access is provided by public transport, and parking places are available in Julius-Bremer-Strasse as well as behind the Karstadt building.

Eating Out in Magdeburg

Hasselbachplatz square and the surrounding streets are lined with dozens of pubs, bars and restaurants plus one of the best-known currywurst bars in Germany, ‘Curry 54’. The Mediterranean restaurant Liebig is popular with all walks and ages. The trendy bar-café-restaurant has a large outdoor terrace, and serves substantial breakfasts, global fare and cool cocktails.

Bingöl Grill on Breiter Weg is a budget legend to lovers of Turkish food and Döner. Clean, with decent service, real silverware, porcelain plates and prices that rival big fast food chains. It’s open until late at night, making it ideal if you need to grab something solid after a night of partying.

Several Thai and Vietnamese restaurants are available.

Nightlife in Magdeburg

The Hasselbachplatz is the place to start a night out in Magdeburg. Here you will find a big variety of bars and small clubs, a lot of stylish bars and also alternative pubs with long opening hours on weekends.

A premium spot is the Jackelwood, located in the Sternstraße just south from the Hasselbachplatz, with billiards, kicker and a lot of other games. There are quite a few more bars on this area so check them out and you will find one that appeals to you. And you will always get something to eat at the Hasselbachplatz. For very late night drinking pop in at the COCO in the Otto-von-Guericke-Street (50m) from Hasselbachplatz

An amazing night at the theatre – with a difference! – can be had at the fabulous Theater an der Angel. The company is owned by Matthias Engle and Ines Lacroix who performed in the Neil Simon comedy Der letzte der feurigen Liebhaber.

Of local Interest

In the Elbauen Park at Easter, you can go along and watch a huge bonfire of firewood. A snowman made at Magdeburg’s theatre workshops is placed on top, and the lighting of the bonfire is said to be banishing winter from the park.

Hassel Night Line takes place on the Hasselbachplatz – a twice-a-year street festival with open-air stages and music on every narrow street.

September 2011 saw the inception of the Kaiser Otto Festival.

September also sees the popular annual summer theatre at the Puppet Theatre in the courtyard, which combines puppet shows and theatre plays.

In October is the Magdeburg Town Festival. On the ‘festival mile’ you’ll find show stands, market stalls, carousels and different stage programs by many entertainers, including from regional TV and radio stations. The ‘mile’ runs from the cathedral to University Square.

Also in October is the Magdeburg marathon.

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Germany

Erfurt | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak

Wolfgang Holzem

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Erfurt is one of the oldest German settlements and it dates back to the prehistoric area. Traces of human remains have been found in the city dating back to 100,000 BC. It’s the capital of the Thuringia region and has a colorful history having experienced being a part of the French Empire, the Prussian Empire, and the Electorate of Mainz.

Germany | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak
3,238,054
Confirmed
0
Confirmed (24h)
81,693
Deaths
0
Deaths (24h)
2.5%
Deaths (%)
2,865,000
Recovered
19,700
Recovered (24h)
291,361
Active

Erfurt is the city closest to the geographical heart of modern Germany, enjoying a location on rolling plains. Whilst the city itself is decisively urban, the surroundings retain a charming and rustic identity where traditional rural life is evident. In the Middle Ages, the city was a highly important trading town, and many of the old buildings and market areas are still standing and in use today. A mark of its antique significance is its university which was founded in 1379, and where Martin Luther was a student.

Best Time to go to Erfurt

Temperatures range widely in Erfurt. For those who love the harsh, cold winters of Germany visit Erfurt in January or December as the temperatures drop below freezing. Bargain breaks in winter are attractive to those that love the crispness in the air and the lack of tourists. If there happens to be snow, the forests of Thuringia, outside the city, are certainly a very pretty sight.

In the summer, temperatures generally hover around the 70 degrees Fahrenheit mark, at their height. It’s never unbearably hot and wandering the pretty streets and parks of Erfurt is very pleasurable.

Getting around

As the capital of the region, driving into Erfurt is a viable option if you are travelling around Germany. It lies on two large federal motorways in the north and the east, so there are four main ways into the city. It’s strongly recommended you avoid the city centre. Not only is it difficult to get directly to your destination, it’s almost impossible to find a parking space.

A large train station sits close to the centre of the city, with direct lines to other major cities like Dresden and Berlin. It’s possible to use Erfurt as a base to explore some of the other major cities in the area – Leipzig is an hour away, Weimar just about 15 minutes and Halle, the birthplace of Handel and the home of some lovely castles, can be reached in about 45 minutes. The Erfurt Hauptbahnhof offers local trains going to the smaller towns in the Thuringia region.

The Erfurt-Weimar Airport services the region and offers daily flights around Germany, as well as to prominent holiday destinations around Europe. If you are just flying into the city there are trams offering a direct connection to the train station and city center. Take tram number 4.

Unlike many tourist destinations, it’s unwise to opt for transport around the city centre. Since the centre of the city is the oldest part, the streets are naturally extremely narrow. Walking is definitely the best way to get around central Erfurt

The tram lines are amongst the most advanced in Europe. Erfurt has had a long time to make their tram system one of the best in the world as it’s been in place since 1883. Trolleybuses act as a supplement to the tram system and enable you to get where you need to go quickly and easily.

Transport generally grinds to a relative halt after midnight, but there are night buses every hour for people who need to get to the train station, or the center of the city. If this isn’t ideal, the only other option is to take advantage of a taxi, which visitors say are quite expensive.

Cycling is perfectly acceptable in Erfurt’s narrow streets. Expect to see a lot of cyclists around the city center as it’s generally the fastest way to get around.

Major Attractions and Sights

Find your way around the city with a guidebook from the tourist office which is located on Benediktsplatz in the city center. Erfurt’s romantic Old Quarter is Germany’s largest heritage site so lovers of history and architecture will find much of interest here.

The city’s narrow streets are an attraction all their own, harkening back to Erfurt’s historical past. Many central streets are open to pedestrians only, and are lined by delightful old merchant’s houses, many of them tall with brightly colored facades. A number of green areas with charming little bridges crossing the Gera River complete the distinctive northern European look and flavor.

The Erfurt Cathedral is an old 13th century Catholic church built by St. Boniface. It evolved into a church in the gothic style and now possesses beautiful stained-glass windows, a candelabrum shaped in the form of a bronze man, and choir stalls dating back to the 14th century. If you visit the city in August you can witness the Domstufen-Festspiele classical music festival which takes place in the square in front of the cathedral.

Severikirche, a huge 5-naved church known to date back to before the 12th century stands next door to the cathedral and together the two dominate the cityscape, making them the most well known attractions of Erfurt.

The Alte Synagoge is another exciting attraction for history buffs. Its roots date back to the 12th century, which makes it perhaps the oldest Jewish synagogue in Europe. In the 14th century, it was converted into a storehouse before being left to ruin for many years. It was eventually refurbished and now stands as a museum. Learn about the history of this exciting monument and the people who worshipped here with a visit to the museum. One of its exciting exhibits is the 600 pieces of jewelry unearthed in the Jewish quarter, including a Jewish marriage ring dating back to the early 1300s.

The Zitadelle Petersberg sits on the hill north of the Dom, and is the most well preserved town baroque fortress in central Europe. It is a unique example of European fortress construction built on the site of a former Benedictine monastery. Guided tours of the underground passages are always popular.

Another of the significant and actually quite remarkable sights of Erfurt is the Krämerbrücke. This medieval bridge sits across the River Breitstrom and originally had a church at each end. Today the Agidienkirche still functions as a church. The bridge was built in 1325 and is covered with 32 buildings, all of which are still inhabited.

Martin Luther, the founder of Protestantism, studied in Erfurt as a student and lived there as a monk in the early 16th century. If you want to learn more about Martin Luther – one of the most important figures in European religious history – the must-visits are the old university buildings, the Augustinekloster (monastery), Georgenburse (student’s living quarters), and the Luther Stone. Guided tours of the city always include much reference to him and his associations with Erfurt.

Other buildings that might be included on an itinerary are the impressive Town Hall, the Former Governors Residence (dating from 1711) which is now the Thuringia Chancellery, St. Barthelomew’s Tower, and the Woad Storehouse, where once the blue dye was made.

The Egapark is a place to take a break from the busyness of the city center. The large botanical gardens are a romantic location and there are greenhouses featuring beautiful little plants, a Japanese rock garden, and even a horticultural museum with fantastic views of the whole garden from the top floor.

The Erfurt Theatre has recently been renovated and plays host to a variety of exciting operas and plays. Look at the official website of the theatre for more information on what’s on. Remember to book in advance to view some of the more popular shows to avoid disappointment as they tend to sell out quickly.

Shopping in Erfurt

Anger 1 is in the city centre and is a grand shopping mall spanning four floors. Expect to find many common chains inside Anger 1, including clothing stores, electronics chains, and groceries.

Thüringenpark, Nordhäuser Straße is open every day from 10am to 8pm, except Sunday. This is another shopping centre just outside the city centre. It contains a post office, drug store, and even a German bank. It’s always worth a visit during the city’s holidays as special events and themes are always held here.

Within the city itself there are plenty of local stores to take advantage of. The Krämerbrücke is the main place to purchase souvenirs as local artists and craftspeople sell their wares on small stalls and in small shop windows. It’s a small sanctuary away from the massive apparel corporations dominating Erfurt’s shopping scene.

The best time for shopping is definitely in December, when Wenigemarkt is taken over by the Christmas Market. Enjoy traditional crafts, street entertainment, wonderfully intricate Christmas decorations and plenty of warming drinks and snacks.

Eating out in Erfurt

Erfurt is a great place to sample some of Germany’s national foods. The famous Thuringia Bratwurst is sold throughout the city.

Before embarking on a trip to a local restaurant in Erfurt, take note tipping isn’t a mandatory practice. If you can’t spare an extra few Euros don’t worry about it. Most servers are more than happy if their customers simply round-up their meal to the nearest Euro. Of course, if the service and the meal were particularly scrumptious don’t be afraid to give them a larger tip.

Lovers of traditional Thuringia foods should visit Feuerkugel in the centre of Erfurt where the menu is eminently affordable. Visitors report how the restaurant has an extremely friendly atmosphere with helpful and welcoming servers. Expect to find potato casserole, bratwurst, and of course, German beer to wash your meal down with.

Übersee is a small café and bar located on the banks of the Gera River. It’s the perfect location for a bite to eat during a long day of sightseeing. As well as traditional German drinks, the café offers a different special every day.

FAM (Feines am Markt) is the ideal option if you want good food without any of the fuss. On the outside it looks like an unremarkable location, but the food more than makes up for it. The breakfasts have been reported as a marvel to behold.

A large number of Asian Restaurants are in the city center of Erfurt including Kebab and Arabic restaurants.

Nightlife in Erfurt

Erfurt offers plenty of evening entertainment with small bars and loud clubs, mostly located in the city center.

Engelsburg is an interesting venue as there are so many sides of it to experience. Relax with a beer in the Steinhaus pub, dance in the medieval cellar or visit the Café DuckDich upstairs, where avid culture lovers discuss the latest developments in the art world.

Musikpark deserves a visit purely on the basis of its special offers. It normally plays rock and house music, but on Thursdays, there’s free entry until midnight and if you pay 6 Euros you can drink as much as you like. Weekends are themes, changing every week and the ti me to enjoy an extensive list of cocktails.

A visit to Hemingway adds a touch of sophistication to a night out in Erfurt. Personal drawers with cigar humidors are given to each visitor. There are 148 types of rum and an unbeatable range of 30 daiquiri cocktails. In the Africa Lounge there are stuffed elephants and other animals. Feel as if you’ve just stopped off from a safari at a local inn with some authentic African music to go along with it. This is truly an atmosphere like no other!

Of local Interest

You might notice that there are a lot of steeples in Erfurt with no churches? This is because they were demolished to build the dominating Zitadelle Petersberg.

Erfurt is such a historically rich city because the bombing campaigns of World War II largely avoided the city. It’s meant where many historical attractions from the middle ages were destroyed elsewhere in Germany, Erfurt remained relatively untouched.

Erfurt holds quite a grizzly reputation as being the place where the JA Topf & Sons crematoria manufacturer created special ovens for use by the Nazis in death camps like Auschwitz-Birkenau. A memorial and museum to the victims of the Holocaust now stands in the place of the company’s former headquarters.

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Germany

Hannover | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak

Wolfgang Holzem

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Hannover is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony, Germany and was once the family seat of the Hannoverian Kings of Great Britain, known as the dukes of Brunswick- Lüneburg. It lies on the river Leine and was founded in mediaeval times as a village of ferrymen and fishermen that grew to become quite a large town in the 13th Century, by virtue of its geography on a natural crossroads. Its position on the river helped increase its value as a trading town.

Germany | Covid-19 Travel Restrictions | Lockdown | Coronavirus Outbreak
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Confirmed (24h)
81,693
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2.5%
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Active

Its crucial position became unfortunate as WWII blew through Europe, making it a prime target for strategic bombing of its railhead and production centre, as well as its important road junction. Residential areas were targeted too: more than 6,000 people were killed in the Allied bombing raids. In the aftermath, more than 90% of the city centre was destroyed by 88 bombing raids. The Aegidienkirche has been left as a ruin and today stands as a war memorial. The Allies marched into Hannover in April 1945, and the US 84th Infantry Division took the city on 10 April 1945. Inmates were released from the Neuengamme concentration camp. Hannover fell under British occupation, and became part of the new state of Lower Saxony in 1946.

Hannover’s landscape is quite flat, with the river Leine snaking through the city. It has large green areas, with big parks and forests. The Maschsee (Masch Lake) is a spectacular man-made lake.

Best time to go to Hannover

Hannover is a great place to be any time of the year, but the summer months are the best time to go. With an average temperature of 23°C (73°F), the whole city is in great spirits, celebrating lots of festivals, and hosting numerous events. Mind the frequent showers though! July is the hottest month; although far from unbearable.

The months between May and October are the most popular tourist-wise. The winter months are cold, and the deepest winter months see the temperatures dropping below freezing.

Getting Around

English translation was just recently introduced to some official tourist points such as the train ticket machines. The German people are generally helpful, but you have to ask for assistance, as they don’t tend to intrude upon others. For general information, it’s best to go to the Tourist Office.

Hannover’s public transportation network is superb. If you plan more than one mode of transport, a day ticket is the best buy, giving you unlimited travel on the bus, the trams and the subways; they are valid until the last connection of the day, which is often sometime after midnight. Be aware that some tickets need to be validated (stamped in the blue box), and some not, depending on the machine. Most of the city falls under Zone 1, so that should be the only one you need. Keep in mind that getting to the airport requires a Zone 2 ticket.

The city can be enjoyed on foot, with pedestrian paths on every street, as well as the area in front of Central Station. Bike paths are also provided on almost every street. You can take a bike on the busses and trams for free, but it’s restricted to 8.30am – 3pm, and after 7pm.

Taxis are also an alternative means of transport; at a higher rate of course. If you’re travelling in a group, you can order a 7 or 9 seat taxi, and so divide the cost effectively.

Major Attractions and Sights

Hannover is not a typical European city. Beautiful centuries-old buildings are here no more. The city was one of the hardest hit during World War II, leaving it with few historical landmarks. Even the Old City (Altstadt) area is ‘new’; all the old houses, about 40, left standing after the war were gathered from throughout the city and collected in one place. Around that area are grey 1950s buildings that are quite dreary. However, there are still a few residential neighborhoods just outside the downtown area, such as Oststadt, List, and Linden consisting of late-19th-century houses with often elaborate facades.

The Old City has points of interest, including the Market Church, the Nolte House, the Beguine Tower, Leibnitz House, and the Old Town Hall. The Kreuz-Church quarter has many little lanes to meander down.

Kröpcke is a large pedestrian area in the heart of Hannover. It is Hannover’s major shopping spot, home to the Opera house, and has lots of places to eat.

Passing through the Marstall Gate you come to the banks of the Leine, and happen upon the renowned Mile of Sculptures of which the Nanas of Niki de Saint-Phalle form a part of. Following the river bank along the Mile, you can cross the Königsworther Square to the entrance of the Georgengarten. From here, you can follow on to the Reformed Church, the Catholic Church of St Clemens, and Lutheran Neustädter Kirche.

Other popular sights to see in the city are: the Wangenheim Palace, the Kröpcke Clock, the Gehry Tower (by American architect Frank Gehry), the Waterloo Column, the Hannover Playhouse, the Lower Saxony State Archives, and the Opera House. The historically important Leibnitz Letters, which are on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register, are housed in the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz Library.

The Great Garden of Herrenhausen (Herrenhäuser Gärten) is a world-famous baroque garden created in the 17th Century to copy the Versailles Gardens in France. In the winter its beauty is still evident, but it reaches its best at the end of spring until the end of summer.
Also in the Herrenhausen Gardens you will find the Sea Life Grossaquarium. It has around 30 different displays, including a deep water tank which has a glass tunnel running through the centre, so you can walk through it and get really up close with the sharks and other big fish in the tank. It’s an indoor location, so if the weather is playing up, this beautiful aquarium is the ideal place to while away a rainy day.

Further out is the EXPO-Park, which hosted EXPO 2000. Crossing the Exponale, one of the biggest pedestrian bridges in Europe you’ll find the fairground complex.

The Hannover Zoo is a must-see; being one of the best and most spectacular in Europe. It has multi-themed areas including a farm, a jungle palace, a tropical house, a wooded area for wolves, a gorilla mountain, and many others. Annual visitors number around 2 million.

For general leisure activities, choose from forests and gardens, rivers, a canal and lakes, and 40 parks. In this bustling city there is a myriad of options to choose from, to suit any tastes.

Shopping in Hannover

Next to central Station is a large mall, the Ernst August Gallerie, as well as a supermarket inside the station, Lidl, which is open on Sundays. Kaufland is also nearby. The large department stores Karstadt and Galeria Kaufhof are in Kröpcke, as is Hugendubel, which sells English books. For sports equipment, look at Karstadt Sport and SportScheck. Rossmann and Douglas sell body care products, while Horstman & Sander in Kröpcke has great leather goods and top quality bags, from a coin purse to a large suitcase. The Galerie Luise is an upmarket boutique.

There is a flea market along the Leine every Saturday from 7am to 4pm. Watch out for overpriced ‘antiques’, and pickpockets. Souvenirs of Hannover can be bought from the Tourism Office.

Eating Out in Hannover

In most cafés and small restaurants, paying individually is accepted, as Germans like this system. Tips are not compulsory but most people do. In smaller cafés, if paying separately, rounding up to the next full euro is common; in bigger restaurants, 10% is best.

For traditional German fare, try Café Mezzo, Satluss, Schöneberger, Wurst-Basar (said to have the best German sausages, it has several stalls throughout the city), Das kleine Museum (stuffed crocodiles on the roof!), and Bavarium, a Bavarian restaurant.

The food stalls in the Market Hall are worth a visit.

Hannover caters to many types of international fare, and varies from wraps, fish and chips, to Thai, Vietnamese fare.

Nightlife in Hannover

For high-end DJs and live performances, Eve Klub, which was voted one of the Best 50 Clubs in Germany by the magazine Maxim in 2004 is a sure bet.

Osho Discothek has a 90m2 dance floor to dance the night away on.

Brauhaus Ernst-August is a nightclub that serves food too, as well as freshly-brewed beer. Join in with dancing on the tables; it’s a common sight here.

Heartbreak Hotel on Reuter Street is one of the newer nightclubs. It stays open until dawn.
Sansibar on Scholvin Street has music spanning the 60s, 70s and 80s.

As the beer gardens are an essential part of the Hannover nightlife, here are a few:
Waterloo Biergarten, Waterloo takes its name from being close to Waterloo square and on Waterloo Road. It is a huge beer garden surrounded by trees, and is very busy during the summer. It opens daily from 11am.

The Uni-Biergarten, is a relaxing beer garden in the midst of the city. Students and professors meet or go to have a drink. Food is available. It’s open from: 11am to midnight.

Und der Böse Wolf on Heese Street’s owner is a Hannover football supporter, so it gets full of football followers. It serves Thai food from 5pm every day.

Lister Turm Biergarten on Waldersee Street is one of the largest beer gardens in Hannover. With the Lister building as a backdrop as well as all the trees, it makes this an idyllic drinking spot. It is family friendly and business savvy as there is a playground for children and WiFi for laptops. The pub also serves food if you’re hungry or need a break from drinking.

Of local interest

The CeBIT is the biggest computer-related exhibition in the world and takes places over several days in March. It is held in the EXPO area.

In May the Masala World-beat Festival has musicians from around the world play in several spots throughout the city; it’s an annual event in spring/summer, as well as the International Fireworks festival. Hannoverians love their fireworks, and there are also fireworks every night of the Kleines Fest, every weekend during the Spring Festival, and on the weekend of the Lake Masch Festival.

In spring, the Münchenerhalle at the fairground is worth a look, being a huge Bavarian-style restaurant. The Hannover Messe is an industrial expo held in spring.

The Kleines Fest is held in summer has 30 to 40 international performers such as clowns, comedy theatre, acrobatic performances, etc. Each performance schedule lasts around 4 hours (from 6 to 10.30pm). As mentioned above, fireworks bring each day to a great conclusion. It is recommended to start queuing early, as much as 2 hours before the time.

The Lake Maschsee Festival is held around the lake in summer. The Reincarnation Parade is a one-day street techno party, on a smaller scale of Berlin’s Love Parade.

There is the open-air theatre in Herrenhausen’s Great Garden, with its programme of enchanting summer musicals.

Also in summer is the Rubber Duck Race, for the kiddies. Hundreds of rubber duckies ‘race’ on the Leine River; you can buy your own numbered one before the qualification race. The race starts at the Lower Saxon State parliament and ends at the Marstall Bridge.

October sees the biggest festival – Oktoberfest! It’s held on the Schützenplatz, and is the second biggest Oktoberfest in the world. Party on!

The Christmas markets are held in front of Central Station, in Kröpcke, in Altstadt, and in List. They start at the end of November and last until a few days before Christmas. The best stalls are said to be the Finnish stands in Altstadt, serving very good herring, smoked salmon, and reindeer meat. Their Glühwein is said to be the best too.

The Winter Zoo at Hannover Zoo is a great seasonally-themed place to visit. From the end of November until the middle of January you can enjoy ice skating, ice shows, slides as well as good food and drink to keep you warm.

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