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Sustainable Tourism & Fair Travel – Crisis is Changing our Vacation

Tourism and hospitality are hard hit with travel only possible to a limited extent.

Hotels and Restaurants have to meet high hygiene requirements but the crisis offers opportunities for a change in values ​​and more Sustainability and Fair Travel.

Camping is trendy and caravan sites are currently reporting a significant increase in pre-bookings throughout Europe.

The Federal Statistical Office in Germany also reported that in 2019, 35.8 million overnight stays were registered at camping sites or in caravans and the demand has been steadily increasing for years. The corona series have reinforced this development:

“The awareness that for the time being it will no longer be possible to travel far away or that one’s own health is more important then traveling to countries that are far away,” says Christian Buer to DW. The professor for Tourism Management at Heilbronn University observes “new insights into experiencing your own new tranquility, which can also be enjoyed in the natural environment.”

Buer is convinced: “Sustainable tourism will win” and those who, as hosts that are are more focused on nature meet the new needs of travelers for more adventure and less demanding thinking.

Clear losers however, are long-distance travel and cruise-line providers.

Tobias Ehlen, Professor of Business Law in the Department of Tourism at Worms University of Applied Sciences, told DW that “the widespread discussion about CO2 emissions and climate change before the pandemic began will change the way people travel will also become more exclusive and perceived with greater responsibility”.

Norway Promotes Green Travel
Scandinavia has traditionally been a travel destination for nature fans and individualists without the all-round carefree package. Norway’s official travel website visitnorway.com is promoting “Green Travel” these weeks. The state tourism office encourages travel by ships that run on environmentally friendly fuel as soon as the borders open and the country promotes travel by bus, train or an e-car.

Norway has set up more than 10,000 charging stations for electric cars.

One of them is Hornsjö Hotel, overlooking the Olympic city of Lillehammer has gone through many crises.

After bankruptcy: from a luxury hotel to a vintage hostel
“The decline in the hotel industry began in the early 1980s with offshore oil production,” says long-time hotel employee Jan Björke. “The Norwegians use energy from water and wind power and the oil is exported and has filled the state treasury.

Huts have been built since the 1980s but “The trend towards weekend homes in the mountains, at lakes and by the sea continues by Norwegian’s and hotels are almost exclusively booked by foreign tourists.

When the One World Institute Foundation took over the building complex in 1995, new inventory was needed. “We knew that luxury hotels in Norway re-establish themselves every five to eight years. It took a while to overcome, but we wrote to everyone in an emergency,” says Björke with a smile.

The response was overwhelming and now the seating furniture glows in soothing green-turquoise with all the furniture, curtain fabrics, mattresses that was donated. Some pieces have a scratch. “It’s just vintage,” laughs Jan Björke, whose next goal is to become self-sufficient through permaculture. One of the buildings is empty and an aquaponics facility will be built there, in which fish and vegetables will thrive.

Spreewald instead of Dubai
Jasmin Taylor generated 176 million Euros in 2015 and was the market leader for trips to the United Arab Emirates and Egypt but the tour operator had to file for bankruptcy two years later.

“I deliberately looked for peace and nature, reduced myself to the essentials, sorted myself and finally focused on my strengths,” Taylor describes her process in the crisis. The Berlin-based artist with Iranian roots and a degree in the USA has now founded Seelandhaus, a company that enables vacation in the vicinity of nature, adventure in a harmonious environment.

The house she bought in the Spreewald near Berlin has a past as a children’s home and was also used for refugee accommodation. A retreat oasis is being created on the 57,000 square meter site in the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve with only 23 huts on the huge area between trees. Puristic furnishings made of high-quality materials, a fireplace for the inside and a fireplace on the terrace. “Inside there is everything you need but very reduced,” reveals Taylor. “And outside there is an opportunity to absorb the power of nature, forest and lake.” Regional produce, herbs and vegetables from our own farm are served.

Professor Ortwin Renn from the Institute for Transformative Sustainability Research (IASS) in Potsdam believes the lessons from the corona crisis lie in sustainable crisis management. The environmental sociologist bases his thesis on involuntary self-sufficiency if this virtue is continued voluntarily. “If the coronavirus crisis lasts longer, new routines can develop that have gradually become independent in the course of coping with the crisis.”

Because of Corona: Free travel for cyclists
Brussels is leading the way, due to the narrow streets and to comply with the social distancing rules. The Brussels city administration allows pedestrians and cyclists to use the entire width of the inner city streets. The rule initially applies for three months. In Germany, cyclists have been allowed to ride side by side in urban areas for an unlimited period since April. Motorists must keep a distance of at least 1.50 meters and reduce their speed accordingly. Since the end of April 2020 and violators have also been threatened with higher fines and faster driving bans.

Without much grumbling, the rules are accepted, which can permanently contribute to a decelerated lifestyle.

Corona crisis as an opportunity for new, sustainable tourism
Dirk Glaesser, Director of Sustainable Tourism Development at the World Tourism Organization UNWTO has written books on crisis management in tourism and says that for negative events to be noticed at all and have an effect, they must either be experienced directly or communicated.

The Corona crisis has some positive environmental impacts, such as pictures of clean canals in Venice or the short-term expansion of cycle paths. These influences and measures can accommodate the UNWTO Tourism 2030 strategy and it is designed to make optimal use of environmental resources and preserve biodiversity.

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Reporting mainly on the Asia Pacific region and the global Coronavirus crises in countries such as the United States, Mainland China, Brazil, Mexico, Italy and Germany. Love to Travel and report daily on destinations reopening with a focus on Domestic travel within Europe, North America and the Caribbean. Fan of the English Premier League , the German Bundesliga,, the Spanish La Liga.

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Germany

Mannheim Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Germany

Mannheim1000x600

Mannheim is a city in the northwest corner of the state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany, at the confluence of the Rhine and Neckar rivers. It is close to Ludwigshafen.

Coronavirus since Reopening

Germany Covid-19 Situation Report
185,414
Confirmed
490
Confirmed (24h)
8,763
Deaths
27
Deaths (24h)
4.7%
Deaths (%)
168,900
Recovered
400
Recovered (24h)
7,751
Active

Understand

Mannheim was a small fishing village before it became a city at the beginning of the 17th century. It was constructed on the site of a fortress guarding the confluence of the rivers Rhine and Neckar. Even now, a few remnants of the fortification can be seen, and the peculiar street layout owes to that part of its history. For 58 years, Mannheim served as a royal residence, and gave Schiller, Lessing, Goethe and Mozart a home for some time.

Before World War II,Mannheim was a beautiful city, but was flattened in bomb raids due to its industrial significance. When it was time to rebuild the city, Mannheim, like many other German cities, opted for an all out modern approach to urban development. Thus, most of the old quarters were replaced by buildings typical of the 1950s. If you are not an adept to architecture, their appeal might not be easy to grasp. As a result, the impression is more of an industrial city with a few spots of beauty.

Modern Mannheim is the second largest city in Baden-Württemberg and one of the hotspots of immigration. Because of that you’ll encounter a lively and colorful mixture of nationalities and cultures in the city.

  • Tourist Information MannheimWilly-Brandt-Platz 5, ,  .

Get in

By plane

Transport from Frankfurt Airport, to Mannheim or neighbouring Ludwigshafen, is by ICE high speed train (30 minutes, €25) with Lufthansa Express Rail. Mannheim also has a small local airport, the Mannheim City AirportThis airport is connected to Berlin Tegel and Hamburg up to twice daily (weekdays) by Rhein-Neckar-Air with small Turboprops, but their fares are pretty high. In the summer there are even flights to Sylt. 

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By train

Mannheim is a regional transport hub with ICE, IC and regional trains all stopping in Mannheim Hauptbahnhof. There are direct connections to and from many major German Cities, including BerlinHamburgMunich and Cologne, international destinations are BaselInnsbruck, Salzburg, Paris and Marseille (via Strasbourg and Lyon). There are three CityNightline (CNL) trains crossing Mannheim, connecting it to Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Milan and Prague overnight. However, arrival and departure times for night trains can be in the middle of the night as Mannheim lies along the line and not on either terminus and onward connections can be scarce or nonexistent.

By bus

Mannheim is served by Eurolines (Deutsche Touring) with overnight long distance services to destinations in France, UK and other neighboring countries. The bus station (ZOB) is at Heinrich-von-Stephan-Str, near the Main Station (Hauptbahnhof).

In the domestic business, Mannheim is served by – among others – Flixbus and Dein Bus

Get around

The center of Mannheim is laid out like a chess board, with no real street names. Addresses in the Quadrat take the form of a grid reference, such as Q3, 12 designating a block. Note that the streets themselves are not named, rather “Q3” refers to the block itself. If you follow a street from Q3, you might end up at either Q2 or P3. It is best to navigate by “following” the blocks rather than the streets. If you get lost, a rather high probability, simply ask a local. They are used to it.

The public transportation system is quite extensive. Bus routes cover Mannheim, and the tram system connects Mannheim to Ludwigshafen across the river, Heidelberg a few minutes away, and Weinheim, in addition to major routes across and through the city. Local/Regional Trains of the S-Bahn Rhein-Neckar connect Mannheim and the surrounding cities and countryside. Unfortunately as of 2018, the automatic ticket machines only accept coins, not notes or cards.

  • Verkehrsverbund Rhein-Neckar (Rhine-Neckar Transport) – Public transportation network
  • S-Bahn Rhein-Neckar – Local/Regional trains

See

  • Water tower (Wasserturm), FriedrichsplatzOne of the most famous icons of the Jugendstil (Arte-Nouveau style) in Germany, the water tower (and small park surrounding it) is a great place to sit in the summer for a picnic or just a little rest. The park is surrounded by the Rosengarten, a conference hall of reddish brick, and the colors on a sunny day are amazing.
  • Mannheim Palace (Barockschloss Mannheim), Bismarckstraße (It is right next to the main train station.), ,  Tu-Su, PH 10:00-17:00Part of the University of Mannheim; Mozart used to give concerts here. 7€, 3.50€ concessions.
  • Paradeplatz (the center of the city, pedestrians-only). A small park, surrounded by shops, restaurants and everything you can imagine.
  • KonkordienkircheWith about 92 meters the tower of the church is the highest one in Mannheim.
  • ChristuskircheWerderplatz 15, . The original Steinmeyer Organ with about 8000 pipes is one of the biggest within Germany and was built in 1911.
  • LuisenparkTheodor-Heuss-Anlage 2, . 09:00 -16.30 in winter and 9:00 – 18:30 in summerThe attractions include a greenhouse, “gondoletta” boats, and a variety of facilities for children. Entrance to one side is free, but there is a charge to enter the other side (summer: 8€, winter 4€).
  • HerzogenriedparkMax-Joseph-Straße 64, . Main attractions are a little zoo, a rose exhibition and the park lake. 3,5 €.

Museums

  • Reiss-Engelhorn Museum (REM), Museum Weltkulturen D5, 68159 Mannheim, ,  Tu-Su 11:00-18:00At D5 and C5 (see above for explanation of downtown addresses), the REM houses a permanent exhibiton world cultures along with an exhibition hall whose contents range from photography to astronomy. 12.50€, 6.50€ Concessions.
  • Technoseum (Museum of Technology)Museumsstraße 1, ,  Mo-Su 09:00-17:00The Technomuseum displays various tools and machines from different times. 9€, 6€ Concessions.
  • 10 Kunsthalle (Art Gallery)Friedrichsplatz 4, .

Do

  • National Theater Mannheim (NTM), Mozartstraße 9 (The street car stops right outside the theater), ,  Has a different show almost every night (for some shows, like ballets or opera, the language barrier is not an issue). student tickets are much reduced (5 or 15 euro).
  • CineplexP4 13 (Tram: “Strohmarkt”), . Includes showings of films in original English
  • SAP ArenaAn der Arena 1 (Tram: “SAP Arena” / Train: “Mannheim ARENA/Maimarkt”), . Ice hockey, Handball and music concerts. 
  • Congress Center Rosengarten (m:con), Rosengartenplatz 2 (Tram: “Rosengarten”), . Music concerts and conferences.
  • CapitolWaldhofstr. 2 (Tram: „Alte Feuerwache”), . Tickets: Tue, Thu, Fri 2PM-7PM, Sat 11AM-1PMConcerts, Musicals and Comedy.
  • Maimarkt (“May Market”), Xaver-Fuhr-Str. 101 (Tram: “Maimarkt”). April 27 to May 7 in 2019, 9AM-6PMLargest regional consumer exhibition of Germany, for eleven days in April/May. There are also many other events on the site over the rest of the year. 8€.

Stay safe in Mannheim

The most parts of Mannheim are safe, but there are a couple of districts that have higher crime rates. Examples are Vogelstang, Neckarstadt-West, Jungbusch (night) and some others. Street crime and violence, however, are very rare, so you will be perfectly ok if you simply use your common sense. In particular, it is not dangerous at all to visit the pubs and clubs of the Jungbusch or the Neckarstadt.

Buy

In the city center of Mannheim you can find two big shopping streets, the “Planken” (planks) and the “Breite Straße (broad street), both of which are only open to pedestrians and the tram. Here you can find dozens of shops and stores for clothes, shoes, jewelry and sweets. See below for more information. On the other side of the river Rhine, in Ludwigshafen the “Rhein-Gallery” is a big shopping mall, an even bigger mall is located in Viernheim (Tram line 5), the “Rhein-Neckar-Zentrum”.

Eat

  • Spaghettieis was invented in Mannheim in 1969. Vanilla ice cream is pressed through a spaetzle press, creating the spaghetti-like shape, over which comes strawberry sauce as tomato sauce and grated white chocolate as grated cheese.
  • Mannheim is known for its many pretzel stands. Little pretzel baguettes with mozzarella and tomato are quite yum.
  • The Döner is a kind of Turkish kebab found throughout Germany and is definitely worth trying! One of the most popular Döner stalls is located right across the train station, called City Döner (see below). It is very common to have a Döner there after partying.
  • City DönerWilly-Brandt-Platz 5-7 (located opposite from the central station). 6AM-5AMOne of the best and most-visited Döner Shops in Mannheim, open almost 24/7.
  • Schotti’s Burger ImbissFriesenheimer Str. 6 (in the industry area “Friesenheimer Insel”), ,  Small Burger Shop, makes the best Burgers in Mannheim.
  • Benjamins DinerGorxheimer Straße 9, . 10AM-11PM, Weekends till 12AMAmerican-style diner, located near the old Army facilities of Benjamin-Franklin-Village in “Käfertal”. Usually crowded; reservations suggested.
  • Katik DönerKaiserring 40, 68161 Mannheim (Across the street from Heller’s). Another döner shop near train station.
  • Little IndiaT2 17, . 11AM-10PMVery small Indian restaurant. Don’t get fooled by the look from the outside. The food is delicious.
  • MetzgereiRheinparkstraße 4In summer you can rent a full picnic basket there and take it to the Rhine river. Of course you can also eat inside the restaurant, but reserve a table in advance.
  • Heller’sVegetarian Restaurant since 1987(!). Self-Service with a huge buffet. You pay by weight. Also cakes and other deserts are available.
  • 424Rheinpromenade 15Closed on Mondays and TuesdaysHigh class vegetarian restaurant, situated directly at the Rhine river. The building is split in two areas. In the other part there is a non-vegetarian restaurant called Rheinterrassen
  • RheinterrassenShares the space with 424 and is run by the same owner. In summer the big beer garden is open. Many people pass by, since this is the main Rhine promenade.
  • Istanbul and Meydan, G1 (Marktplatz). Both restaurant are close together. Only Cafe Journal (good breakfast) is in between. Both are Turkish restaurants. Mannheim is famous for its big Turkish community, so these restaurants offer a variety of different and traditional Turkish dishes, not limited to Döner Kebab. Definitely a part of Mannheim’s food culture. There are many more Turkish restaurants and shops in the area west of Marktplatz. Therefore some refer to the area as “Little Istanbul”.
  • Sunday morning buns. Get fresh buns for breakfast even on Sunday morning at G1 (Marktplatz). Backfactory and another bakery on the other side of the tram tracks are open on Sundays.

Drink

  • Blau (German for “blue”), Jungbuschstraße 14is the favourite hangout for leftists, post-punks and alternative culture adepts. It is also here where you are likely to run into activities of the “Büro für angewandten Realismus” (office for applied realism), a group of artists that organise cultural events every now and then. Additionally, there are displays of their artwork in the pub.
  • OnyxFriedrichsplatz 12 (near the Wasserturm), . is bustling with activity almost every night after normal working hours. They offer a full bar and excellent menu for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Typically more dressy than other hangouts.
  • Café BernsteinSeckenheimer Straße 58 (located in the Schwetzinger Vorstadt. 10 min walk from Main station), . is a nice French style Bar/Café that offers a good selection of beers and wines. They also offer a small but fine selection of lunch/dinner. Reasonable prices. Exceptional friendly staff!
  • Café OdeonG7,10is a nice Bar that belongs to an alternative Cinema. Reasonable prices and relaxed people.
  • SOHO ClubJ7,16 (located on the ring-road that begirds the inner city), . is a small club with reasonable prices, good music and relaxed guests between 20 and 40. Music varies from night to night. Don’t miss the cocktail happy hour until 11PM
  • Murphy’s LawKaiserring 10-12 (Bahnhofvorplatz), . is a great Irish pub that serves up Boddington’s and Kilkenny on tap (a rare find), in addition to the usual suspects. The pub fare is better than most, especially the Irish breakfast, chili, and fish and chips. It’s usually packed on the Weekend nights with English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish and American ex pats and a few Germans (typically University students) thrown in there for local flavor. Just a hop and a skip from the main train station. Weeknds, Fall to Spring usually feature live music. Tuesday is trivia night. Be sure to say hello to John at the end of the bar.
  • Havana BarP6, 16 – 19 (Tram: “Wasserturm”), . Mon-Thu 9AM-3AM, Fri-Sat 9AM-5AM, Sun 11AM-3AMNice bar near one of Mannheim’s main streets (“Planken”), also offers great Food. Weekly offers.
  • Café ViennaS1 15, 68161 MannheimSun.-Thu. from 10AM-2AM, Fri. and Sat. from 10AM to 3AMPopular amongst student for its cheap price for its drinks (especially beer) and foods.

You might also want to have a look at a detailed local nightlife guide (in German), and a calendar and guide for all kinds of events and locations in Mannheim, Heidelberg and Ludwigshafen.

Where to stay in Mannheim

  • Youth hostel (Jugendherberge Mannheim), Rheinpromenade 21, .
  • Etap HotelLanglachweg 18 (about 8km east), .
  • Hotel LuxaU1 11, .
  • Bed & Breakfast Mannheim (Apt Inn Mannheim), Waldparkstraße 30, . An affordable hotel with kitchen located within walking distance of the train stations in an historic building in Lindenhof. €50.
  • Dorint Kongresshotel MannheimFriedrichsring 6, ,  Quality hotel in the centre of town. from € 76.5 per room/night.
  • B&B Hotel MannheimWill-Sohl-Straße 7 (Tram: “Neuostheim”, next to the City Airport), ,  Check-in: 2PM, check-out: 12PM61€.

Cope

Religious services

  • Overview of mass times in all Catholic churches in Mannheim
  • St. Ignatius und Franz-Xaver, Jesuitenkirche, A4, 2 (15 min from central station, direction Nordwest; bus 60 to “Mensa”).  Sat: 18:30; Sun: 9:30, 10:30 (span.), 11:30, 18:00; Mon-Fri: 18:00
  • Hl. Geist, Moltkestr. 14 (5-8 min from central station, direction east). Sun: 11:00, 13:00 (Croat.), 19:00; Tue, Thu: 18:00, Fri: 10:00
  • St. Joseph , Bellenstr. 67 (8-10 min from central station, direction south).  Sat: 18:45; Sun: 11:00; Tue, Fri: 19:00; Thu: 9:00

Go next

  • Bertha Benz Memorial Route – Follow the tracks of the world’s first automobile journey back in 1888 (Mannheim – Pforzheim – Mannheim)
  • Ludwigshafen is right across the river.
  • Heidelberg the most famous city near Mannheim and is reachable by tram/street car (40-50 minutes), regional train (15 minutes) or IC (10 minutes).
  • The cathedrals at Mainz and Speyer, and the cathedral and Nibelungen bridge at Worms are all about 30 minutes away.

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Germany

Heidelberg Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

heidelberg1000x600

Heidelberg is a city in the state of Baden-Württemberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

Coronavirus since Reopening

Germany Covid-19 Situation Report
185,414
Confirmed
490
Confirmed (24h)
8,763
Deaths
27
Deaths (24h)
4.7%
Deaths (%)
168,900
Recovered
400
Recovered (24h)
7,751
Active

Understand

It is no secret that Heidelberg is a jewel among German travel destinations. Heidelberg is located in the Neckar river valley right where the legend-rich Odenwald (Forest of Odes or Odin) opens up towards the plains of the Rhine Valley. Heidelberg is home to the oldest university in Germany (est. 1386). With 28,000 students, the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität (or Ruperto Carola, the Latin equivalent of its name) is one of Germany’s larger academic institutions and boasts the full spectrum of an ancient academy, from Egyptian Studies to Computer Linguistics. The faculties for Medicine, Law and Natural Sciences are considered to be among the best in Germany. The university fostered the establishment of several other world class research institutions such as the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), the European Molecular Biological Laboratory (EMBL), Center for Molecular Biology (ZMBH), Max Planck Institutes for Medicine, Astronomy, Nuclear Physics, among others. Generally speaking, Heidelberg is an academic city with a long and rich history and is similar in many ways to cities such as Cambridge or Oxford (Heidelberg and Cambridge, England are twinned).

During WWII, the city was almost completely spared allied bombings which destroyed many of Germany’s larger inner cities. As a result, Heidelberg has retained its baroque charm of narrow streets, picturesque houses and of course the world-famous Schloss (castle ruins). After World War II, the US Army built large barracks at the southern end of the city. Heidelberg’s 149,600 inhabitants at one point included not only 28,000 students at the university but also nearly 20,000 US citizens, almost all of them soldiers and their families. However, in 2015, the US Army presence relocated to a different city in Germany.

With hundreds of thousands of tourists flocking to the city annually, Heidelberg is truly a culturally diverse and international destination, despite its small size. Over the years, Heidelberg has attracted numerous artists, intellectuals and academics from all over Europe and has sometimes been referred to as Germany’s unofficial intellectual capital. People who have lived and worked in the city include the poets Joseph von Eichendorff, Jean Paul and Goethe, scientists such as Bunsen and Kirchhoff, philosophers such as the founder of the “Illuminati” order von-Knigge, atheist Ludwig Feuerbach, existentialist Karl Jaspers, political theorist Hannah Arendt, architect Albert Speer, and many more. Mark Twain wrote in A Tramp Abroad:

Get in

By plane

ICE Train from Frankfurt or Stuttgart Airport to Heidelberg

You can travel to Heidelberg via ICE (InterCity Express), Germany’s fastest train, running at up to 300 km/h (180 mph) on German rails. For more info and booking see German Railways (Deutsche Bahn, DB) website.

Both Frankfurt and Stuttgart airports have train stations inside the terminal. Frankfurt Airport even is a major ICE train stop.

Reservations are not necessary; just buy your ticket at the counter or machine after you land. Credit cards are accepted; most staff speak English. It might be necessary to change trains (only once) at Mannheim, Stuttgart, or Frankfurt Central Station, but it is still likely to be faster than the bus. One way prices: Frankfurt €26.00 (ICE), Stuttgart €29 (IC) €41 (ICE).

Lufthansa Shuttle Bus

Lufthansa provides a shuttle bus from Frankfurt to Heidelberg for €25 one way (taking one hour) and €46 round trip. If you have a Lufthansa Ticket, you get €2 discount.

Minor Airports

  • Frankfurt-Hahn – An airport in the middle of the beautiful green mountains of Hunsrück is a major hub for Ryanair. There are frequent bus connections from Heidelberg Hbf to Frankfurt-Hahn; the trip takes a little more than 2 hours, and costs €20 with Hahn Express, bookable via flixbus (fixed price one way as of 2018). Other bus companies offer indirect connections only and there is no train to Hahn, though DB operates a bus from Frankfurt main station to Hahn.
  • Baden-Baden has an airport, too. Mainly domestic flights are handled at this airport

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By train

  • The main train station Heidelberg Hbf is located in the western part of the city, from there you can take a tram to any place downtown e.g. Bismarckplatz (taxis are not recommended as they are far more expensive than trams!) Check for connections to “Heidelberg Bismarckplatz” on German Railway Website
  • There are direct train lines from Heidelberg to Stuttgart, Karlsruhe, Mannheim and Frankfurt – and direct long distance trains to Munich, Vienna, Hamburg and Cologne usually running at least every 2 hours.
  • For most long distance destinations it is useful to take the regional train to nearby Mannheim Hbf (S-Bahn, about 15 minutes), from where there are frequent direct high speed connections to all major cities in Germany and some places in the nearby countries (e.g. ParisZurich, Amsterdam).
  • Taking slow trains will be much cheaper on a Saturday or Sunday, especially if you have a five-person group ticket, “Schönes Wochenende”, for € 42 total or every day “Länderticket Baden-Württemberg” for € 22 – 38 total.
  • Locomore connects Heidelberg to Stuttgart and Berlin. DB tickets aren’t valid on Locomore and vice versa, since Locomore belongs to the Flixbus company.

By car

The A5 connects Heidelberg directly to Frankfurt and Karlsruhe. It’s easy to reach from any direction.

Get around

The city runs a small but rather effective system of trams and buses. The two most important nodal points are the main station and Bismarckplatz. A single trip costs €2.60, and a day ticket costs €6.70. Ticket machines at most tram and bus stops take cash and cards, and have instructions in English as well as German.

Bus #32 and #33 connect the main train station (Hauptbahnhof) with the old city area; detailed maps, schedules and routes can be found online. A mountain railway runs between four stations (including the castle), linking the old city on the level of the river with the summit of the Königstuhl Mountain, about 400 m (1312 feet) above the city.

The “HeidelbergCARD”, a tourist pass that includes public transportation, many museums, and the lower section of the mountain railway (a separate fare is required for the upper section), can be bought at the tourist information center located just outside the main station.

See

  • Altstadt and Hauptstraße (historical city center and main street). The Hauptstraße leads from Bismarckplatz across the old town. Approximately one mile in length, it is reputedly the longest pedestrian shopping street in Germany.
  • CastleThe castle is above the old town, and can be reached by mountain railway (included in the ticket price) or staircase. An audio guide tour of the castle and its grounds is available for a fee near the entrance. It is available in several languages, including English. There is also a statue to the German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in the castle gardens. The castle hosts an outdoor Christmas market during December, which can get extremely busy (in recent years, this Christmas market had to be relocated to the Altstadt to protect the bat population in the castle). The castle grounds are free to visit, and offer a great view of the city and river. €7.
  • PhilosophenwegThe Philosophenweg which can be found on the northern side of the city. It provides a wonderful view across the oldest part of the city. Here you can find the site of the famous Merian Stich (engraving) which is a popular illustration of Heidelberg.
  • HeiligenbergThe Heiligenberg mountain which boasts a wonderful view over the old town.
  • ThingstätteThe Thingstätte on top of Heiligenberg (an open-air theatre built by the Nazi regime in 1934 to host propaganda events)
  • HeiligenbergAlso on the Heiligenberg the remnants of a wall ancient Celts built to keep Germanic tribes out, the Heidenloch, a deep well with unknown origins, and the ruins of a 10th-century cloister.
  • Kurpfälzisches MuseumThe Kurpfälzisches Museum on the Hauptstraße contains interesting exhibits of items from Heidelberg’s pre-history to modern times.
  • UniversitätsplatzThe old university on Universitätsplatz in the old city and the adjacent old armory which is now a student cafeteria (but also open to the public).
  • JesuitenkircheIt has 1712 Baroque construction with modern touches inside.
  • HeiliggeistkircheThe Heiliggeistkirche church is only one of many large and small churches, but definitely the one with the most interesting history. During the Dark Ages, it was the shelter of the Bibliotheca Palatina, Germany’s oldest library. The Bibliotheca was stolen and brought to Rome but eventually returned in pieces. Today, parts of it can be visited in the University Library (also the oldest and probably the most valuable of its kind in Germany), which is situated close to the old university. You can get a great view of the Heiliggeistkirche, Old Town, and the Neckar river bridge from the castle (Schloss Heidelberg).

What to do in Heidelberg

The city boasts more than twelve cinemas, over eight theaters, including

  • StadttheaterTheaterstraße 10the large state-run theater
  • ZimmertheaterHauptstraße 118, ,  Germany’s oldest private theatre
  • KarlstorbahnhofAm Karlstor 1, 69117 HeidelbergOne of the progressive culture center in the east-end of the old city.
  • Halle_02Zollhofgarten 2, 69115 Heidelberg (Just walk to the other side of the main station towards Bahnstadt). Hosting concerts and exhibitions in a converted warehouse. The area used to be one of the barracks of US Army.
  • Königstuhl-Mountain568 m (1560 ft) high, 450 m (1480 ft) above Heidelberg, is a nice option to escape the hustle and bustle of Heidelberg downtown. The mountain top of Königstuhl offers a nice view over Heidelberg and the Rhine Valley. In good weather conditions you can see the Northern Black Forest. The same funicular railway that carries visitors to the castle continues to the mountain top. You will have to switch trains once—the final one to the top is a historical wooden funicular train. (A separate fare is required for the historical funicular.) On the top you can have a look at the more-than-100-year-old engine that just pulled you up. (No worries—made in Germany!)
  • HimmelsleiterIf you feel more energetic, you can take the Himmelsleiter (Heaven’s Ladder or Sky Ladder) — a stairway of 1200 steps winding up 270 meters (890 ft) up to Königstuhl. It ends 10 meters east of the mountain top funicular station. The lower end of stairs is just above the castle, but a bit hidden.
  • Tourist Information at the main stationWilly-Brandt-Platz 1, ,  April 1 – October 31: Monday to Saturday 9AM – 7PM, Sunday, Holidays 10AM – 6PM;November 1 – March 31: Monday to Saturday 9AM – 6PM, Sunday, Holidays closedThe Tourist Information Centers at the rail station has a wide range of information for your every need. Whether you need a room, tickets for city tours and the castle, ideas for things to do or are simply looking for souvenirs.

Buy

The main shopping area is from Bismarckplatz along the Hauptstraße. Here you will find the big chains as well as the small unique shops.

  • Go by the Cathedral during the day for small markets selling souvenirs
  • The English BookstorePlöck 93, . For books in English

Eat

BBQ & Beer – On sunny summer days the “Neckarwiese” (‘Neckar meadow’, northern bank of Neckar river, just west of Bismarckplatz) is full of people relaxing in the sun, having a Barbecue or a beer… This place also offers a nice view to the castle. You will have to bring your own grill, beer and steaks. Cheap grills to use once are available at the “Bauhaus” do-it-yourself store at Kurfürsten-Anlage 11, just 200m south of Bismarckplatz. Nice way to mix with locals. Grilling is only allowed in two zones marked with cobblestones. Do not put one-way-grills onto the grass, it will leave a hole in the grass.

Snacks – Along the Hauptstraße, which runs through the center of town, you will find several bakeries that serve local specialities including “Brezeln” (pretzels). Department stores have a nice selection of delicatessen stalls called “Markthallen” where you can eat everything on the spot.

Cafes – Many of the cafes in Heidelberg set up outside tables when the weather is fair, and these are enjoyed by locals and tourists alike. A popular destination for summer cafe beer sipping and lounging is the Marktplatz, which is adjacent to the Heiliggeistkirche.

Meals – The Haupstraße is plentiful with an amazing variety of restaurants. Dishes tend to be served in large portions, relatively inexpensive and of good quality. You can find something for almost every taste including Japanese, Indian, Italian, Chinese, German and Bavarian. American fast food and “Döner” restaurants cater to the budget conscious and late-night crowds.

  • Mensa im MarstallhofMaybe the most beautiful University Canteen in Germany, offering food and beer at low prices in a historic buildling and a Beer Garden!. Everybody is welcome, Open till late…
  • Sunisas Thai ImbissSpeyerer Straße 1, 69115 Heidelberg, [0] 6221 / 6555533: if you want a change from German food: an authentic, tasty Thai diner and takeaway with reasonable prices. It also has terrace, pool tables and cocktails. Open at 11AM till late at night.
  • Thaipanon the Hauptstraße, at the Universitätsplatz. An excellent, reasonably priced, Thai restaurant, with great service. The food is as authentic as it can get in Europe. Try the Giow Grob (deep fried Chicken Parcels) for a starter. In general, ask for “Thai spicy” if you want the real thing but only if you can deal with it!
  • Korean/Sushi restaurantHeiliggeiststraße 3, close to the Marktplatz, next to the Hotel zum Rathaus, a seemingly little-known, but great sushi place (also serves Korean food).
  • La Locanda 26Steubenstraße 26, . Opening Hours: 11.00 – 23.00 / Wednesday closedmiddle.
  • BrunnenStube (Restaurant BrunnenStube), Kranichweg 15 (see website for directions), . Mon.-Sat. from 17:00, closed Sundays and some public holidays;Nice restaurant with modern German cuisine and moderate prices. Great fish, lamb and many seasonal specials. Located in the west of Heidelberg’s center in a living area. Patio dining in summer. Main course from €7.90-18.90.

Drink

More than 300 bars, pubs, clubs, discothèques and the like, from Bavarian style tourist restaurants with deer antlers on the walls to extremely left-wing student bars which reserve the right to refuse police officers entry to the bar. You name it. Find your place and enjoy yourself. Heidelberg knows no curfew. Most bars close at 1AM, but especially the students bars are often open until the early morning. Although the locals—even the police officers—are used to drunk tourists as well as to drunk students, please be calm on your way home and do not riot. As a remnant of the student revolts, Heidelberg has the largest ratio of policemen per capita and you may find yourself in the arms of an officer much faster than you think.

If you are a young person and happen to discover one of the student parties (which are quite numerous but advertised mostly by word-of-mouth), you scored the jackpot. Get inside, get a (dirt cheap) beer and have fun. But try and avoid being recognised as a tourist. No party ends before 3AM and many run until 6 or 7AM. Either Untere Straße or the Zieglers (Heidelbergs oldest students’ bar) are frequently crowded with students.

  • Wines are produced around Heidelberg (e.g. Schriesheim, Wiesloch), but it might be difficult to get hold of them – unless you simply go to a vineyard… When you buy wine, always a safe bet is a Riesling from Pfalz or some white wine from Baden instead, or try any of the numerous wines from other German wine regions.
  • Vineyards Vineyards are usually located in the middle of small towns along Bergstraße (Highway B3). Fruit farmers sell wine right on their farm e.i. vineyard – make sure you also ask for Apple Wine (Hesse specialty) and New Wine (wine still in process of fermentation – sold from the barrel, bring a canister!) which you can sometimes drink in some ‘wine-beergarden’ right on site. Take a tram (5/5R) northbound to any place between Schriesheim and Lützelsachsen or a local train (S3/S4) southbound to Wiesloch – or (even better, if you have the time) S1 or S2 to Neustadt, where you will find yourself in an endless landscape of vine stocks.
  • Mensa im MarstallhofMaybe the most beautiful University Canteen in Germany and maybe also Heidelberg’s cheapest Beer Garden. Serving Welde-Beer (the Beer with screwed bottle necks and answering on any question… ) Everybody is welcome, Open till late…
  • Vetter’s BrauhausSteingasseVetter’s is famous for having one of the strongest beers in world (Vetter 33).
  • KulturbrauereiNext to the Old Bridge in the Leyergasse there is this small breweries
  • Großer MohrSmall but highly recommended. Tuesday night the odds are high to find the Mohr besieged by medical students.
  • SonderbarThe latter boasts a huge collection of absinthe, whiskeys and whiskys, as well as a very distinctive atmosphere.
  • DestilleThere is a tree in the center of the establishment.
  • TrinidadThis cocktail bar at the edge of the Old Town is small, but famous for its drinks and continuously receives praise in local restaurant guides.
  • O’ReillysAn Irish pub north of the river, just over the bridge from Bisi (Bismarckplatz).
  • DublinerA good Irish pub at the center of Heidelberg Mainstreet (Downtown)
  • Ham Ham’sA great place to chill, drink, and smoke
  • NektarA very relaxed and chill place to enjoy a drink and party
  • B.J.Z. BarGreat place to party in Emmertsgrund, its a B.Y.O.A. (Bring your own alcohol) and you can crash anywhere in the house
  • The Brass MonkeyFriendly bar on Haspelgasse, just opposite the old bridge. Good crowd and all staff also speak fluent English.
  • Star CoffeeIf you are looking for coffee rather than alcohol, Star Coffee has two branches, one off Bismarckplatz and the other on the Hauptstraße, serving a variety of coffees and offering free WiFi access.
  • Moro CafesFewer computers but more style are found in the two Moro Cafes, directly at the Alte Brücke and one on the Hauptstraße.

Recently, most pubs close much earlier in the night, even on the weekends at around 2AM. Just move to one of the numerous clubs, which usually have no entrance fee this late at night.

Be Safe

Heidelberg is an extremely safe city (even by German standards). However, women walking alone at night should take the usual precautions they would do anywhere else. Walking along the northern Neckar banks at night would not be advised, except in groups, particularly by the Studentenwohnheime (dorms). The shrubs are thick and it is very dark.

Usually there won’t be any problem. If you are a bit ‘paranoid’ you can take a Taxi. If you are from New York, you might think they are cheap – if you are from East-Europe or Asia you will feel like they are ripping you off… use as needed. There are also “Frauentickets” available for women, you can buy these coupons for €8 and they will cover the fare for anywhere in the city.

Don’t walk on bicycle lanes! – Really don’t! (they are often painted in red, but always separated from the pedestrian lanes by a white line): Heidelberg has more cyclists than motorists, and many of them have a rather cavalier way of riding. The southern parallel street to Hauptstraße (called Plöck) is the main traffic channel for student cyclists between Bismarkplatz and University Square. During the day it can be such a buzz, it’s already a sight worth visiting. But watch out: Many cyclists feel safe from the tourists there and lose all their good manners.

Sleep

Budget

  • Steffi’s Hostel HeidelbergAlte Eppelheimer Str. 50 (Just walk straight out of the station and cross the big street and the tram rails in front of you. On the other side there’s a modern building, where you enter a shopping arcade (Kurfürstenpassage – Jack Wolfskin / Backpacker Store). Again you walk straight ahead through the passage and leave it on the opposite side. From the exit you can already see a big brick stone building in front of you. Here on the third floor above the Lidl supermarket, Steffis Hostel Heidelberg is situated.), ,  Check-in: 10AM – 1PM and 5PM – 8PM, check-out: until 12Dorms from €20, everything included.
  • Youth Hostel Heidelberg (Jugendherberge Heildelberg), Tiergartenstraße 5, . Large well maintained hostel, on the eastern bank of the Neckar River, 25 min walk away from the central rail station. Public transportation: take bus 32 from central rail station towards north (Sportzentrum Nord), get off at Jugendherberge stop. Dorms from €28,30 including breakfast and linen, various concession apply. Towels can be rented from the reception for additional €2.
  • Hotel ISGIn the suburb of Boxberg about a 15 minute taxi ride from central Heidelberg. Fitted out in the Bauhaus style the rooms are comfortable enough (and the bathrooms are excellent) but there is nothing to do in Boxberg.
  • Hotel Restaurant Scheid, . is a nice, quiet, reasonably priced hotel in the suburb of Schriesheim, a short tram ride north of Heidelberg. Schriesheim is built on a hill so if you are hitting the clubs, don’t forget about the late 30 min. night walk up the hill from the tram stop (Schriesheim Bahnhof).
  • B&B HotelRudolf-Diesel-Str. 7 (corner of Speyerer Str.) (Bus 33 from the train station to Rudolf-Diesel-Str. stop), ,  Check-in: 14:00, check-out: 12:00The opposite of what the words “B&B” usually mean – new, efficient and impersonal. About 1 km from the station in the direction away from the old town (it’s walkable), in an industrial zone (across from a car dealership, between a NATO installation and a disused rail line), this concrete box with a free parking lot provides surprisingly quiet, modern rooms with all amenities (including free WiFi). For truly sociofobic (or after midnight) it is even possible to check in without interacting with staff – a terminal in the lobby will take your credit card and issue the code for opening your room door; when it’s time to leave, there’s no key to turn in. If bed (comfortable) and breakfast (uninspired; €8) is indeed all you’re after, this is the place. Don’t believe Google Maps – they will send you to the wrong end of Rudolf-Diesel St., and eat in town before heading home – there are no decent restaurants around. Singles €54.

Mid-range

  • The RitterHauptstraße 178, ,  The Ritter is the oldest building (1592) in Heidelberg that has outlasted all fires and wars that have haunted the city over the times. It can get a little noisy considering its location directly at the heart of the Altstadt. Also a picturesque photo opportunity. Double occupancy: €118 to 206.
  • Hip HotelHauptstraße 115This was revamped in 2005 as a boutique hotel. Each room is modeled after a famous city, the most interesting room being the Zermatt (for Heidi and skiing fans).
  • Hotel Neu HeidelbergIn the west of Heidelberg’s center. 3 star hotel with a restaurant, breakfast buffet, terrace, garden, WiFi, bicycles for guests, free parking, various int. tv channels, etc. Easily reachable by car and public transportation.
  • NH Hotel Heidelberg1km west of the edge of the Altstadt, in an old brewery. However it’s been totally renovated and fitted out in a modernist decor, all glass, wood floors and exposed metal. Some of the rooms are very pleasant, though the ones overlooking the main road can be noisy. Food in the bar is disappointing.
  • Crowne PlazaA fairly standard anonymous business hotel just off Bismarckplatz. Rooms near the lifts can be extremely noisy, so are best avoided.
  • Hotel Holländer Hof Heidelberg, . Neckarstaden 66. The hotel has a unique view of the Neckar River and the Philosopher´s Walk. It is just opposite the Old Bridge.

Splurge

  • Europäischer HofA classic privately owned five star hotel just on the edge of the Altstadt. Pleasant atmosphere and attentive staff. Most of the rooms look out over the courtyard and are therefore admirably quiet.
  • Hirschgasse HeidelbergHirschgasse 3, . Check-in: 3PM, check-out: 12AMThe oldest hotel in Heidelberg and the oldest student dwelling house in Germany. It was first mentioned in a love story in 1472 and is nestled in a little side valley of a select residential area opposite the Heidelberg castle. An impressive walk along the River Neckar will take you to the Altstadt on the other side of the river. Mark Twain wrote about this in his book “A Tramp Abroad.” The rooms are all unique and will delight Laura Ashley fans and the ones seeking a good shot of authentic romantic ambiance. It comes along with two restaurants: the historic Mensurstube with regional dishes and over 250 year old tables, even Count Otto von Bismarck carved his name into. The elegant Le Gourmet is a classic French restaurant with attentive but yet uncomplicated service and will delight your credit cards with a good value for a swipe. A vineyard only a stone’s throw away from the hotel “Sunnyside upon the Bridge” provides a good local Riesling or Late Burgundy. from 125 to 335.

Hotels Heidelberg: Popularity

HotelStarsDiscountPrice per night, fromChoose dates

Crowne Plaza Heidelberg City Centre

★★★★

-12%

122108

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Leonardo Hotel Heidelberg

★★★★

-42%

8248

View Isaan Hotel Deals

Go next

  • Bertha Benz Memorial Route – Follow the tracks of the world’s first automobile journey (Mannheim – Pforzheim – Mannheim) back in 1888, leading right through Heidelberg
  • Darmstadt
  • Small cities on the Bergstraße between Darmstadt and Heidelberg: Weinheim, Heppenheim, Bensheim and Zwingenberg
  • Heilbronn
  • Karlsruhe
  • Mannheim
  • Schwetzingen
  • Dilsberg / Neckarsteinach – has four small castles in a row. Dilsberg’s castle has a well which is accessible by a tunnel. Neckarsteinach’s railway station is 20 mins away taking the S1 or S2 train from Hauptbahnhof or Karlstorbahnhof. From there it is a 5 km walk on a forest trail to Dilsberg, a medieval village with a town wall. The Dilsberg youth hostel is in the old city gate.

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Germany

Triberg Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Triberg1000x600

Triberg Im Schwarzwald is a small quiet German town located in Baden-Württemberg, in the heart of the Black Forest and is an enjoyable vacation spot. This city is popular for both its waterfall and its cuckoo clocks.

Coronavirus since Reopening

Germany Covid-19 Situation Report
185,414
Confirmed
490
Confirmed (24h)
8,763
Deaths
27
Deaths (24h)
4.7%
Deaths (%)
168,900
Recovered
400
Recovered (24h)
7,751
Active

Get in

From Freiburg, take the B31 to the B500 which takes you all the way to Triberg.

By train, you can take the Karlsruhe-Kreuzlingen RE (“Schwarzwaldbahn”), which also passes through Offenburg which is convinient if you are coming from Strassbourg or Freiburg im Breisgau. The trip is about 40 minutes to Offenburg. From the train station to the city centre you can walk (~2 km) or take a bus.

Get around

Walk or take a bus (not very frequent). There are several hiking trails around the waterfall.

See

  • Waterfall (Wasserfall). Largest waterfall in Germany outside of the Alps (163 m). Quite steep paths, there is a small entry fee. There are a lot of squirrels around, you may feed them (they sell food there).
  • The World’s Largest Cuckoo ClockThis is located in nearby Schonach.
  • The House of 1000 ClocksA clock shop featuring many different types of clocks including cuckoo clocks in many varieties.
  • Triberger Galgen (Triberger Galgen). erected in the late 16th century. The present stone gallows replaced its wooden predecessors in 1721.

Do

Enjoy the waterfall and forest scenery. There are several rest stops along the B500 to enjoy as well.

There’s a high ropes course near the waterfall with 5 difficulty levels. €11 per hour.

There is a also small cinema in the town (“Kronenlichtspiele”).

For hiking and winter sports options, go to one of the other villages around.

Buy

Black Forest Cuckoo Clocks — Being in the heart of the Black Forest, Triberg is an excellent place to purchase a Black Forest Cuckoo Clock. There are many shops in Triberg; some of which claim to hand-make the clocks in smaller quantities in order to preserve the tradition of Black Forest clock making. These shops can also typically accommodate the production of custom works.

A cuckoo clock from the house of 1000 clocks, which are made in a factory of Schönwald, just 2km from Triberg.

Eat

Black Forest Cake — At the Adler Cafe, this cake has two layers of chocolate (dark) cake with a cherry and liquor center surrounded by whipped cream and cherries on top with shaved dark chocolate.

There is a market square, though small, with several restaurants.

Where to stay in Triberg Im Schwarzwald

  • Adler Hotelreasonably priced.
  • Holiday Inna quite expensive, but you get the standard Holiday Inn treatment.

Go next

There are several small villages located around Triberg with very nice views from them.

  • Schonach – 2 km from Triberg–World’s Largest Cuckoo clock, clock making, and nature trails.
  • Schönwald – 2 km from Triberg–Golfing during the summer and skiing during the winter.
  • Furtwangen – Brend Observation Tower (1150 m).
  • St. Georgen – Swimming pool and lake.

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Germany

Karlsruhe Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Karlsruhe is a city on the Rhine in Baden-Württemberg in Germany. It is in the north of the Black Forest, close to the French border. Karlsruhe is famous in Germany for both hosting two federal courts and being a major hub for science and technology. With 300,000 people, Karlsruhe is the largest city within 60 km. It is not usually visited by tourists from abroad, but is a relaxed and pleasant city to work and study in.

Coronavirus since Reopening

Germany Covid-19 Situation Report
185,414
Confirmed
490
Confirmed (24h)
8,763
Deaths
27
Deaths (24h)
4.7%
Deaths (%)
168,900
Recovered
400
Recovered (24h)
7,751
Active

Understand

The city was founded in 1715 by Margrave Karl Wilhelm von Baden. The city was laid out on the drawing board. It consists of a central circle, containing the castle, and streets running towards the castle as radial “spokes”. This pattern is still visible today. Due to the fan-like layout, Karlsruhe is known as the “fan city” (Fächerstadt).

The Rhine valley, where Karlsruhe is located, is the warmest part of Germany because it is only about 115 m above sea level and there are mountains in the east (Black Forest) and west (Vogesen). Therefore, Karlsruhe has more sunny days than many other parts of Germany.

There isn’t a lot of tourist traffic to Karlsruhe. Tourists generally tend to gravitate towards the cities of Heidelberg (50 km to the north) and Freiburg (100 km to the south), with their well-preserved old towns. It’s a shame though, as Karlsruhe’s radial layout is one of the best early examples of New Urbanism, and is really a joy to explore. Maybe that’s a benefit to travelers who do venture there as the number of visitors is low enough to be sort of a novelty for the locals.

Karlsruhe is home to the two highest federal courts of Germany, the Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court) and the Bundesgerichtshof (Federal Court of Justice). Because of this and other administrative facilities, Karlsruhe has a reputation as a city of civil servants.

Karlsruhe has a large and renowned technical university (KIT) as well as several other colleges. The presence of the technical university has promoted the city somewhat in the world of Free and Open Source Software: Karlsruhe was the home of LinuxTag until 2005. Karlsruhe also hosts some of the major internet companies of Germany.

The city centre is plagued by considerable construction sites for a tram subway (“Kombilösung”) that is to be completed in 2020.

Get in

By plane

    • Baden-Airpark  is the nearest local airport, about 40 km from the city. The airport is served by low-cost carrier Ryanair, which offers cheap flights to several European destinations. There is a cheap airport shuttle bus (Baden-Airport-Express) (leaving 8 times a day on weekdays but no buses on weekends, synchronized with the flight schedule) to Karlsruhe Main Station. One-way-tickets can be bought from the driver (€9, cash only). Alternatively, you can take a bus to Rastatt (lines 234 und X34) or Baden-Baden (line 285), and from there take a connecting train or a tram-train to Karlsruhe. This connection is part of the Karlsruher Verkehrsverbund (KVV), the public transport provider for the region, and through-ticketing is available.
    • Frankfurt Airport  is Germany’s biggest airport and is served by all major carriers that operate in Germany. It has a direct ICE high speed train connection to Karlsruhe (1 hour).
    • Stuttgart Airport  is reachable by train in one and a half hours.

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By train

  • Karlsruhe HauptbahnhofThe main train station is located south of the city centre, with roughly 5–10 minutes by tram to the central market square, and direct tram links to other parts of the city. Karlsruhe is well linked to other larger cities by ICE high-speed trains. The schedules for the inter-city connections can be found on the site of Deutsche Bahn (German railways). There are also direct links to Paris and Marseille by French TGV high-speed trains.

By car

Karlsruhe has several exits from the A5 autobahn, approximately 130 km south of Frankfurt. The autobahn A8 joins the A5 just south of the city, connecting to Stuttgart 80 km east.

By bus

The bus station is at the south entrance of the train station. You can buy tickets for a couple of international destinations inside the train station.

Travel by bicycle in Karlsruhe

There are long-distance cycle routes connecting Karlsruhe with the surrounding cities, such as Heidelberg and Pforzheim. It is especially convenient travelling along the Upper Rhine Plain between the cities of Mainz and Basel.

Get aroun

On foot

A lot to see in Karlsruhe is along Kaiserstraße. Because all the streets radiate outward, Marktplatz (market square) is a great place to start a walking tour of the city. If you go up or down Kaiserstraße, you will find a great variety of shops and restaurants on both sides of the streets. If you go towards the Palace (right in front of you if you’re on Marktplatz), you can visit the city museum inside the castle, or the park right behind it, where the people of Karlsruhe congregate to picnic, play sports, and relax on nice days. Go farther and you can take a walk into “Hardtwald” forest which has a lot of trails right near the city center. Go south from Marktplatz and you will soon come upon “Ettlinger Tor” shopping mall and “Staatstheater” theatre. Exploring on foot allows you the opportunity to go down the alleys and smaller streets in Karlsruhe where you can find a wonderful variety of shops, kneipes, and restaurants.

By public transport

Karlsruhe has an excellent public transport system called Karlsruher Verkehrsverbund (KVV) (Karlsruhe Area Mass Transit Authority). It is mostly built on tram-trains (Stadtbahn). This allows trains to run on tram tracks within the city or on railway tracks to serve the surrounding region. An overview of the entire transport network can be downloaded here Liniennetzplan Schiene.

A single ticket for a trip within the city limits costs €2.50 for adults, €1.40 for kids. A day ticket (valid until 06:00 the next day) for one person costs €6.40 (Citysolo) and for up to 5 persons €10.60 (Cityplus).

Most tickets have to be stamped upon entering a tram and controllers are quite frequent. In particular, for longer distances outside of Karlsruhe buying the right ticket can be a bit challenging, but in front of the main train station as well as at Marktplatz, you will find a KVV office that will be happy to assist you.

Trains operate late into the night, in particular on weekends, but almost every line stops for a few hours every night. Schedules and maps are posted on virtually every station.

Travel by bicycle in Karlsruhe

During the summer, spring and autumn rental bikes are available throughout the city from the service Call a bike. A mobile phone is used to rent a bike and it can be ‘returned’ (again, using the mobile phone) at any inner city corner. Renting a bike costs no more than €0.08/min or €9.00/day.

See

A list of museums can be found on the city homepage. The city lists Karlsruhe’s cultural heritage in a database.

  • Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe (ZKM) (Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie), Lorenzstraße 19, . W-F 10:00-18:00, Sa Su holidays 11:00-18:00 (opening hours vary according to exhibitions)ZKM is devoted to interactive and ‘media art’. The museum is quite unique, and the exhibitions are world-class. The ZKM also hosts many cultural events, check their home page for the schedule. The same complex also hosts the Museum für Neue Kunst (Museum for New Art) and the city gallery.
  • Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe (Art Hall of the State), Hans-Thoma-Straße 2 – 6, . Tu-F 10:00-17:00, Sa Su holidays 10:00-18:00This museum shows mainly classical paintings from the 16th century on.
  • Karlsruhe Palace (Schloss Karlsruhe) (directly north of the city center). The palace is directly north of the city center, a 2-min walk on foot from the Marktplatz. The palace was rebuilt after World War II, and now hosts the Badisches Landesmuseum.
    • Badisches LandesmuseumTu-Th 10:00-17:00, F-Su and holidays 10:00-18:00, special exhibitions Tu-Su 10:00-18:00The palace hosts the Badisches Landesmuseum, a museum dedicated to historical exhibitions and local interest. There are also special exhibitions from time to time. Adults €4.
    • Palace Garden (Schlosspark). North of the palace is a vast park area, the palace garden, where the locals hang out on summer days. On Saturdays, Sundays and holidays during the summer season you can also take a ride on the small train that runs through the gardens. Steam trains usually run on Sundays while dieselpowered trains operate on Saturdays. Entry to the gardens is free.
  • Karlsruhe Pyramid (on the Marktplatz). The emblem of the city. It marks the place where Karl Wilhelm was buried, and is somewhat unremarkable.
  • Karlsruhe Zoo (Zoologischer Stadtgarten Karlsruhe) (near the main station). Opening hours vary throughout the year, but the main entrance is open at least daily 09:00-16:00, and longer in the summer months. The other entrances have shorter hours, check on the web pageThe zoo is moderately large, and does have some special attractions. In the Zoo, there is an artificial mountain (the Lauterberg), and a memorial for the 49° N parallel. You can also ride small boats (“gondolettas”) in the lake. A so-called water organ (music and fountains) plays every 30 minutes. Adults €6.50, children (6-15 years) €3.
  • State Museum of Natural History Karlsruhe (Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe), Erbprinzenstraße 13 (very close to Marktplatz), . Here can be found lots of interesting animals also plants. Ideal to see with children.
  • Baden Art Association (Badischer Kunstverein), Waldstraße 3, . Tu-Fr 11:00-19:00, Saturday to Sunday and holidays 11:00-17:00, Mo closedThe second-oldest art association in Germany, founded in Karlsruhe in 1818. Its focus is on contemporary art exhibitions and events (for example lectures, movies, guided tours). Adults €3, reduced €1.50.
  • Bauhaus-Siedlung DammerstockThe suburb Dammerstock has a residential area in the Bauhaus style, planned i.a. by the renowned architect Walter Gropius.
  • Durlach. Now a part of Karlsruhe, it is much older (first mentioned in the 12th century) than Karlsruhe itself and has a charming medieval town-center. It can be easily reached by tram 1 in a quarter of an hour. A word of advice: calling an inhabitant of Durlach a “Karlsruher” is asking for trouble. From the Turmberg (tower hill), you have a nice view over the city and the Rhine valley.
  • Kombilösung. This controversial project refers to the combination of a tram tunnel in Kaiserstraße and a road tunnel in Kriegsstraße, allegedly the solution (Lösung) for public transport capacity problems in Karlsruhe. There is an information pavillon near the Staatstheater, and in the coming years there will be lots of construction in the city. Not a sight as such, but interesting for public transport geeks.

Do

Court Pharmacy (Hof-Apotheke), Kaiserstraße 201, the oldest pharmacy in Karlsruhe and an early building by the Art Nouveau architect Hermann Billing (1867-1946), a native of the city
  • Badisches Staatstheater KarlsruheHermann-Levi-Platz 1, . The biggest theatre and opera house in the city. Your ticket entitles you to use public transportation within the entire KVV to get to the theatre and back on the day of the performance (and until 03:00 the next day). 
  • There are various smaller theatres. A list can be found on the city homepage.
  • WildparkstadionThe stadium where the Karlsruher Sport Club (KSC) plays all of their home games. If you are in Karlsruhe in the Fall or Spring, during the Bundesliga season, you should try to catch a KSC game during the weekend. KSC fans, including the “Ultras”, are some of the loudest and most passionate fans in all of German football, and definitely make the experience a good one. To really get in the action purchase a ticket in the ‘Stehplatz’ (Standing section) and try to buy early, as these are very popular events and the tickets go quickly! 
  • Go cycling. The city has developed a 20 point plan to become the cycling city in Germany. Many bike lanes and good direction signs for cyclicts are a visible mark. However, the activists of VCD and ADFC will be able to point out weaknesses and dangerous spots.
  • There are several man-made lakes in towns around (10–20 km) Karlsruhe, e.g. Epplesee in Rheinstetten (no BBQ allowed!) and in Weingarten and Untergrombach. Going by bike is a flat one-hour trip by bicycle, and swimming combined with a barbecue is a nice thing on a hot summer day.

Cinemas

The Schauburg and the Kino im Prinz-Max-Palais are independent cinemas which occasional show movies in their original language. The other cinemas tend to stick to the usual German-dubbed fare.

  • SchauburgMarienstraße 16, .
  • 4 Kino im Prinz-Max-PalaisKarlstr. 10+49 721 9374714.

Annual events

  • Das FestIn JulyKarlsruhe’s most famous yearly event taking place on a weekend in July in the Günther-Klotz Anlage (a suburban park) with about 200,000 spectators: An open-air festival comprising live music of various genres on multiple stages, presenting a mixture of world-class local and national artists. Attendance is €5 per day for the main stage, but other stages are free. Tickets are usually sold out about one month in advance.
  • African Summer FestivalIn JulyAfrican culture in Karlsruhe’s Nordstadt. Markets, drumming workshops, exhibitions, a varied children’s programme and musical performances take place during the three days, the aim being enjoyment for the whole family.
  • Schloss in FlammenIn JulyA music and fireworks performance in front of the palace. Tickets are quite expensive.
  • KAMUNA (Karlsruhe Night of Museums). In AugustOnce a year many museums in Karlsruhe cooperate to remain open until late into the night, hosting talks, workshops and rallys. The night usually ends with a live concert as the closing event. Special KAMUNA buttons are sold that allow for entrance in all participating museums and are also a ticket for the public transport. On the day of the KAMUNA the schedule of public transport is changed to allow the visitors to get home easily. KAMUNA is very popular in Karlsruhe and many people are attending.
  • Medieval SpectaculumIn AugustMedieval themed event with a market, games, music, knights in armor, magicians, fire show, etc. in the area around the Karlsruhe palace.

Eat

What to eat (if you want to try something typical):

  • Flammkuchen: The South-West German variant on pizza. The base is very thin and crispy and usually rectangular rather than circular. The traditional topping (some purists would say the only legitimate one) is cream cheese, onions, and bacon, but there are many variants (in particular some very tasty sweet ones that come flambéed). Just order one after the other (they get cold very fast), always sharing each one with everyone on the table.
  • Käsespätzle: a special kind of pasta in a heavy cheese sauce.
  • Gebratene Maultaschen: kind of like Ravioli, but much larger and fried with onions. May sound strange, but you really can’t do much wrong with these.
  • Wurstsalat: Sausage Salad; well, its Germany after all. Comes with bread and is really quite tasty.
  • Hackepeter: Raw minced meat with fresh onions and bread. You don’t get this very often (but for example at Vogelbräu).
  • Yufka Döner: A kind of döner but a wrap is used instead of proper bread. Sold in dozens of places it is probably the cheapest way to get a complete meal.

Where to eat:

  • ViVA RestaurantLammstraße 7a, . Offers vegetarian and vegan food in the city center.
  • ShogunZähringerstraße 96A good place to eat sushi.
  • Pizzahaus is an Italian restaurant with good pizza. (Rintheimer Straße 2)
  • Vogelbräu KarlsruheKapellenstraße 50, . Open dailyA beer garden, restaurant and brewery. You get good beer and German food here, really a nice place for lunch, dinner or drinking. There are two more ‘Vogelbräu’ restaurants in the nearby towns of Ettlingen and Durlach.
  • LitfaßKreuzstraße 10A restaurant in the heart of Karlsruhe that offers a good variety of regional specialties including Maultaschen, Käsespätzle, and a pretty tasty Jägerschnitzel.
  • Café Bleu, Café EmailleTwo restaurants owned by the same purveyor that runs “Die Kippe”. Both have the same menu as Die Kippe, but different atmospheres. (Bleu is at Kaiserallee 11 and Emaille at Kaiserstraße 142) All three restaurants are as described above, and always a nice place to grab breakfast, a drink with friends, or a quick meal without breaking the bank.
  • Dean&DavidKaiserstraße 223aA very modern franchise restaurant that strives to offer healthy fast-food from fresh ingredients. It offers mostly curries, soups and a large selection of salads.
  • StövchenWaldstraße 54, . A great place to try Flammkuchen and relax with a cocktail or two. The name means little oven.
  • Panda, Scheffelstraße 2 (on the crossroads between Kaiserallee and Scheffelstraße), is a food stall serving authentic Chinese food at about €6 per meal.

Drink

Like other cities in Germany, Karlsruhe has a few regional brands of beer, of which Hoepfner is the most famous. It is also worth exploring the microbreweries scattered around the city, such as the Vogelbräu, Wolf Brauerei and the Badische Brauhaus, all of which have seasonal specialities.

  • Badisch BrauhausStephanienstraße 38-40, . A very large multi-story beer garden, brewery and restaurant. On its uppermost floor is a cocktail bar; probably the nicest place in Karlsruhe for cocktails (although on weekends it can be difficult to get a seat and service can be slow).
  • Hoepfner BurghofHaid-und-Neu-Straße 18, . Brewery and beer garden.
  • Alter BrauhofBeiertheimer Allee 18aA nice place to sit outside and have a beer (only a good place in summer), also offers decent food. Its not so well known, so you stand a good chance of finding a nice place even on a nice summer evening even on weekends.
  • Z-10Zähringerstraße 10, . A bar run by local university students that is frequented by the Karlsruhe’s student population. There are several local beers offered here for very cheap (think €1-1.50) and also decent cocktails. Bands are frequently playing on Saturdays (no entry fee) and visitors can play cards, board games and table soccer with other patrons. Check the website for hours as the bar is generally only open when school is in session.
  • Scruffy’sKarlstraße 4 (across from the Europaplatz), . Scruffy’s is Karlsruhe’s best Irish Pub. The interior of the bar is reminiscent of the hold of an old ship and is a comfortable environment. There are a variety of beers and whiskeys, as well as good Irish music every week. Often the owner’s band will play, always a treat. The bartenders and some of the patrons are native English speakers, so it’s a good place to let the tourist’s brain relax after speaking a lot of German! Just make sure you keep a good count on how many beers you order – the owner occasionally miscounts.
  • DorfschänkeAm Künstlerhaus 33, . The Dorfschänke is Karlsruhe’s oldest Kneipe, and a good place to meet up with people. With the normal selection of beers and drinks, this is also a good place to see bands or to watch soccer outside during the summer. There is also a fairly popular “Kicker” (or Foos-ball) table inside where you can pick up a game or two. Be prepared to pay cover on nights when bands are playing.
  • AgosteaA nice but pricy club near the Kronenplatz with 2 dancefloors.
  • Leonardo’s Expresso BarZaehringerstraßeThere you can enjoy original Italian coffee, good cocktails and also a lot of wines. The bar is a smoker bar with a separated room where you can smoke cigars. The bar is also offering many cigars from around the world. The prices are okay. The personnel speak English. The Leonard, or also called Leo is one of the political Bars in Karlsruhe. High ranking officials from the City, the Courts, the University and the Party are there often seen.

Buy

Most shops are located in the pedestrian zone in the Kaiserstraße. At Ludwigsplatz, near Kaiserstraße, there are various open-air cafes where the shopper can relax. Some of the more expensive boutiques and shoe shops are also located in this area.

In the south of the Marktplatz, at the end of the pedestrian zone, is a big shopping mall called “Ettlinger Tor”. Definitely an alternative to the Kaiserstraße, especially when the weather is bad.

Where to stay in Karlsruhe

Budget

  • DJH Youth Hostel KarlsruheMoltkestraße 24, . Requires membership in their hostelling organization.
  • A&O Karlsruhe HauptbahnhofBahnhofsplatz 14-16, . Hostel
  • Hotel Garni BetzlerAmalienstraße 3.
  • Bed & Breakfast in Karlsruhe DurlachAm Steinbruch 1, . Two furnished guestrooms for 1-3 guests in one of Karlsruhe’s historical districts. From €25 per person.

Mid-range

  • Hotel Alfa Karlsruhe-CityBlumenstraße 17, .
  • Art Hotel RoyalKriegsstraße 94, .

Splurge

  • Schlosshotel KarlsruheBahnhofplatz 2, .
  • Novotel Karlsruhe CityFestplatz 2, .

Stay safe due to the Coronavirus situation in Karlsruhe

Karlsruhe is maybe one of the safest cities in Germany especially the centre of the town. There are a lot of policemen walking and driving around, mainly because of the important courts. Maybe some suburbs should be avoided at night (Oberreut, Neureut and Daxlanden (not really)), but otherwise, one will feel safe in this city.

Telecommunications in Karlsruhe

  • Thalia – A bookstore in the main shopping street (Kaiserstraße 167) has some internet terminals in the uppermost floor
  • Gelbe Seiten – This quite stylish bar/cafe close to Ettlinger Tor (Karl-Friedrich-Straße 22) has free WLAN, one internet computer; offers a nice selection of drinks&cocktails and some simple food.
  • Kaffee Schiller – Has free WLAN and a few computers to use. You also get good coffee, cakes and some simple (but good) food. Its close to the main shopping street and the university. (Kronenstr.30)
  • An extensive (but German) list of further locations can be found here.

Cope

Religious services

  • Unsere Liebe Frau, Marienstr. 80 (from central station 800 m direction Nordeast). Su 10:15; Tu 15:00; Th-F 18:30
  • St. Michael, Barbarossaplatz (from central station 1000 m direction west). Sa 18:00; Su 11:15, 16:00 (Croat.); Tu 08:00; W 07:45; Th 18:00
  • St. Elisabeth, Südendstraße 39 (from central station 1400 m direction nordwest). Su 09:45; Tu 18:00; W 07:45; Th 18:00
  • Deutschsprachiger Muslimkreis (German-speaking Muslim circle), Kaiserpassage 10 (from central station 1400 m direction center).
  • Chabad of Karlsruhe Jewish Synagogue and Center that holds services on Friday nights (varying times), Saturday mornings and on Jewish holidays 10:00.

Go next

  • Ettlingen — the neighboring town
  • Bertha Benz Memorial Route — follow the tracks of the world’s first automobile journey (Mannheim – Pforzheim/Black Forest – Mannheim) back in 1888, leading right through Karlsruhe-Grötzingen
  • Baden-Baden
  • Heidelberg
  • Stuttgart
  • Freiburg
  • Paris — the French TGV high speed train gets you there in as little as 2 hours and 31 minutes

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Germany

Bad Säckingen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Bad-Säckingen1000x600

Bad Säckingen is a magnificent little city located in the very southern part of Germany. For tourists, it is ideally located at the southern end of the Black Forest and Switzerland is just a few minutes walk away, corssing over the lovely old wooden bridge. Nearby attractions include Basel, Freiburg and Konstanz.

The town is also known as the town of the trumpeter, due to the book by Joseph Victor von Scheffel, “Der Trompeter von Säkkingen”.

Coronavirus since Reopening

Germany Covid-19 Situation Report
185,414
Confirmed
490
Confirmed (24h)
8,763
Deaths
27
Deaths (24h)
4.7%
Deaths (%)
168,900
Recovered
400
Recovered (24h)
7,751
Active

Get in

The place can easily be reached by car as well as public transport.

Travel to Bad Säckingen by car

  • from the north: Travel on the Highway A5 to Basel, then follow the A98 and B34 east
  • from the south: Follow the signs to either Basel or Zurich. Then travel to Stein in Switzerland and cross over the new bridge.
  • from the west: From Basel follow the A98 and B34
  • from the east: From Waldshut follow the A98 and B34 westwards

Travel by train to Bad Säckingen

There is a big intercity train station in Basel which can be reached easily from most major cities in the western part of Germany. Be sure to switch trains at Basel Badischer Bahnhof (not at Basel SBB). From there you can catch connecting trains to Bad Säckingen that run on a regular basis. Coming from the east (e.g. from Munich), you can usually travel via Ulm (possibly changing trains in Singen or Ravensburg). From Ulm on it will usually be a local train, but be prepared to watch some nice scenery on your way to Bad Säckingen. Make sure to sit on the left side (in running direction) of the train, so you can have a nice view of the river Rhine. Check for up to date fare information at DB.

Fly to Bad Säckingen

Conveniently located airports are Basel/Mulhouse and Zurich.

Get around

Being a small city, you can reach most main attractions in the inner city by foot. Renting a bicycle might be a good idea to venture into the lovely suburbs like Wallbach or Obersäckingen, that can be reached in a few minutes. There are also public buses running to the suburbs. Furthermore, there is a local bus, the city-bus.

Sightseeing in Bad Säckingen

The main attractions are all conveniently located in the city centre. You should definitely have a look at the St. Fridolinsmuenster, the old Wooden Bridge, and the romantic Trompeterschloss in a nice park.

  • St. FridolinsmuensterThe Gothic cathedral in the middle of town was built around 1300 after a fire had destroyed most of the city. It is named after St. Fridolin, the patron of the city. The bones of St. Fridolin are stored in a shrine in the cathedral and are worshipped as relics.
  • Covered Wooden BridgeThe bridge connecting the town to the small city of Stein in Switzerland is another main attraction. It is closed for cars (as is most of the inner city), so you can take a unhurried walk across to the other side of the River, enjoying the magnificent view from the bridge. The bridge itself was built in ???? and is well known for being the longest covered wooden bridge in Europe.
  • Trumpeter’s PalaceBad Säckingen is also known as the Trumpeter’s city, because one of the most popular German author in the 19th century, Joseph Victor von Scheffel, wrote a book on a trumpeter and the story is set in Säckingen. The story itself is quite greasy, but very romantic. You can find signs hinting to the trumpeter (and to the Kater Hidigeigei, which is an early ancestor of Garfield, another figure from one of Scheffel’s books) all over town, the main one being the Trumpeter’s palace, conveniently located in the so-called Schlosspark (Palace Park). The Trumpeter’s Palace also contains one of the most complete collections of trumpets in Germany that is open to the public.

What to do in Bad Säckingen

  • Walk to the lovely Bergesee
  • Swim at the Aqualon

There are a couple of nice restaurants around town, however regarding late-night entertainment, the city has not much to offer.

Events

  • Brückenfest
  • Shrovetide

Shopping in Bad Säckingen

You can buy ‘Rheinkiesel’, sweets looking like small stones from the Rhine, at bakeries in town. There you can also get sweets with an image of the Trompeter von Saeckingen on it, which give a nice souvenir.

Where to eat in Bad Säckingen

There are lots of nice small restaurants located just next to the central square of town, the Muensterplatz, located just next to the St. Fridolins-Muenster. There are also some other places spread out across the city.

  • Zum Schwarzen WalfischMünsterplatz 30Cosy diner serving traditional food. Main course 12 to 15 euros.

Drink

At most restaurants you can also just have a drink and many have a bar, where you can relax while sipping on one of the great local beers.

Where to stay in Bad Säckingen

For a listing of hotels, pensions and bed & breakfasts, visit the town tourist website

  • Hotel SchweizerblickSchneckenhalde 1, .
  • Hotel St. FridolinHasenrütte 4, .

Stay safe

Note that crossing the Covered Wooden Bridge (and thus the border to or from Switzerland) at night is only allowed if you have accomodation in Bad Säckingen or a nearby town or village.

Go next

  • Rheinfelden
  • Laufenburg

Day trips

Nearby attractions, that can be visited easily in a day if you base yourself in Saeckingen are: Basel, Konstanz, Zurich, Alsace, Schaffhausen with the Rheinfall, Triberg and Freiburg.

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Essen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Essen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany. Understand Essen is the central and second largest city of the Ruhr, the largest...

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Germany1 week ago

Cologne Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Germany currently experience an outbreak of the Coronavirus / Covid-19 including Cologne and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Cologne (German: Köln, Ripuarian: Kölle)...

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Germany1 week ago

Moenchengladbach Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to NRW Germany

Mönchengladbach is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany with 257,000 Inhabitants. Understand “MG”, as it is often abbreviated, is mostly renown for its Soccer...

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Germany1 week ago

Freiburg Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Freiburg im Breisgau is a major city in Baden-Württemberg in southwest Germany, situated on the edge of the Black Forest (Schwarzwald). Picturesquely located on the river...

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Germany1 week ago

Siegen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Siegen is a city in eastern North Rhine-Westphalia (Nordrhein-Westfalen), Germany. Understand It lies withing the Westerwald low mountain region. Coronavirus since Reopening Get in By...

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Germany1 week ago

Wuppertal Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Wuppertal is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia in the northwestern part of Germany. Understand It is a result of a 1929 merger of the...

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Germany1 week ago

Duisburg Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Duisburg is a German city in the western part of the Ruhr area (Ruhrgebiet) in North Rhine-Westphalia. It is a metropolitan...

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Germany1 week ago

Krefeld Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Krefeld is a city in Lower Rhine in North Rhine-Westphalia with 234,000 inhabitants. Krefeld’s residents speak Hochdeutsch, or standard German, but the native dialect is...

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Germany1 week ago

Gummersbach Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Gummersbach is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located 50 km east of Cologne. In the past it was nicknamed “the Lime...

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Germany1 week ago

Baden-Baden Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Black Forest Germany

Baden-Baden (meaning “The Baths in Baden”) is a spa town built on thermal springs at the edge of the Black Forest in Baden-Württemberg, south west Germany....

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Germany1 week ago

Gelsenkirchen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Gelsenkirchen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Understand Gelsenkirchen is in the heart of the Ruhr region in Germany. Located in the...

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Germany1 week ago

Duelmen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Dülmen is a city in southern Münsterland, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is surrounded by the river Lippe to the south, the Baumberge hills to...

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Germany1 week ago

Iserlohn Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Iserlohn is a city in the South Westphalia region in Germany. Coronavirus since Reopening Get in The closest airport is in Dortmund, about 25 km away. Iserlohn...

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Germany1 week ago

Siegburg Coronavirus Travel After Covid-19

Siegburg (i.e. fort on the Sieg river) is a city in the district of Rhein-Sieg-Kreis, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located on the...

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Germany1 week ago

Luedinghausen Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update to Münsterland

Lüdinghausen is a small town in Münsterland. Its byname is “town of three castles”. Coronavirus since Reopening Get in There are hourly...

Germany1 week ago

Neuss Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Neuss is a medium-sized city across the Rhine river from Düsseldorf in the North Rhine-Westphalia region of Germany.  It is located on the west bank of the Rhine opposing...

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Germany1 week ago

Leverkusen Coronavirus Travel After Covid-19

Leverkusen is an industrial city in the Cologne Lowland region of Western Germany. Understand Leverkusen is a relatively young city; its history...

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Germany1 week ago

Heilbronn Coronavirus Covid-19 Travel Update

Heilbronn is a city with 117,000 inhabitants in Baden-Württemberg in Germany. The city on the Neckar is a former Imperial Free City and is the seat of Heilbronn District....

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